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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

ANNUAL 
TOWN REPORT 




CHELMSFORD 

1988 



Cover photo by Jean Sougnez 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 



Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1988 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 
Location 



County 

Land Area: 

Population 1986: 

Assessed Valuation Rate 1987 

Tax Rate: 



United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 



Board of Health 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 



Children's House 



McKay Library 



School Superintendent 
Selectmen's Office 
Town Clerk 



Tax Collector & Treasurer 



Veterans' Agent 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, 

Carlisle on the South, and Westford on the West. 

It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 

Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

31,627 

$1,484,355,124 (Real Estate) 

$31,850,038 (Personal Property) 

$15.56 

($15,295 Residential -$16. 34 Commercial) 

Chester G. Atkins, Concord 
Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Carol C. Cleven, Chelmsford 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Thursday 9:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Tuesday in April 

Last Monday in April 

7:00 p.m. -every other Monday 

7:30 p.m. -every other Tuesday 

7:30 p.m.-2nd & 4th Wed. of month 

7:30 p.m. -4th Thursday 

8:00 p.m. -1st & 3rd Tuesdays 

7:00 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 

7:30 p.m. -1st Tuesday of month 



9 Precincts 
McCarthy Jr. High 
Town Offices 
Parker School 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




(Seated 1-r) Dennis J. Ready, Chairman; Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Vice Chairman 
(Standing 1-r) Roger A. Blomgren; Bonita A. Towle, Clerk; Bradford O. Emerson 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

The Board of Selectmen held their re-organizational 
meeting on April 11, 1988, following the Annual Town Elec- 
tion in which Bonita Towle was re-elected to her fourth 
term on the Board, and former Selectman Bradford O. 
Emerson elected to fill the chair vacated by John P. Emer- 
son, Jr. Dennis J. Ready was elected Chairman, Henrick 
R. Johnson, Jr., Vice Chairman and Miss Towle, Clerk. Mr. 
Emerson and Roger A. Blomgren are the other two 
members. 

Major accomplioshments in 1988 included the comple- 
tion of Phase I and the groundbreaking for Phase II on 
the Route 129 improvement project; completion of the 
recreational facilities at Southwell Field, a state and federal- 
ly funded complex containing playing fields, a park shelter 
facility and a boat ramp on the Merrimack River, passage 
of the Cranberry Bog legislation establishing a special con- 
servation district; and submission of legislation creating a 
Chelmsford Department of Public Works. 

The Board of Selectmen applied for and were awarded 
State grants for a Public Management study of the Select- 
men's office, and Public Safety grants for studies of the 
Police and Fire Departments. Changes in the Selectmen's 
office included the beginning of implementation of cen- 
tralized purchasing, regular monthly department head 
meetings, and the addition of 6-hour per week Occupa- 
tional Health Nurse funded by the MIIA. The renovation 
and enlargement of the Town Offices parking lot was com- 
pleted during the year. And the Selectmen went out for 
bid on a centralized telephone system for all Town depart- 
ments, to be installed early in 1989. 

Several committees worked diligently with the Board, at- 
tempting to alleviate ongoing problems. The Trash Advisory 
Committee spent long hours and put in much effort to 
come up with alternatives to present to the Board on the 
problem of trash collection. They considered various op- 
tions, including regional facilities, recycling, composting 
etc. The Committee will be making final recommendations 
to the Board early in 1989. Two other committees started 
in 1988 were the Citizens for a Cleaner Chelmsford, who 
are planning a Town-wide Cleanup Day for April, 1989, 
and the Community Alcohol and Drug Awareness Com- 
mittee, a group of citizens and officials concerned about 
the growing alcohol and drug problem in the Community. 



The Town continued to participate as a partnership com- 
munity under the Executive Office of Communities and 
Development Housing Opportunity Program (HOP). A 
total of four proposals for Affordable Housing have been 
presented to the Town, and the Board has endorsed one, 
a 168 unit proposal on Littleton Road. 

The Board of Selectmen continued their active role in 
the Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, the Northern 
Middlesex Area Commission, the Middlesex County Ad- 
visory Board and the Massachusetts Municipal Association. 
Individual Selectmen also served as liaisons between the 
Board of Selectmen and various town and regional boards 
and commissions during the year. 

Due to the fact that national and state legislative deci- 
sions have a great impact on Town affairs, the Board of 
Selectmen maintained regular contact with Congressman 
Atkins' office as well as with Senator Carol Amick and State 
Representative Carol Cleven. The Selectmen wish to ex- 
press their gratitude to Congressman Atkins, Senator 
Amick and Representative Cleven for their help and 
cooperation during the past year. 

In closing, the Selectmen, on behalf of the citizens of 
Chelmsford, wish to express their sincere gratitude to the 
various Town boards and committees for their ac- 
complishments during the year. It should be remembered 
that these boards and committees are composed of unpaid 
volunteers who take many long hours out of their free time 
to work on issues and projects that benefit the Town of 
Chelmsford. The Board would also like to recognize our 
competent and dedicated office staff of Mrs. Judith Carter, 
Ms. Beth Cutcrumbes and Mrs. Marian Currier. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Dennis J. Ready, Chairman 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Bonita A. Towle, Clerk 

Bradford O. Emerson, Member 

Roger A. Blomgren, Member 

Bernard F. Lynch, Executive Secretary 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney, Assistant Town Clerk 



Sporting 
Licenses 


Dog 
Licenses 

3048 

Deaths 
263 


Kennel 
Licenses 

11 

Marriages 
331 


Recorded 
Mortgages 


1367 
Births inc. 


772 
Intentions 


373 


340 



REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 8, 1988 



♦indicates candidate for re-election 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

Pierre S. DuPont, IV 
Marion G. (Pat) Robinson 
George Bush 
Alexander M. Haig Jr. 
Jack Kemp 
Bob Dole 
No Preference 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 



257 



Pet 2 



218 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



247 



226 



314 



297 



314 



250 



Pet 9 



276 



Total 



9 


6 


3 


2 


5 


4 


3 


3 


4 


39 


10 


8 


8 


9 


26 


14 


3 


7 


8 


93 


144 


119 


144 


127 


146 


175 


199 


153 


175 


1382 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 


2 


2 





1 


13 


14 


21 


21 


20 


30 


19 


21 


24 


18 


188 


73 


58 


67 


61 


96 


78 


83 


57 


64 


637 





3 





2 


9 


4 


2 


4 


5 


29 


1 




















2 





3 


5 


2 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 





1 


15 



2399 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN 5th Middlesex District 

Paul F.X. Powers* 146 123 130 130 189 152 164 142 145 1321 

Blanks 111 95 117 96 125 145 150 108 131 1078 

TOTAL 257 218 247 226 314 297 314 250 276 2399 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 5th Middlesex District 
Joyce W. Kidd 123 

Blanks 134 

TOTAL 257 



115 
103 



218 



145 
102 



247 



125 
101 



183 
131 



145 
152 



181 
133 



226 



314 



297 



314 



140 
110 



250 



160 
116 



276 



1317 
1082 



2399 



TOWN COMMITTEE GROUP 1 

Richard F. Scott 
William R. Logan 
Eileen K. Fletcher 
Constance A. Pickard 
Richard F. Burtt Jr. 
Walter A. Cleven 
Francis X. Harrison, Jr. 
John S. Fudge, Jr. 
Peter Dulchinos 
Janet B. Hendl 
Frances S. dejager 
Florence E. Morrison 
Halvar P. Peterson 
Rita M. Gamache 
John H. Ketcham 
Robert F. Wood 

***write-in candidate 
Carol C. Cleven 
Nicholas Theochares 
Marguerite Waldron 
Ivor K. Clements 
Linda D. Marinel 
Phyllis May Huff 
Harry A. Foster 
Richard P. Tevlin 
GROUP 2 
Daphne G. Freeman 
Lewis L. Prager 
Josephine A. Tambo 
Nancy P. Clark 
Janet F. Bonica*** 
John Warren*** 
W. Matthew Whiting*** 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



140 


108 


123 


111 


162 


161 


171 


132 


152 


1260 


166 


120 


151 


117 


182 


172 


190 


147 


162 


1407 


145 


118 


145 


115 


165 


168 


180 


140 


157 


1333 


131 


105 


124 


105 


157 


152 


170 


131 


146 


1221 


135 


112 


126 


104 


151 


153 


163 


126 


145 


1215 


155 


122 


170 


137 


203 


196 


208 


162 


176 


1529 


126 


105 


118 


99 


151 


140 


155 


124 


148 


1166 


134 


110 


132 


108 


153 


161 


165 


130 


174 


1267 


142 


111 


149 


117 


169 


165 


176 


149 


153 


1331 


129 


111 


135 


103 


156 


149 


171 


138 


144 


1236 


125 


103 


114 


98 


148 


149 


159 


125 


146 


1167 


132 


105 


118 


105 


156 


144 


154 


121 


139 


1174 


131 


119 


131 


104 


154 


153 


163 


129 


145 


1229 


135 


106 


131 


106 


154 


150 


162 


133 


145 


1222 


126 


108 


116 


99 


148 


149 


153 


123 


138 


1160 


132 


107 


123 


105 


159 


147 


154 


126 


146 


1199 


187 


143 


185 


152 


237 


222 


243 


186 


211 


1766 


127 


103 


116 


99 


154 


143 


155 


126 


154 


1177 


130 


106 


125 


103 


151 


146 


169 


129 


146 


1205 


132 


102 


114 


101 


150 


142 


159 


123 


143 


1166 


130 


119 


125 


107 


153 


156 


162 


129 


139 


1220 


131 


106 


123 


104 


154 


152 


161 


130 


139 


1200 


134 


121 


134 


103 


158 


146 


166 


131 


147 


1240 


130 


105 


113 


105 


151 


148 


159 


124 


142 


1177 


108 


79 


115 


94 


132 


132 


135 


102 


111 


1008 


70 


59 


72 


65 


94 


76 


94 


72 


80 


682 


66 


58 


73 


67 


97 


80 


113 


70 


85 


709 


90 


60 


86 


76 


108 


101 


104 


86 


84 


795 


6 


4 











2 


3 


2 


7 


24 


3 





1 


3 








1 


2 


3 


13 


3 

















1 


2 





6 





1 


1 




















2 


5364 


4694 


5156 


4998 


6683 


6240 


6471 


5200 


5653 


50459 



8995 



7630 



8645 



7910 



10990 



10395 



10990 



8750 



9660 



83965 



DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 8, 1986 



♦•indicates candidate for re-election 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Michael S. Dukakis 

Albert Gore, Jr. 

Florenzo DiDonato 

Paul Simon 

Bruce Babbitt 

Richard E. Gephardt 

Jesse L. Jackson 

Gary Hart 

Lyndon H. LaRouche, Jr. 

No Preference 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 



389 



Pet 2 



372 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



390 



421 



440 



410 



482 



423 



Pet 9 



344 



Total 



216 


198 


230 


236 


227 


208 


269 


228 


174 


1986 


20 


22 


20 


20 


33 


32 


29 


16 


20 


212 








1 


1 








1 








3 


12 


21 


15 


14 


22 


16 


28 


23 


17 


168 


1 


3 


3 


2 


4 


2 


6 


2 


4 


27 


64 


44 


41 


72 


57 


64 


62 


49 


49 


502 


62 


66 


64 


52 


81 


67 


74 


82 


66 


614 


4 


7 


8 


5 


3 


5 


4 


8 


3 


47 








2 


4 











1 


1 


8 


7 


8 


5 


10 


11 


10 


6 


9 


7 


73 








1 











3 








4 


3 


3 





5 


2 


6 





5 


3 


27 



3671 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN 5th Middlesex District 

Chester G. Atkins* 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 5th Middlesex District 

Carla C. Cataldo 
Lorraine Greiff 
Blanks 



TOTAL 



270 


259 


283 


311 


315 


271 


349 


303 


220 


2581 


119 


113 


107 


110 


125 


139 


133 


120 


124 


1090 


389 


372 


390 


421 


440 


410 


482 


423 


344 


3671 


rict 

117 


112 


113 


116 


131 


122 


120 


122 


107 


1060 


94 


89 


97 


130 


134 


137 


148 


113 


82 


1024 


178 


171 


180 


175 


175 


151 


214 


188 


155 


1587 



389 



372 



390 



421 



440 



410 



482 



423 



344 



3671 



TOWN COMMITTEE GROUP 1 

Eleanor D. Abbott 
John G. Abbott 
Linda J. Allen 
Dean J. Bergeron 
James Brough 
Kathryn Brough 
Irene J. Cetaruk 
Ruth K. Delaney 
Stratos G. Dukakis 
John P. Emerson, Jr. 
Kathleen S. Fitzpatrick 
Susan J. Gates 
Joan M. Gauthier 
Mark W. Gauthier 
James M. Geary, Jr. 
Alexander W. Gervais 
James M. Harrington 
Gloria D. Huber 
Richard J. Jerome 
Susan G. Koecjhaven 
Yvette M. Lemire 
Frances T. McDougall 
Mary B. McNally 
Carl A. Olsson 
Judith A. Olsson 
Marianne J. Pareksy 
Gail Poulten 
Samuel Poulten 
Dennis J. Ready 
Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Charles K. Spear 
Bonita Towle 
Cheryl M. Warshafsky 
Karen A. Wharton 
Mary E. White 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



159 


165 


175 


196 


222 


180 


216 


177 


171 


1661 


159 


155 


156 


189 


213 


175 


200 


168 


162 


1577 


160 


153 


161 


196 


230 


176 


199 


180 


152 


1607 


190 


182 


176 


214 


230 


200 


235 


216 


156 


1799 


164 


157 


177 


193 


210 


178 


216 


184 


153 


1632 


156 


159 


176 


199 


216 


181 


222 


181 


162 


1652 


158 


157 


165 


188 


202 


181 


219 


181 


149 


1600 


191 


182 


189 


258 


232 


211 


243 


195 


174 


1875 


175 


167 


186 


213 


224 


195 


241 


188 


160 


1749 


202 


192 


218 


239 


240 


228 


242 


217 


181 


1959 


173 


167 


193 


208 


227 


201 


231 


199 


167 


1766 


155 


153 


157 


194 


216 


170 


202 


177 


154 


1578 


163 


158 


179 


195 


215 


187 


210 


172 


162 


1641 


170 


161 


178 


195 


209 


197 


214 


179 


164 


1667 


202 


176 


204 


229 


233 


229 


253 


205 


188 


1919 


166 


174 


168 


202 


203 


179 


201 


193 


146 


1632 


191 


180 


189 


231 


236 


222 


234 


208 


171 


1862 


153 


155 


163 


191 


204 


180 


206 


175 


146 


1573 


152 


154 


156 


187 


197 


167 


193 


174 


139 


1519 


157 


158 


162 


189 


210 


172 


206 


171 


155 


1580 


152 


154 


151 


195 


200 


170 


200 


173 


143 


1538 


165 


159 


171 


208 


202 


179 


211 


180 


151 


1626 


163 


165 


160 


213 


206 


201 


215 


183 


148 


1654 


175 


172 


177 


231 


223 


226 


234 


196 


182 


1816 


165 


168 


175 


228 


219 


222 


226 


182 


168 


1753 


160 


162 


181 


192 


210 


185 


208 


189 


156 


1643 


161 


159 


173 


204 


223 


185 


215 


178 


160 


1658 


188 


166 


180 


207 


242 


201 


220 


195 


171 


1770 


186 


178 


199 


224 


248 


207 


264 


207 


175 


1888 


225 


213 


214 


281 


257 


263 


273 


228 


188 


2142 


151 


149 


162 


185 


195 


174 


194 


176 


139 


1525 


203 


199 


227 


270 


260 


223 


262 


222 


192 


2058 


158 


154 


158 


193 


227 


178 


208 


181 


148 


1605 


162 


155 


161 


185 


208 


177 


199 


168 


156 


1571 


182 


173 


179 


235 


223 


235 


233 


201 


163 


1824 




















1 








1 


7623 


7189 


7454 


7378 


7688 


7515 


9124 


8206 


6388 


68565 



13615 



13020 



13650 



14735 



15400 



14350 



16870 



14805 



12040 



128480 



WARRANT FOR 

THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 5, 1988 and April 25, 1988 

Middlesex, SS. 

To the constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, Viz: 

Precinct 1. Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2. Harrington School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3. Harrington School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4. Westland School Cafeteria 
Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6. Westland School Cafeteria 
Precinct 7. McCarthy Middle School, Small 

Gymnasium 
Precinct 8. McCarthy Middle School, Small 

Gymnasium 
Precinct 9. Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the fifth (5th) day of April, 1988, being the 
first Tuesday in said month, at 7:00 A.M., for the follow- 
ing purposes: 

To bring in their vote for the following officers: 
Two Selectmen for three years 

One Member of the Board of Assessors for three years 
One Member of Board of Health for three years 
One Member of School Committee for three years 
Two Public Library Trustees for three years 
One Park Commissioner for three years 
One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
One Member of Housing Authority for five years 
Three Planning Board Members for three years 
One Sewer Commissioner for three years 
Nine Charter Commission Members 

and to vote on the following questions: 

Question 1. 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to assess an 
additional $1,347,385 in real estate and personal property 
taxes for the purpose of paying debt services on bonds and 



notes excluding bond issues already exempt from proposi- 
tion two and one-half, so-called, and short-term borrow- 
ings in anticipation of revenues or of state or federal aid, 
for which the money from this assessment will be used for 
the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1988? 

Yes 

No 

Question 2. 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to exempt from 
the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, 
the amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued in 
order to acquire land for constructing an addition to the 
Adams Public Library? 

Yes 

No 

Question 3. 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to exempt from 
the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, 
the amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued in 
order to construct an addition to the Adams Public Library 
and renovate the existing Adams Public Library? 

Yes 

No 

Question 4. 

"Shall a Commission be elected to frame a Charter for 
Chelmsford?" 

Yes 

No 

Question 5. 

THE QUESTION IS NONBINDING 
Shall the Town of Chelmsford urge Town Meeting to peti- 
tion the Great and General Court to consolidate its town 
departments into a department of Public Works and com- 
bine the three water districts into a single entity? 

Yes 

No 

The polls will be open from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium 
on Monday, the twenty-fifth (25th) day of April, 1988, at 
7:30 P.M. in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following Articles, Viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of the Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



♦indicates Candidate for re-election 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
April 5, 1988 



Pet 1 



Pet 2 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



SELECTMAN (2) 3 yrs. 

Bonita Towle* 
Bradford O. Emerson 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

ASSESSOR 3 yrs. 
Richard P. Tevlin 
Joseph B. Shanahan Sr. 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

BOARD OF HEALTH 3 yrs 

Paul E McCarthy* 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 3 yrs 

Nicholas G. Gavriel* 
Barbara H. Ward 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

LIBRARY TRUSTEE 3 yrs (2) 

Susan G. Cantin* 
Mark W. Gauthier* 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

PARK COMMISSIONER 3 yrs **write-in candidates 

Robert L. Wetmore** 

Walter L. Kivlan HI*' 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 3 yrs 
Everett V. Olsen* 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 5 yrs 

Robert L. Hughes* 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



PLANNING BOARD 3 yrs (3) 

James P. Good 

Rosaline M. Boyle* 

Kim J. MacKenzie* 

Christine A. Gleason 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

SEWER COMMISIONER 3 yrs 

Barry B. Balan* 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

CHARTER COMMISSION MEMBERS (9) 

Paul F. Ahern 
Cheryl A. Boss 
Robert R. Charpentier 
William F. Dalton 
Phyllis M. Elias 
James M. Geary Jr. 
Robert P. Joyce 
Mary Ann Koulas 
David J. McLachlan 
Thomas D. Miskell 
John W. Peters 
Frederick H. Reid 
Patricia A. Saber 



1664 



832 



832 



1664 



832 



2496 



589 
243 



832 



1436 



718 



718 



1436 



718 



2154 



502 
216 



718 



Pet 8 



1796 



1684 



1916 



1868 



2212 



1592 



898 



842 



958 



934 



1106 



796 



898 



842 



958 



934 



1106 



796 



1796 



1684 



1916 



1868 



2212 



1592 



842 



958 



934 



1106 



796 



2694 



637 
261 



2526 



581 
261 



2874 



630 
328 



2802 



674 
260 



3318 



721 
385 



2388 



537 
259 



898 



842 



958 



934 



1106 



796 



Pet 9 



1848 



924 



924 



1848 



924 



2772 



618 
306 



924 



Total 



541 


426 


575 


551 


571 


588 


646 


480 


573 


4951 


508 


457 


539 


515 


579 


594 


673 


475 


543 


4883 





2 








4 


1 


3 








10 


615 


551 


682 


618 


762 


685 


890 


637 


732 


6172 



16016 



374 


310 


440 


373 


447 


368 


485 


350 


545 


3692 


361 


310 


330 


379 


379 


429 


435 


327 


294 


3244 


97 


98 


128 


90 


132 


137 


186 


119 


85 


1072 



8008 



615 


532 


665 


632 


705 


688 


766 


593 


662 


5858 


217 


186 


233 


210 


253 


246 


340 


203 


262 


2150 


832 


718 


898 


842 


958 


934 


1106 


796 


924 


8008 


311 


256 


299 


318 


297 


341 


384 


281 


317 


2804 


447 


383 


511 


433 


591 


500 


603 


444 


530 


4442 


74 


79 


88 


91 


70 


93 


119 


71 


77 


762 



8008 



514 


451 


578 


554 


574 


597 


659 


473 


587 


4987 


525 


460 


584 


536 


570 


594 


687 


496 


553 


5005 


625 


525 


634 


594 


772 


677 


866 


623 


708 


6024 



16016 



8 


26 


27 


7 


31 


8 


19 


38 


8 


172 


8 





19 


126 


24 


175 


7 


19 


8 


386 


2 


8 


4 


1 


6 


3 


11 


2 


2 


39 


814 


684 


848 


708 


897 


748 


1069 


737 


906 


7411 


832 


718 


898 


842 


958 


934 


1106 


796 


924 


8008 


582 


536 


662 


606 


645 


665 


743 


565 


625 


5629 














1 


1 











2 


250 


182 


236 


236 


312 


268 


363 


231 


299 


2377 



8008 



551 


478 


619 


574 


618 


640 


687 


523 


578 


5268 














1 














1 


281 


240 


279 


268 


339 


294 


419 


273 


346 


2739 


832 


718 


898 


842 


958 


934 


1106 


796 


924 


8008 


483 


386 


483 


473 


550 


554 


603 


432 


593 


4557 


339 


288 


425 


351 


405 


432 


481 


365 


400 


3486 


393 


350 


434 


384 


477 


481 


548 


367 


445 


3879 


419 


368 


526 


433 


511 


481 


539 


443 


476 


4196 














1 














1 


862 


762 


826 


885 


930 


854 


1147 


781 


858 


7905 



24024 



5489 
2519 



8008 



323 


238 


325 


306 


407 


303 


383 


279 


342 


2906 


238 


195 


321 


281 


311 


282 


281 


312 


247 


2568 


252 


198 


285 


254 


228 


350 


308 


218 


251 


2344 


190 


187 


188 


180 


178 


193 


178 


180 


148 


1622 


254 


177 


271 


248 


384 


268 


374 


243 


370 


2589 


370 


283 


405 


346 


383 


460 


511 


360 


368 


3486 


353 


147 


181 


228 


217 


220 


234 


172 


303 


2055 


232 


178 


241 


237 


306 


258 


381 


223 


237 


2293 


249 


155 


228 


224 


289 


321 


337 


231 


220 


2254 


133 


253 


185 


157 


133 


140 


126 


220 


122 


1469 


200 


155 


259 


198 


220 


319 


361 


199 


236 


2147 


274 


232 


243 


276 


384 


311 


306 


238 


243 


2507 


188 


122 


158 


164 


241 


161 


177 


152 


296 


1659 



Pet 1 



Pet 2 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



Pet 9 



Total 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Jonathan C. Stubbs 
John T. Warren 
Cheryl Warshafsky 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 1 

Yes 
No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 2 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 
TOTAL 

QUESTION 3 

Yes 
No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 4 

Yes 
No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

QUESTION 5 

Yes 
No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



443 


374 


494 


448 


422 


545 


576 


416 


473 


4191 


129 


113 


213 


96 


135 


122 


182 


130 


140 


1260 


240 


173 


201 


317 


268 


325 


259 


207 


263 


2253 


226 


181 


261 


252 


338 


298 


328 


229 


284 


2397 


3194 


3101 


3623 


3366 


3778 


3530 


4552 


3155 


3773 


32072 


7488 


6462 


8082 


7578 


8622 


8406 


9954 


7164 


8316 


72072 


337 


215 


433 


269 


432 


372 


507 


319 


395 


3279 


479 


491 


455 


560 


512 


549 


590 


463 


516 


4615 


16 


12 


10 


13 


14 


13 


9 


14 


13 


114 


832 


718 


898 


842 


958 


934 


1106 


796 


924 


8008 


313 


202 


400 


268 


385 


362 


484 


263 


390 


3067 


506 


507 


482 


555 


551 


556 


604 


509 


520 


4790 


13 


9 


16 


19 


22 


16 


18 


24 


14 


151 


832 


718 


898 


842 


958 


934 


1106 


796 


924 


8008 


308 


197 


400 


254 


370 


365 


491 


268 


399 


3052 


503 


504 


470 


560 


561 


545 


592 


506 


503 


4744 


21 


17 


28 


28 


27 


24 


23 


22 


22 


212 


832 


718 


898 


842 


958 


934 


1106 


796 


924 


8008 


528 


329 


570 


424 


563 


567 


686 


427 


569 


4663 


259 


347 


272 


372 


334 


319 


344 


313 


303 


2863 


45 


42 


56 


46 


61 


48 


76 


56 


52 


482 


832 


718 


898 


842 


958 


934 


1106 


796 


924 


8008 


500 


239 


554 


431 


595 


567 


706 


372 


585 


4549 


289 


450 


294 


368 


298 


312 


327 


373 


290 


3001 


43 


29 


50 


43 


65 


55 


73 


51 


49 


458 



832 



718 



898 



842 



958 



934 



1106 



796 



924 



8008 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 25, 1988 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the 
McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium at 8:00 PM, by the 
Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 532 voters present. 

Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and posting of the war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman 
Ready moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator then asked permission from the Town 
Meeting body to allow Bernard Lynch, Thomas Carroll, 
and William Mullen to speak when necessary. These peo- 
ple are non-residents who work for the Town and may have 
to explain an article. Motion carried. 

The Moderator then pointed out the fire exits, and ex- 
plained that the newly-elected Charter Commissioners had 
passed out a survey form, he asked the Body to fill it out 
and return it to the boxes so marked. The Moderator than 
read a list of the Students elected as participants to the 
April 28, 1988 Student Government Day activities. They 
are as follows 



Board of Selectman 
Mark Gilboard 
Peter Hocknell 
Scott Nussbum 
Craig Richardson 
Heid White 

Town Clerk 
Paul Ricciardi 



State Senator 
Kevin Groman 

Board of Assessors 
Bobo Cruickshank 
Michelle Kaczowka 
Karen McClure 

Housing Authority 
Kim Marsella 
Lauren Thomas 

Police Chief 
Ryan Kuchler 
Beth Scoville, Ass't. 



Board of Health 
Alison Adamian 
Christopher Chew 
Stacey Kelley 



School Commmittee 
Stacey Hallal 
Shannon Barry 
John Duggan 
Leslie Kraham 
David Regan 

State Representative 
Katy Wood 

Planning Board 
Rick Burtt 
Cathy Kaczowka 
Dawn Wholey 

Town Accountant 
Jack Wang 



Fire Chief 
David Beaton 
Frank Sorracco, Ass't 



10 



Supt. of Streets 
Jennifer Simard 

Wiring Inspector 
Gregg Silver 

Supt. of Public Buildings 
Ben King 

Exec. Sec. Bd. of 
Selectmen 
Tricia Olenshak 

Finance Commmittee 
Jason Howard 
Sonal Shah 
Mick Mecuri 

Town Engineer 
Anjali Sharma 



Library Trustees 
Jenny Atkinson 
Inna Makovoz 



Cemetery Supt. 
Michael Smith 

Building Inspector 
Don Hearn 

Supt. of Schools 
Mary Dukakis 



Town Aide 
Nancy Shaw 

Veteran's Agent 
Kim Corcoran 



Sewer Commissioners 
John Edwards 
Julie Lee 
Dana Klayner 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 
Neil Costa 



The Students were present and given a round of ap- 
plause. A moment of silence was asked for by the 
Moderator, in honor of Claude A. Harvey, who passed away 
August 14, 1987. At various times Mr. Harvey held the 
elected office of Selectman, Assessor, Member of the Hous- 
ing Authority, and other appointed offices. The Moderator 
then explained the Town Meeting procedure to the voters 
present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Dennis J. Ready mov- 
ed that the Town hear reports of the Town Officers and 
Committees. 

Selectman Ready moved to hear nominations from the 
floor for the Varney Playground Commission. Motion car- 
ried. Selectman Ready moved to nominate Donald T 
Wholey for a three year term. The Moderator asked for 
any more nominations, hearing none he declared that 
nominations were closed. The Moderator then asked for 
a voice vote on Donald T. Wholey as commissioner for three 
years, it was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator moved to recess the Annual Town 
Meeting at 8:10 PM in order to conduct a Public Budget 
Hearing of Federal Revenue Sharing Funds. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

Dwight Hayward, Chairman of the Finance Committee 
discussed the Federal Revenue Sharing amount. The 
amount is $7200.00 and it is the interest from the monies 
received over the years. It will be used in fiscal year 
1988-1989, and should be allocated to the salary line item 
under the Highway Department. He then moved that the 
sum $7200.00 be used to reduce the salary account of the 
Highway Department. The Moderator asked for any discus- 
sion or questions, hearing none, he asked for a voice vote, 
motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked if there 



was any further discussion needed. Hearing none, he 
declared the meeting closed, and reconvened the Annual 
Town Meeting at 8:15 PM. 

Dwight Hayward then gave a brief explanation of the 
Town's financial situation, and the Finance Committee's 
position. 

William Dalton presented to James Harrington, Town 
Counsel a proposal used by the Town of Tewksbury con- 
cerning the order of articles being taken up on the night 
of Town Meeting, (lottery system). He felt that this would 
avoid special interest groups appearing on the night that 
"their article" was to be voted. He asked that Town Counsel 
report at the next adjourned meeting if this system could 
be used for Chelmsford. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Alan Murphy, Chairman of the 
Personnel Board explained the different areas that were 
going to be amended within this by-law. The Finance Com- 
mittee and the Board of Selectmen both recommended the 
article. William Dalton asked questions concerning the 
wording of the article and the need for a Personnel Direc- 
tor at this time, considering the financial situation. Select- 
man Bradford Emerson felt that this would become an ex- 
pensive department down the road once the funding of a 
state grant was over. Was there really a need? Selectman 
Roger Blomgren explained that this position was necessary. 
He showed graphics which broke down the job description 
showing the areas where money would be saved in the long 
run. He then moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, which left the chair in 
doubt, he then asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. 
James Doukszwicz, Town Treasurer, spoke in favor of the 
Personnel Director. His office handles the medical in- 
surance via payroll deduction for all the Town Employees, 
plus all the retired Town Employees who make over the 
counter payments. Any notice of increases or change in the 
policies are also sent from his office. This is very time con- 
suming and is an area that the Personnel Director should 
handle. Richard Jerome spoke against the line item, how- 
ever he felt that perhaps the Selectmen may want to amend 
the article to read that the position would only be for one 
year to see if the need is really there. Selectman Ready said 
that the grant requires the Town vote to fund 25% of the 
salary this year. Next year the town would have to vote to 
fund 50% of the salary. At that time the voters could decide 
if the need is there. Selectman Johnson said that the need 
is there, however the Town just cannot afford to hire an 
individual at this time when we will be laying off other 
employees. A voice vote was taken on the article, motion 
defeated. Norman LeBrecque moved to reconsider the ar- 
ticle. The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of reconsideration. Alan Murphy spoke in favor. 
A voice vote was taken motion carried. Selectman Johnson 
moved to delete Line item 15 in section 5 Human Resource 
Director. The Finance Committee was against the motion. 
A voice vote was taken, motion defeated. The voice vote 
was questioned. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. The show of hands was questioned, an ac- 
tual hand count was requested. The following tellers came 
forward and a hand count was taken: 

Jocelyn Anthony David McLachlan Norman LeBrecque 



11 



Margaret Johnson 
Edward Hilliard 
Walter Cleven 



Jane Drury 
Michael Anthony 



Linda Allen 
Jack Peters 
Judy Haas 



result: Yes 228 No 175 motion carried to amend. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the main mo- 
tion as amended, motion carried. 



Amend under section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates of Wages and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" by adding the follow- 
ing positions: 

Administrative & Clerical 
15. Human Resources Director 
19. Assessor- Part Time 



Alan Murphy moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Personnel Wage and Salary By-Law to be effective July 1, 
1988 as follows: 

1. Under Section 6, "Classification of Town Employees," 
amend Subsection (E)— "Wage and Salary Schedule" 
by deleting the existing schedule and substituting the 
following: 

E. WAGE AND SALARY SCHEDULE 
JULY 1, 1988-JUNE 30, 1989 
Grade Level Salary Range 

1 $ 8,070 - $10,047 

1A 13,108 - 16,319 

IB 14,816 - 18,446 

1C 16,526 - 20,575 

ID 19,945 - 24,832 

2 25,075 - 31,218 

3 33,623 - 41,861 

4 38,753 - 48,248 

5 43,884 - 54,636 

2. Amend under Section 8 subtitled "Increases Within 
Grade Levels and Promotions" by adding a new 
paragraph (E): 

(E) The total number of employees receiving more 
than a one step merit increase during the fiscal 
year shall not exceed 5 percent of the number 
of all employees under the jurisdiction of the Per- 
sonnel Board. 

3. Amend under section 7 subtitled "Hiring of New 
Employees" by adding a new paragraph (C): 

(C) Part-time clerks to the Personnel Board, Historic 
District Commission, Finance Committee, Cable 
TV Commission, Traffic and Safety Committee 
and Council of Aging may be employed by the 
Town without a medical examination. 

4. Amend under section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates of Wages and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" by deleting the follow- 
ing positions: 

Administrative & Clerical 

15. Administrative Assistant to The Planning Board 

Recreation 

1. Director/ Youth Center 

2. Clerk, Part-Time 

6. Playground Supervisor 

9. Youth Center Supervisor 

10. Youth Center Leader 



6. Amend under section 24 subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates of Wages and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" by the renumbering 
the following positions: 

Recreation 

1. Waterfront Director 

2. Swimming Instructor 

3. Lifeguard 

5. Recreation Specialist 

6. Recreation Leader 

and adding the following position: 

Recreation 

4. Program Supervisor 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A Alan Murphy, Chairman of the 
Personnel Board explained the article. The Library Direc- 
tor was being increased a level to reflect the start of the 
proposed three year program to upgrade salaries within the 
Library Department. The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article as presented. 
Discussion followed. Alan Murphy moved to delete line 
item 15 Human Resources Director under Administrative 
and Clerical. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the amendment. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote 
on the main motion as amended. Motion carried. Article 
2 A reads as follows: 

Alan Murphy, Chairman of the Personnel Board mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-law by further amending Section 24, "Job Titles 
and Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Person- 
nel Wage and Salary By-Law" to conform to rates to pay 
negotiated by the Town with certain labor organizations, 
pursuant to General Laws Chapter 150E, and to reflect cur- 
rent salaries and grade levels under the Personnel By-Law 
as follows: 







7/87 


7/88 


7/88 


6/89 


DM 


Current 
Level 
INISTRATIVE & CLERICAL 


Current 
Salary 


Proposed 
Level 


Proposed 
Salary 


1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 


Executive Secretary 
Town Accountant 
Veteran's Agent 
Council on Aging Director 


5 
3 
2 
2 




5 
3 
2 
2 




5. 


Assistant to Assessors 


ID 




ID 




6. 


Assistant Town Clerk 


2 




2 




7. 


Assistant Treasurer 


2 




2 




8 


Clerk. Senior 


1C 




1C 




9. 


Clerk. Junior 


1C 




1C 




10. 


Clerk. Part Time 


1A 




1A 




11 
12 


Town Counsel 

Board of Reg. . Three 

Members 


$500 PA. 
J500 EA. 




$500 PA. 
$500 EA. 




13. 


Assistant Town Accountant 


2 




2 




M 


Admin. Assistant to the Ex- 










15. 


ecutive Secretary 

Human Resources Director 


ID 




ID 
3 




16 
17. 


Town Clerk 

Town Treasurer/Collector 


3 
3 




3 
3 




18 


Assessor 


3 




3 





12 



CONSERVATION, PARKS & CEMETERY 



1. Cemetery Superintendent 


2 


2. Supt. of Insect and Pest 




Control 


$1,250 PA 


3. Landscaper — Park 


1A 


4. Laborer— Park 


1A 


5. Unskilled Laborer 


#2. #3 


6. Skilled Forest 




Workman — Conservation 


1A 


7. Equipment Operator 


1C 


8. Park Superintendent 


2 


CUSTODIAL 




1. Custodian 


IB 


LIBRARY 




1. Library Director 


3 


2. Library Department Head 


ID 


3. Library Specialists 


1C 


4. Library Assistant 


IB 


5. Library Clerk 


1A 


6. Maintenance Assistant 


IB 


7. Page 


#2. #3 


8 Library Assistant Director 


2 


9. Maintenance Specialist 


1C 


HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 




1. Highway Superintendent 


3 


2. Highway Foreman 


2 


TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 




1 Fire Chief 


#2 


2. Deputy Fire Chief 


4 


3. Captain 


#2 


4. Truck Mechanic (Fire and 




Police) 


2 


5. Auto Mechanic (Fire and 




Police) 


ID 


TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 




1. Police Chief 


5 


2. Deputy Chief 


4 


3. Captain 


3 



4 . Trainee 

RECREATION 

1. Waterfront Director 

2. Swimming Instructor 

3. Lifeguard 

4. Program Supervisor 

5. Recreation Specialist 
6 Recreation Leader 

OTHER POSITION 

1. Building Inspector 

2. Electric Inspector 

3. Local Inspector 

4. Gas Inspector 

5. Dog Officer 

6. Assistant Dog Officer 

7. Van Driver 



3 
2 

2 

«2 
ID 
1A 
IB 



8. Sealer of Weights & Measures #2 



Animal Inspector 

Clock Winder 

Town Engineer 

Assistant Town Engineer 

Respite Core Program 

Director 

Home Delivered Meals 

Coordinator 

Superintendent of Buildings 

Senior Citizens Activities 

Coordinator 



IB 



$8,500 PA. 



$2,000 PA. 
$1,000 PA. 
$ 200 PA. 



$1,250 PA. 
1A 
1A 

#2. #3 

1A 
1C 

2 



4 

ID 
1C 
IB 

1A 
IB 

#2, #3 

2 

1C 



*2 
4 
*2 

2 

ID 



LA 

LA 
LA 

IB 
LA 

1A 



3 

2 

2 

*2 

ID 

IB 

IB 

#2 

#2 

Wi 

3 

2 



IB 



$8,500 PA. 



$2,000 PA. 
$1,000 PA. 
$ 200 PA. 



FOOTNOTES 

#1 — Represented by Collective Bargaining 

#2 -Not in Job Rating Plan" 

#3-$4.25/Hr. first year, $4.75/Hr. second year. $5.25/Hr. third year 



UNDER ARTICLE 3 Raymond McCusker, petitioner, 
explained that due to the financial situation of the Town 
he moved to withdraw this article and the next two. Mo- 
tion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Raymond McCusker moved to 
withdraw this article. Motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Raymond McCusker moved to 
withdraw this article. Motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 James Doukszewicz, Town Trea- 
surer moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate, 



the sum of $22,500.00 to engage a private accounting firm 
to prepare an audit of all accounts and all departments 
in the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen recom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved 
to dismiss this article. 

Selectman Ready explained that there were no previous 
years bills. The Finance Committee recommended the ar- 
ticle. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 D. Lorraine Lambert, Chairman 
of the Library Trustees, moved to dismiss this article. 

David McLachlan explained that the Library Building 
Committee could not at this time purchase land to expand 
the Library onto. Due to the question failing on the April 
5th Town Election ballot asking to be allowed to be exempt 
from Proposition 2V4- The Finance Committee and the 
Board of Selectmen recommended dismissal. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 D. Lorraine Lambert, Chairman 
of the Library Trustees, moved to dismiss this article. 

Susan Cantin, Library Trustee explained that the 
Library Trustees will come back in the future asking to ex- 
pand the present library facilities. The Finance Commit- 
tee and Board of Selectmen were in favor of the dismissal. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Paul Canniff, Chairman of the 
Board of Health, moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $200,000.00 for the completion of 
the closure plan of the Swain Road Landfill, including 
loaming and seeding: Groundwater monitoring and sampl- 
ing as required by the Department of Environmental Quali- 
ty Engineering (DEQE); Combustible gas monitoring as 
required by DEQE; and miscellaneous site work not 
previously anticipated; and that the Board of Health be 
authorized to apply for, accept and expend any state and 
federal grants and local monies that may be available for 
the project. 

John Emerson of the Board of Health, explained that 
this was the final phase of the closing of the dump. If this 
work is not done then the town could be subject to a 
$1,000.00 a day fine. The Finance Committee supported 
the motion. The Board of Selectmen recommend the ar- 
ticle. A discussion took place. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Raymond McKeon, Chief of 
Police, moved to dismiss this article. 

Chief McKeon spoke about the article. He explained that 
the Traffic Control Unit has been effective. Drivers are be- 
ing forced to watch their speed. And a majority of the traf- 
fic violations are out of town drivers. Revenues are coming 
in as a result of this. However, due to the financial condi- 
tion of the Town this unit must be dissolved as of June 30th. 



13 



The Finance Committee supported the motion to dismiss. 
The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion. Mo- 
tion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 Raymond McKeon, Chief of 
Police, moved that the Town vote to transfer and ap- 
propriate from the Stabilization Fund the sum of 
$45,000.00 for the purpose of purchasing 3 police cruisers 
for the Police Department and to sell by good and suffi- 
cient bill of sale five (5) obsolete vehicles; and moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
negotiate and execute all necessary and proper contracts 
and agreements thereto, and all contracts to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen. 

The Finance Committee recommended the motion. The 
Board of Selectmen recommended the article. A discussion 
took place. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which 
left the chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken, %'s vote required. Yes 346, No 4, 
%'s equals 252, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 John Emerson, Chairman of the 
Sewer Commission, moved to amend the article Line item 
15 as follows: Delete the present wording of Drainage 
Facilities Plan Study Work and add in its place Drainage 
Projects and related studies thereto. James Doukszewicz 
Capital Planning Chairman moved to amend the article. 
The first two line items should read Asbestos removal 
McCarthy auditorium $125,000.00 and Asbestos materials 
study plan for all bldgs. $52,500.00. A lengthy dicussion 
took place concerning the other line items in this article. 
Carl Olsson, Chairman of the School Committee explained 
the $160,000.00 needed for the repairing the boys locker 
room at the High School. Neil Doherty questioned the ex- 
pense of the Library's computer. James Doukszewicz ex- 
plained the line item. Mr. Doherty also questioned the 
School Computers lines. Thomas Carroll of the School 
Department explained that the Vax system needed to be 
updated. This additional drive would improve the present 
system. As for the terminals, repairs have been done in the 
past, now they needed to be replaced. The cost of traffic 
lights installed at Hunt/ Littleton Road was questioned. 
James Doukszewicz explained that it was a dangerous in- 
tersection, there had already been one fatality. The Town 
could be held liable in the future if this intersection was 
not improved. A number of residents of the area spoke in 
favor. William Dalton of the Traffic Safety Committee 
asked for support of the line item. More discussion follow- 
ed. Barry Balan moved the question. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to amend the Sewer Department's line item. Mo- 
tion Carried. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to amend the School's first two line item figures. 
Motion carried. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on 
the main motion as amended in its entirety. This left the 
Chair in doubt. A unanimous vote or %'s hand vote is need- 
ed. The Teller's came forward and a hand count was taken: 
Yes 244, No 31, %'s was 184, motion carried. The article 
reads as follows: 

James Doukszewicz, Chairman of the Capital Planning 
Committee moved that the Town vote to appropriate the 
sum of $1,711,575.00 for the following capital projects: 



Dept. 


Item 


Cost 




Approximation 


School 


Asbestos removal McCarthy Auditorium 


$125,000.00 


School 


Asbestos materials study plan for all 






bldgs. 


52,500.00 


School 


Handicap accessibility to inner bldg. 
areas at Westland, Harrington, Parker, 






High School 


35,000.00 


School 


Boys locker room at high school repairs 


160,000.00 


School 


McCarthy roofs recoated 


7,500.00 


School 


Student furniture replaced (500 units) 


30,000.00 


School 


Panic hardware replaced at five schools 


60,000.00 


School 


Parker gym floor replaced 


75,000.00 


School 


PA. control boards replaced at Byam & 






So. Row 


15,000.00 


School 


Carpeting/title work in open classroom 






area (Byam) 


50,000.00 


School 


Reseal H.V.A.C. units on room at high 






school 


18,000.00 


School 


Drainage and paving work in washed out 






area at Byam 


35,000.00 


School 


Add disc drive to Vax system 


18,000.00 


School 


Computer terminals in math lab. /some 






administrative terminals replaced too 


35,000.00 


Sewer 


Drainage projects and related studies 


165,000.00 


Sewer 


Office computer equipment 7 maint. 






contract 


67,500.00 


Fire 


Mobil radios replaced 


10,000.00 


Fire 


Service truck replaced 


20,000.00 


Traffic Safety Lights at Hunt Rd. /Littleton Rd. 






installed 


120,000.00 


Traffic Safety Improvements at Golden Cove 






Rd./Billerica Rd. 


20,000.00 


Selectmen 


Central telephone system at town ofc. 






building 


40,000.00 


Highway 


Street resurfacing work 


426,000.00 


Highway 


Diesel 4 whl. drive backhoe 


60,000.00 


Highway 


Diesel dump truck 


47,000.00 


Library 


Computer for administrative use 


8,000.00 


Cemetery 


Replace 4 whl. drive tractor/loader 


12,075.00 




TOTAL 


$1,711,575.00 



and I move that the Town vote to authorize the Treasurer, 
to borrow the sum of $1,711,575.00 to fund these obliga- 
tions with the approval of the Selectmen, pursuant to 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7. 

Selectman Ready moved to adjourm the meeting to Mon- 
day evening May 1, 1988, 7:30 PM to the McCarthy Mid- 
dle School Gymnasium. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
meeting adjourned at 11:15 PM. 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 2, 1988 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:40 PM at the McCarthy Middle School Gym- 
nasium, by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 445 voters 
present. 



14 



The Moderator reminded the voters present where the 
fire exits were located. Selectman Dennis Ready moved to 
allow Bernard Lynch, Thomas Carroll and William Mullen 
who are non-residents to speak from time to time. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
to table this article and refer it to the Charter Commission 
to be included as part of the Charter. Dwight Hayward, 
Chairman of the Finance Committee said the committee 
was against the motion. They felt that the question has 
been voted at the recent Town Election to form a Public 
Works Department and that this article should be acted 
upon. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to table the article, motion defeated. The Moderator 
then asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. 
The Finance Committee felt that the proponents of the ar- 
ticle should speak first, then they would give their recom- 
mendation. Selectman Roger Blomgren spoke about the 
article. He thanked the School Committee, Finance Com- 
mittee and Representative Carol Cleven for their help and 
support of the article. He felt that consolidation of these 
departments were best for the future of the Town. This is 
based on a report which was done by Bennett and Shaw. 
The Town would be able to maintain the present quality 
of service of these departments without cutting back. Cost 
wise it would be better. Equipment will be shared within 
the departments. Selectman Blomgren explained that a 
report done by Bennett & Shaw made a number of other 
recommendations for the Town to follow. The Finance 
Committee supported the article. They felt that this is what 
the people in town wanted. Before the Moderator acknow- 
ledged any other voters, he made a point of order. Any voter 
after speaking on an article, would not be allowed to move 
the question to end debate, after speaking. Everett Olsen, 
a member of the Cemetery Commission, moved to exclude 
the Cemetery Commission from this article. He said the 
study that was done in 1978 on the possibility of forming 
a DPW stated that the Cemetery Department shouldn't be 
included under the DPW. He said that the Commission 
has been established since 1890. Mass. General Laws 
Chapter 114, specify the duties of the Commission. The 
Commission is in charge of the perpetual care account 
which can only be used by them. The Finance Committee 
is against the motion to delete. The Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the motion. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, which left the Chair in doubt. He then asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried. More discussion took 
place. When would this go into effect? Under whose 
jurisdiction would the Department come under. The Select- 
men explained that once it was passed, it would go on to 
the Legislature for approval, if approved by them, then 
it would come back to the Town Meeting for a final vote. 
The Board of Selectmen would be in charge of the DPW. 
They would appoint a person to be in charge of the depart- 
ment. It was questioned that perhaps further study should 
be done before voting. Selectmen Bradford Emerson said 
that because of these questions and others this is the reason 
why a majority of the Selectmen want to table the article. 
Cheryl Boss of the Finance Committee questioned why the 
Board after first recommending the article now want to 
table it. Selectman Blomgren explained that he was on the 
minority of the Board who wanted to table this. He felt 



that the people in town voted in favor of consolidation, and 
that the Selectmen and Town Meeting body should vote 
for it. If voted, then the Selectmen would have one year 
to iron out the problems and prepare a budget showing 
exactly what would be involved via personnel and expenses. 
At that time the Town Meeting could decide if they really 
wanted to consolidate. Michael Anthony moved the ques- 
tion to stop debate. Motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion as 
amended, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the Town vote to 
direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the Great and 
General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
enact Special Legislation establishing a Town of Chelms- 
ford Public Works Department, said department consisting 
of the following departments: 

Highway Department 

Engineering Department 

Recreation Department 

Public Buildings Department 

Tree Warden 

Sewer Commission (Year 2005) 

Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District (when 
terminated pursuant to special act which created said 
District) 

Park Department with said Public Works. Depart- 
ment being organized pursuant to a report prepared 
by Bennett and Shaw Inc. Management Consultants 
entitled "FEASIBILITY STUDY OF A CON- 
SOLIDATED PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
FOR JANUARY 12, 1988. Said bill, when approved 
by the Legislature and signed into law by the Gover- 
nor, to be approved in its final form by the voters at 
an Annual or Special Town Meeting in order for it 
to be implemented; 

Dennis McHugh, Moderator made a point of order. Due 
to being the Legal Counsel for the North Chelmsford Water 
Commission, he was stepping down as Moderator. He 
nominated James Harrington, Town Counsel as Acting 
Moderator for this article. Motion carried. James Harr- 
ington came forward and was sworn in by the Town Clerk 
Mary E. St.Hilaire. 



UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Roger Blomgren ex- 
plained the article and presented facts and figures in sup- 
port of the article. The Finance Committee was in favor 
of the article. Especially due to the fact a non-binding ques- 
tion was placed on the April 5th Town Election and passed. 
Plus the sewer department will be going on line soon and 
this would avoid duplicating services. James Geary, repre- 
senting the Center Water District asked about legal issues 
that would effect that district as well as the East and North 



15 



Water Districts. The districts have been established since 
1930, 1933 and 1935 and the districts have worked well in 
serving the inhabitants. He also stated that in October 1973, 
Town Counsel at that time, Clement McCarthy gave an opi- 
nion outlining to the Board of Selectmen areas of consolida- 
tion. Those steps mentioned in 1973 should be followed 
now. He pointed out that it is necessary for the inhabitants 
of each district to vote at their annual meetings to approve 
any future merger. This was done in 1982-1983 when the 
South merged with the Center district. The actual vote took 
place in January and February 1984. The financial situa- 
tion of merging was questioned. The districts have different 
expenses. Does Proposition 2V6 come into this? John Emer- 
son, Chairman of the Sewer Commission, spoke in favor 
of this. Due to sewerage soon starting, centralize billing will 
be needed to be done. The water supply belongs to everyone 
in Town. It should not be divided by districts. The Town 
would be better having one district under the Town's 
jurisdiction charging the same rate. Ronald Wetmore, 
Treasurer of the Center Water District, spoke against the 
article. He explained that the Center Disttrict has improved 
its services, it has invested in a computer system that will 
be able to handle any an all billing. All the water districts 
now help each other out via equipment use etc. This in- 
cludes surrounding Towns and the City of Lowell. A lengthy 
discussion took place. Voters spoke for and against the con- 
solidation. Peter Lawlor of the Finance Committee spoke 
in favor. Jacob Sartz, Commissioner of the East District and 
Bruce Clark, Commissioner of the North District, spoke 
against the article. Joe Erbacher moved the question to stop 
debate. Motion carried. The Moderator attempted to voice 
vote which left the chair in doubt. The following tellers 
came forward and a hand count was taken: 



Margaret Johnson 
Norman LeBrecque 
Jane Drury 
Lynn Marcella 



Jocelyn Anthony 
Michael Anthony 
John Carson 
Jonathan Stubbs 



Walter Cleven 
Jean Horgan 
Judy Hass 



Result of the hand count: Yes 189, No 178, the motion car- 
ried. Voters questioned the hand count. The Tellers were 
called back and conducted another hand count. Yes 187, 
No 179, the motion carried. 

The article reads as follows: 



DEPARTMENT FOR THE TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 
MASSACHUSETTS, JANUARY 12, 1988. Said bill, when 
approved by the Legislature and signed into law by the 
Governor, to be approved in its final form by the voters 
at an Annual or Special Town Meeeting in order for it to 
be implemented. 

Edward Marshall moved that the meeting adjourn un- 
til 7:30 PM Monday evening May 9, 1988, at the McCar- 
thy Middle School Gymnasium. Motion carried. The 
meeting adjourned at 10:25 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 9, 1988 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:35 PM at the McCarthy Middle School Gym- 
nasium, by the Moderator Dennis McHugh who recognized 
the presence of a quorum. There were 478 voters present. 

The Moderator reminded voters of the location of the 
fire exits and where to leave the Charter Commission survey 
forms. He also asked permission from the Town Meeting 
body to allow Bernard Lynch, Thomas Carroll, William 
Mullen, who are non-residents to speak from time to time. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

Dwight Hayward, Chairman of the Finance Committee, 
moved to take articles 18, 19, and 20 out of order. Due to 
a Special Town Meeting being posted to start at 8:00 PM, 
the budget is the next article to come up. These articles 
do not involve any money therefore they could be acted 
on prior to the special. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried. 



Selectman Dennis Ready moved that the town vote to 
direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the Great and 
General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
enact Special Legislation to (1) abolish the three (3) Water 
Districts currently existing in the Town of Chelmsford 
known as the North Chelmsford Water District, Chelmsford 
Water District, a/k/a Chelmsford Center Water District, 
and East Chelmsford Water District and transfer all Assets 
and Debts thereto to the newly-created Chelmsford Water 
Department as hereinafter established and (2) to create a 
single entity to be known as the Chelmsford Water Depart- 
ment operating under the control of Town Meeting, which 
would have the right to establish rates and budgets, 
authorized bonding, take property and determine organiza- 
tion, all as pursuant to a report prepared by Bennett and 
Shaw, Inc. Management Consultants entitled "FEASIBILI- 
TY STUDY OF A CONSOLIDATED PUBLIC WORKS 



UNDER ARTICLE 18 James Doukszewicz, moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, to enter 
into compensating balance agreements, during fiscal 1989, 
as permitted by General Laws Chapter 41, Section 53F 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
purpose of the article is to permit the Treasurer to main- 
tain compensating balances in exchange for services re- 
ceived. He cited as an example the payroll processing 
charges are at no cost to the Town from the bank where 
our deposit of funds are. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 James Doukszewicz, Town Treas- 
urer, moved that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 



16 



revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1988, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, and to issue a note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17 and 17(a). 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 John F. McCarthy, Chairman of 
the Planning Board moved that the Town vote to amend 
the Chelmsford Zoning By-Law by deleting the present zon- 
ing map and substituting the redrafted map proposed by 
the Planning Board, as filed with the Town Clerk, and dis- 
played at the Annual Town Meeting. 

James Harrington, Town Counsel explained that this ar- 
ticle is to make a correction on the zoning map. A small 
area in South Chelmsford (the Sunoco Gas Station on Ac- 
ton Road) was inadvertently zoned (P) Public when it 
should have been left as (CB) Roadside. 

The Moderator read the Planning Board's recommen- 
dation, submitted by John F. McCarthy, Chairman. "The 
Planning Board held a public hearing on April 13, 1988 
and voted in favor (6-0) of the proposal to amending the 
zoning by-laws and zoning map from (P) Public to Road- 
side (CB)." 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

James Harrington, Town Counsel, moved to take Articles 
21, 22, 23, and 24 out of order at this time to be acted 
on prior to the Special Town Meeting scheduled for 8:00 
PM. The Finance Committee. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 The Moderator read the article. 
He then asked for the Finance Committees recommenda- 
tion. Dwight Hayward explained that the Committee would 
like to hear the petitioner's explanation first. The 
Moderator asked for the petitioner to come forward and 
speak and explain the purpose of petition. The petitioner 
was not present, therefore the Finance Committee did not 
recommend the article. A voice vote was taken, motion 
defeated, (this was reconsidered see after art. 28) 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 The Moderator read the article. 
He then asked the petitioner to come forward and explain 
the purpose of wanting the land. Seeing that no one came 
forward, the Finance Committee recommended not to ac- 
cept the article. Motion defeated by voice vote, (this was 
reconsidered see after art. 26) 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men, for consideration to be determined to convey and 
transfer all rights, title and interest, if any held by the 
Town, in a certain parcel of land on Elton Road, shown 
as Lots 3 46 and 47, on Assessors' Map 45. 

The Moderator asked the petitioner to come forward and 
explain the purpose of wanting the land. The petitioner 



Steve Masse, a non-resident, asked for permission to speak 
on the article. Voice vote taken, motion carried. He ex- 
plained that he owns the land abutting the property. He 
wanted to buy the land and be able to build on the com- 
bined two parcels. The Finance Committee recommend- 
ed passage. A voice vote was taken, which left the Chair 
in doubt. The following tellers came forward to take a hand 
count: 



Jane Drury 
Judy Hass 
Jonathan Stubbs 
Edward Marshall 



Margaret Johnson 
Jean Horgan 
Walter Cleven 
Elizabeth Marshall 



Bill Drury 
Dave Fenn 
Carolyn Fenn 



Result of the hand count Yes: 276, No: 5, Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Selectman Dennis J. Ready mov- 
ed that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration being set by bid or auction of said pro- 
perty hereinafter described to convey and transfer all rights, 
title and interest, if any held by the Town, in a certain 
parcel of land on North Road, shown as Lot 55 on Assessors' 
Map 168. 

The Moderator asked the petitioner to come forward and 
explain the purpose of wanting the land. John Smith who 
abutts the property spoke on the article. He explained that 
the land is wet, he wants to purchase it and keep it open 
as a place for birds and other animals to go to. He knows 
that it is unbuildable. The Finance Committee recom- 
mended the article. A discussion took place concerning the 
exact location. It was explained that the land is land lock- 
ed and runs north of Mr. Smith's land. At the time of put- 
ting this on the warrant other people were interested in 
purchasing the land. That is why the wording mentions 
bid or auction. The land will be appraised, then the land 
will go to the highest bidder. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, which left the chair in doubt. A %'s vote is re- 
quired. A hand count was taken. Yes: 302, No: 3, Motion 
carried. 

At this time Selectman Ready moved to recess the An- 
nual Town meeting for the purpose of conducting the 
Special Town Meeting. The Annual Town meeting shall 
reconvene immediately after the Special Town Meeting. 
Motion carried, unanimously. The meeting recessed at 8:10 
PM. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 9, 1988 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 8:11 
PM. Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the reading 
of the Constable's return of service and posting of the war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman 
Ready moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked to allow Bernard Lynch, Thomas 
Carroll, William Mullen and Attorney Thomas Arnold, 
Special Town Counsel, to address the Town Meeting Body 
if necessary. He explained that Town Counsel James Harr- 



17 



ington had a conflict with some of the up coming articles. 
Attorney Arnold would address any questions during this 
Special Town Meeting. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Dennis Ready, moved 
that the Town vote to transfer (1) the sum of $13,576.00 
from the State Reimbursements for Hurricane Gloria and 
Flood Damage (2) the sum of $10,109.00 from Federal 
Reimbursements from Hurricane Gloria and (3) the sum 
of $11,193.00 from Article 11 of the Special Town Meeting 
of January 27, 1986 to the Highway Department, Line 81 
Salary. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this money totals 
$34,878.00 and will be used to pay for accrued sick time 
for three Highway Department employees who have retired 
within the last twelve months. This will be added to the 
Highway Departments salary line item. The Finance Com- 
mittee recommended the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to transfer (1) the sum of $32,259.00 
from Overlay Surplus and (2) the sum of $228,741.00 from 
Surplus Revenue to Insurance (Life and Medical), Line 
Item 139. Expense. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this is to complete the 
Town's payment for the Town Employees and retired Town 
Employees health insurance. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $3,249.00 from 
Article 11 of the Special Town Meeting of January 27, 1986 
to Article 9 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1985 to com- 
plete construction of the Dog Pound. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $2,031.00 from 
Article 11 of the Special Town Meeting of January 27, 1986 
to Data Processing, Line Item 146. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this money is for the ser- 
vice contract of the Assessors' computer system which was 
purchased last year under the capital planning article. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Gerald Hardy, Chairman of the 
Cemetery Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
transfer the sum of $18,000.00 from the sale of graves and 
lots to the Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey and transfer 
all rights, title and interest, if any held by the Town in a 



certain parcel of land on Shore Drive shown as Lot 76 on 
Assessors' Map 45. 

Selectman Ready explained that this was 3,662 square 
feet. The Moderator asked the petitioner to come forward 
and explain the purpose of wanting the land. Seeing that 
no one came forward, the Finance Committee recom- 
mended not to accept the article. Motion defeated by voice 
vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey and transfer 
all rights, title and interest, if any held by the Town in a 
certain parcel of land on Shore Drive shown as Lot 36, on 
Assessors' Map 45. 

The Moderator asked the petitioner to come forward and 
explain the purpose of wanting the land. Seeing that no 
one came forward, the Finance Committee recommended 
not to accept the article. Motion defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, 
for consideration to be determined, to convey and transfer 
all rights, title and interest, if any held by the Town in a 
certain parcel of land off Acton Road shown as Lot 36 on 
Assessor's Map 229. 

The Moderator asked the petitioner to come forward and 
explain the purpose of wanting the land. Seeing that no 
one came forward, the Finance Committee recommended 
not to accept the article. Motion defeated by voice vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Carl Olsson, Chairman of the 
School Committee, moved to dismiss this article. The 
Finance Committee recommended dismissal. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
to dismiss this article. The Finance Committee recommend- 
ed dismissal. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 James Doukszewicz, Chasirman 
of the Capital Planning Committee, moved that the Town 
vote to transfer the sum of $63,346.18 from the unexpend- 
ed proceeds of the amount authorized by Article 13 of the 
Annual Town Meeting of 1986, for the following purposes: 

$13,000.00 Sander for the Highway Department 
$32,500.00 Diesel Truck (Cap and Chassis) for the 

Highway Department 
$17,846.18 Addition funds for Office work to be 
$63 346 18 done at the Police Station pursuant to 

Article 17, Annual Town Meeting 

1987. 

James Doukszewicz explained that this is money left over 
from two years ago Capital Planning expenditures. Capital 
Planning monies must be used for the exact amount and 
item listed. For whatever reason the monies didn't get ex- 
pended and in order for them to be used they must be 
transferred and listed again. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 



18 



UNDER ARTICLE 12 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to transfer (1) the sum of $3,527.00 from 
Article 11 of the Special Town Meeting of January 27, 1986 
and (2) the sum of $21,473.00 from Line Item 140. Unem- 
ployment Benefits — State, to the Charter Commission Ex- 
pense Account, pursuant to G.L.C. 43B; Section 8. 

Selectman Ready moved to dismiss this article. Dwight 
Hayward of the Finance Committee, stated their support 
and explained that at some other point in time the Charter 
Commission will submit another article requesting funds. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 James McBride, Chairman of the 
Conservation Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
reaffirm the vote of Article 10 of the Special Town Meeting 
of May 11, 1987 and vote to petition the Great and General 
Court to enact special legislation to form a Special Con- 
servation, Recreation, District between the Town of 
Chelmford and the Town of Carlisle for the operation, ad- 
ministration, maintenance of property known as the Lowell 
Cranberry Bog, in the town of Chelmsford and Carlisle. 
Said bill, when approved by the Legislature and signed into 
law by the Governor, to be approved in its final form by 
the voters at an annual or Special Town Meeting in order 
for it to be implemented. 

Judith Hass, Member of the Conservation Commission, 
explained the article. Even though this was already voted 
on last year, the bill was not filed in time with the 
Legislature. Therefore this had to be revoted and resub- 
mitted. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Joseph Shanahan, representing 
the developers of the "Commons," gave a lengthy presen- 
tation on the article. There would be 108 units, ten of which 
would be put aside as affordable housing. If any future 
development should take place then the developers would 
require comprehensive permits. These 108 units fall within 
the requirements based on the present zoning by-laws. Kim 
MacKenzie read the Planning Board's recommendation: 
The Planning Board held a Public Hearing on May 4, 1988 
and voted in favor (7-0) of the proposal to amend the zon- 
ing by-laws and zoning map from (RB) Single Residence 
to Multiple Residence (RM). Peter Lawlor of the Finance 
Committee stated that the Finance Committee was in favor 
of the article. A lengthy dicussion took place. A number 
of voters spoke for and against the article. William Dalton 
moved the question to stop debate. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, which 
left the chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken: Yes 165, No 240, motion defeated. 
(See the wording on the warrant for description of the 
article.) 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to accept the conveyance by the 
Chelmsford Housing Authority to Town of Chelmsford of 
a parcel of land and buildings thereon, known as the North 
Town Hall and being described in a deed from Benjamin 
Adams and Thomas J. Adams, to the Inhabitants of the 
Town of Chelmford, recorded in Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds at Book 659, Page 495, with said property to be 



vested in the authority and control of the Board of Select- 
men and I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen for consideration to be determined, to con- 
vey all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town 
in a parcel of land and buildings thereon, known as the 
North Town Hall, and being described in a deed dated 
February 1, 1853, from Benjamin Adams and Thomas J. 
Adams, to the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford, 
recorded in Middlesex North Registry of Deeds at Book 
18, Page 33 and Middlesex South Registry of Deeds at Book 
659, Page 495. 

Selectman Ready explained that three years ago the 
Selectman sold this property along with two other proper- 
ties to the Housing Authority. This particular property 
because of Historical constraints on the property the Hous- 
ing Authority cannot develop the property and wish to turn 
it back to the Town. In the future the Selectmen will meet 
with the neighborhood and decide what to do with the pro- 
perty, most likely it will follow the steps of the grange hall 
in S. Chelmsford. Whereas a single family residence will 
be developed and thus preserving the Historical value of 
the property. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

The Moderator moved to adjourn the Special Town 
Meeting, seeing that there is no further business at hand 
and return to the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting. The 
Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen were in favor 
of the motion. Motion carried, unanimously. The meeting 
adjourned at 10:00 PM. 

The Moderator reconvened the Adjourned Annual Town 
Meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Selectman Ready moved to table 
this article (budget) because of the hour and continue on 
with the rest of the articles at hand. 

The Moderator asked for a voice vote which left the chair 
in doubt. He then asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Dwight Hayward, Chairman of 
the Finance Committee, moved to table this article, due 
to the same reason given for article 16. The outcome must 
be known from article 16 before acting on this article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to accept the following mentioned street, 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their 
reports duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk. 

1. Higate Road 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met and I move that the town vote 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and 
all temporary and/or permanent easements, and any pro- 
perty in fee simple, with trees thereon, by purchase, emi- 



19 



nent domain, or otherwise, for the purpose of securing traf- 
fic safety and road improvements, and I move the Town 
vote to raise and appropriate, the sum of ONE DOLLAR 
($1.00) to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in 
connection with the acquisition of said land and for pay- 
ing any damages which may be awarded as a result of any 
such taking; and I move the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary 
and proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

Selectman Ready explained that this is the normal pro- 
cedure for accepting Town streets after the Town Engineer 
has approved the plans. The Finance Committee is in favor. 
Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to accept the following mentioned street, 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and shown by their 
reports duly filed in the office of the Town Clerk: 

1. Autumn Lane 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met and I move that the town vote 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any and 
all temporary and/or permanent easements, and any pro- 
perty in fee simple, with trees thereon, by purchase, emi- 
nent domain, or otherwise, for the property located therein 
described herewith, for the purpose of securing traffic safety 
and road improvements, and I move the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate, the sum of ONE DOLLAR ($1.00) to 
defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in connection 
with the acquisition of said land and for paying any 
damages which may be awarded as a result of any such 
taking; and I move the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to negotiate and execute all necessary and 
proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen rcom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

Max Jordan moved to reconsider article 22. Due to ar- 
riving late to the meeting, he was unable to speak on the 
article when it was taken up. The Board of Selectmen and 
the Finance Committee were in favor for reconsideration. 
Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22 Mr. Jordan explained that the 
land abuts his property and he wanted to extend his 
children's playing area. The Board of Selectmen and 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. Reads as follows: 

Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen for consideration to be 
determined, to convey and transfer all rights, title and in- 
terest, if any held by the Town, in a certain parcel of land 
on Kevin and Brian Road shown as Lots 46, 47, 56 and 
57, on Assessors' Map 168. 



UNDER ARTICLE 27 Carl Olsson, Chairman of the 
School Committee, moved that the Town vote to authorize 
the School Committee to transfer, release or otherwise con- 
vey the care, custody, management and control, and all 
other right, title and interest, if any, in the parcels of lands 
as shown on a plan of land entitled "Plan of Sewer 
Easements/Chelmsford Schools" prepared by Howe 
Engineering, dated March, 1988, said plan being on file 
with the Town Engineer and incorporated herewith, to the 
Board of Selectmen, for the use by the Town of Chelmsford, 
for the purpose of constructing and maintaining gravity 
sewers, force mains and all other appurtenances thereto. 

John Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer Commission ex- 
plained that the Town owned land is on Richardson Road, 
under the School Department's jurisdiction. The Board of 
Selectmen must take over the land. Then the Selectmen 
will turn it over to the Sewer Commission. Once the Sewer 
Commission is allowed to build on this land they will be 
able to complete the sewage layout for all of Richardson 
Road. This will also include tying for the Parker School 
sewage, which will protect the drinking water wells. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen recom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
convey all right, title and interest, if any, in the parcels 
of land as shown on a plan of land entitled "Plan of Sewer 
Easements/Chelmsford Schools" prepared by Howe 
Engineering, dated March, 1988, said plan being on file 
with the Town Engineer and incorporated herewith, to the 
Chelmsford Sewer Commission and/or Chelmsford Center 
Industrial Sewer District, as the case may be, for purposes 
of constructing sewers, force mains, and maintaining gravi- 
ty sewers, force mains and all other appurtenances thereto. 

John Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer Commission, ex- 
plained that this involved the same properties as mention- 
ed in article 27. This would allow the Board of Selectmen 
to convey the land to the Sewer Commission. The Sewer 
Commission will then build on the properties. The Finance 
Committee and Board of Selectmen were in favor of this 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men, for consideration to be determined, to convey and 
transfer all rights, title and interest, if any held by the 
Town, in a certain parcel of land on Kevin Road, shown 
as Lot 45 Assessors' Map 168 being the premises described 
by an instrument, recorded in Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 4046, page 331. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town of Chelmsford vote to accept provisions of 
Section 12 of Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985 the School 
Improvement Act, in relation to the Equal Educational Op- 
portunity Grant in the amount of Seventeen Thousand 
Nine Hundred Twenty Dollars ($17,920.00), for the 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School, conditioned upon 
the funding of said programs by any source other than the 



20 



Town of Chelmsford, and further conditioned upon, to the 
extent permitted by law, that said professional grant pro- 
grams, and any monies paid to any employee of the 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School, shall not be used 
or considered a past practice for the purpose of collective 
bargaining and shall be nonrecurring lump sum payment 
not built into school employees salary schedules. 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
recommend the article. The Board of Selectmen recom- 
mended the article. Motion carried, unanimously.. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
to dismiss this article. This was in regards to accepting the 
Cranberry Bog Legislation, which now has to be resubmit- 
ted. The Finance Committee support the withdrawal. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously.. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or the Sewer Commissioners to acquire any and all 
temporary and/or permanent easements, and any proper- 
ty in fee simple with the buildings and trees thereon by 
purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise, for the property 
located in the Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and fur- 
ther described and shown on a set of plans, entitled "Plan 
of Sewer Easement in Chelmsford, Massachusestts, Center 
Interceptor Sewer," prepared for the Chelmsford Sewer 
Commission, March, 1988, scale 1 inch = 40 feet, by Howe 
Surveying, copies of which are on file in the office of the 
Town Engineer and are incorporated herewith, for the pur- 
pose of constructing and maintaining gravity sewers, force 
mains, pumping stations, and all other appurtenances 
thereto, to be expanded from the sale of Bonds/with said 
funds and/or notes authorized from Article 31 of the An- 
nual Town Meeting of 1984 necessary to defray all neces- 
sary costs, fees and expenses in connection with the acquisi- 
tion of said land and for paying any damages which may 
be awarded as the result of any such taking. 

John Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer Commmission, 
explained that this involves land takings in order to com- 
plete the sewage construction in the Center area. The 
Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen recommend- 
ed the article. Motion carried, unanimously.. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32 James McBride, Chairman of the 
Conservation Commission, moved to amend the article. Mr. 
McBride explained why he wanted trapping prohibited. 
A lengthy discussion followed. The Finance Committee did 
not support the article or the amendment. Renee 
LaRouche spoke against the article. He is a direct abutter 
to the Deep Brook Pond, in N. Chelmsford, where there 
is a beaver population in the area causing problems. Dams 
are being built causing flooding, stopping the flow of water, 
etc. More discussion followed. Other residents within the 
area spoke against the article. Joseph Campobasso, moved 
the question to stop debate. Motion carried, unanimous- 
ly. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on Mr. McBride's 
motion to amend the article. Motion defeated. He then 
asked for a voice vote on the main motion, motion defeated. 
(See warrant for text of article.) 



UNDER ARTICLE 33 Selectman Dennis Ready moved 
that the Town vote pursuant to General Law Chapter 82, 
Section 21, that public conveyance and necessity require 
that a portion of Swain Road as hereinafter described shall 
be discontinued and all public rights in any and all por- 
tions of said Streets, and/or Town ways relative to said street 
shall be henceforth discontinued and abandoned; said 
street is more particularly described as follows: 

That portion of Swain Road as shown on a Plan of 
relocation of Swain Road on file with the Town Clerk. 

And moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen, for consideration to be determined, to con- 
vey and transfer, all right, title and interest, if any, held 
by the town in the above parcel of the land located on the 
discontinued portion of said way/road, to the abutters of 
said property. 

Joseph Shanahan, representing the DiRubbo family ex- 
plained the article. They owned a large tract of land and 
in 1959 the Town took by eminent domain 7,000 square 
feet of their land to relocate Swain Road. A portion taken 
has not been used in the past forty years, and if the Town 
abandons the land the DiRubbo's will be able to purchase 
it and use with the remaining piece of 10,000 square feet. 
They will likely go to the Board of Appeals and try to form 
a building lot, to build a single family house. Before the 
taking, the lot was in fact a legal size lot, but due to the 
zoning by-law changing two years ago the lot would be con- 
sidered a non-buildable lot. The Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen supported the article. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen supported the ar- 
ticle. A question was asked if this would be used as an ac- 
cess road for future condominium development. The 
answer was no. Within the bid process, used by the board 
of Selectmen, could in fact restrict the use of the property. 
Jeffrey Stallard moved the question to stop debate. Motion 
carried, unanimously.. A %'s vote is needed. A voice vote 
taken on the main motion, left the chair in doubt, the 
tellers came forward and a hand count was taken. Yes 168, 
No 9, Motion carried. 

Selectmen Ready moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Monday evening May 16th, at 7:30 PM at the McCarthy 
Middle School Gymnasium. Motion carried, unanimous- 
ly. The meeting adjourned at 11:05 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 16, 1988 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium at 7:40 
PM, by the Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized 
the presence of a quorum. There were 423 voters present. 



21 



The Moderator reviewed the Town Meeting procedure 
with the voters. He also reminded them where the fire ex- 
its were and announced that the Charter Commission 
would be having a public hearing on Tuesday evening May 
17th at 7:00 PM at the Town Office Building, and he urg- 
ed the voters to attend. 

The Moderator then asked to allow Bernard Lynch, 
Thomas Carroll, and William Mullen, non-residents to 
speak from time to time concerning items of interest. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 William Dalton made a point of 
order. He asked to make a motion. This is in regards to 
the individual budgets. After each department head and 
the Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee make their 
recommendations there should be a limit of twenty minutes 
for debate. The Finance Committee was against the mo- 
tion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion de- 
feated. The vote was questioned. The Moderator asked for 
a show of hands, which left the Chair in doubt a %'s vote 
is required. The following tellers came forward and con- 
ducted a hand count: 



Jocelyn Anthony 
Elizabeth Marshall 
Michael Anthony 
William Drury 



Margaret Johnson 
Edward Marshall 
Jonathan Stubbs 
Carolyn Fenn 



Paul Ahern 
Judy Hass 
Jane Drury 



result of the hand count Yes 152, No 139 (%'s 194) motion 
defeated. 

Barry Bell moved to limit debate to three minutes per 
speaker, per line item. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote. Motion defeated. 

Dwight Hayward, Chairman of the Finance Committee 
moved to make the following adjustments to certain line 
items: 



Department/ Line Item 
Town Clerk- 50 
Town Clock- 52 
Treasurer/Collector — 56 
Dog Officer- 59 
Cemetery — 114 
Veterans Benefits— 128 



and to transfer from overlay surplus reserve $450,000.00 
minus this amount from line #144 Expense $1,327,360.00 
under the Insurance (Life & Medical Budget) for a total 
figure of $850,656.00. 

and reduce line #89 Salary under the Highway Depart- 
ment an additional $200.00 from the stabilization fund 
interest total figure $7,200.00 for a total budget of 
$1,374,138.00 

and increase line #41 Salary under the Registrars by 
$1,500.00, but reduce #42 Expenses by $1,500.00 (does 
not effect total budget figure) 



Description 


Amount 


Out of State 


$1.00 


Expenses 


$1.00 


Outlay 


$1.00 


Pound Rental 


$1.00 


Out of State 


$1.00 


Outlay 


$1.00 



and minus $20,000.00 from line item 76 Salaries under 
the Police budget (which will leave a total budget figure 
of $2,532,991.00) and increase $20,000.00 line #72 
Salaries which will reflect a total figure of $179,126.00 
under the Inspection Department. For a total budget 
figure of $196,878.00. 

and reduce line #143, Expense under County Retirement 
Assessment by $39,268.00 for a total budget figure of 
$1,288,092.00. and increase line item #146 Expense by 
$39,268.00 under Unemployment Benefits (State) for 
a total budget figure of $239,268.00. 



The Moderator asked for discussion on the motion. 
Questions were asked about the $1.00 increases. Dwight 
Hayward explained that by leaving a $1.00 figure in these 
line items if transfer needed to be made through the year 
it could be done. Without the amount the department head 
would have to wait until the next annual town meeting to 
appropriate an amount. A question was asked concerning 
the $450,000.00. This money was a revenue source which 
had already been raised in previous years in anticipation 
of abatements for the Assessors'. This money could only be 
used to REDUCE a budget not be ADDED for expen- 
ditures. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the mo- 
tion to amend. Motion carried. 

Selectman Bradford Emerson moved that the entire Per- 
sonnel Department budget figure of $10,958.00 be transfer- 
red to the Selectmen's Salary line item #44. Due to the fact 
that the Human Resource Director position did not pass, 
as of July 1st the Treasurer was going to transfer the work 
load of health insurance, and other insurance benefits to 
the Selectmen. This money would be used to hire an addi- 
tional clerk. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, mo- 
tion carried. 

The Moderator read the Accounting Department's 
budget and asked for discussion, hearing none he went on 
to the Assessors Depatment. Under the Assessors Depart- 
ment James Sousa moved to amend the Salary figure to 
read $164,392.00, and a total budget figure of $260,162.00. 
He felt the department head knew what he/she needed to 
maintain the present services. And didn't think it fair that 
the Finance Committee went ahead and made their recom- 
mendations in some cases without any input from the 
department head. The department head should come forth 
and explain why they requested the monies shown and let 
the voters decide if a cut should be made. He planned to 
amend each individual budget throughout the meeting to 
reflect what the department originally requested. The 
Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee did not 
recommend the motion to amend. Diane Phillips, Assessor, 
stated that the Assessors had decided to work with the 
figures recommended by the Finance Committee. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend. 
Motion defeated. He asked for further discussion, hearing 
none he read from Board of Appeals through Planning 
Board, asking for any need for discussion after reading the 
line items and the total budget figure. 



22 



Under Public Buildings, James Sousa moved to amend 
the line item #37 Salary to read $89,401.00 for a total figure 
of $161,251.00. Rogert Deletetsky, Building Superintendent 
was in favor of the motion. He explained that under the 
Finance Committee's recommendation he would be losing 
a part-time personnel. He explained what his department's 
duties and responsibilities were. The Finance Committee 
was against the motion to amend. A discussion took place. 
The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to 
amend. Motion defeated. He asked for further discussion, 
hearing none he read from the Registrars Department 
through Treasurer/Collector, asking for any need for discus- 
sion after reading the line items and the total budget figure. 

Under Dog Office Department, James Sousa moved to 
amend the line item #57 Salary to read $30,025.00 for a 
total figure of $39,825.00. The Finance Committee and 
the Board of Selectmen were against the motion. The 
Selectmen explained that the cuts that were being made 
were difficult choices. Due to the Annual Town Election 
vote not to override Prop. 2 V6 , the cuts had to be made, 
regardless of the circumstances. Discussion took place. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend. 
Motion defeated. He asked for further discussion, hearing 
none he read the Emergency Management Agency Budget 
asking for any need for discussion after reading the line 
items and the total budget figure. 

Under the Fire Department Robert Hughes, Fire Chief, 
moved to amend the budget's total figure to read 
$2,635,777.00, by adding $180,000.00 to line item #63 
Salary. This is the amount needed in order to keep six men 
who are slated to be cut as of July 1st. Chief Hughes ex- 
plained that the need is there and these men shouldn't be 
cut. It would not be for the best interest of the Town. Public 
safety should be a priority and not cut back. Henry Sullivan 
spoke in favor of the motion to amend. He stated that as 
a retired state trooper he saw many examples of firemens 
duties other than fires. They are always at accidents with 
the jaws of life trying to rescue people from vehicles, before 
or during a fire. Any type of emergency calls pertaining 
to health a fireman could be present with oxygen, or per- 
forming CPR before an ambulance arrives. Anytime a 
human life is involved a price shouldn't be put on the value. 
William Dalton of the local Fireman Union spoke in favor. 
He explained that the department is already below the re- 
quired recommended amount of personnel to have on hand 
to maintain equipment/shifts. The budget is already down 
to the minimum before any of these cuts are performed. 
He asked for support of the amendment. The Finance 
Committee spoke against the motion to amend. If this mo- 
tion passes the Town would be faced with an unbalanced 
budget. Selectman Henrick Johnson spoke against the mo- 
tion, unfortunately the Selectmen had no choice but to 
recommend the cut. A lengthy discussion took place. 
Michael Anthony moved to amend the amendment. After 
viewing the motion the Moderator declared the motion out 
of order. More discussion took place. Barry Balan moved 
the question. Voice vote taken, motion carried unanimous- 
ly. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the motion 
to amend the Fire Department budget by increasing it 
$180,000.00. This vote left the chair in doubt, the 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. He 
asked for further discussion, hearing none he read the 



amended budget figures. He read from the Hydrant Ser- 
vice through the Tree Warden Department and asking for 
any need for discussion after reading the line items and 
the total budget figure. 

Under the Highway Department, James Sousa moved to 
amend line item #89 Salary to read $652,745.00 for a total 
budget figure of $1,409,538.00. The Board of Selectmen 
and the Finance Committee were against this motion. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion defeated. 

Gerrit Vander-Heide, moved to adjourn the meeting at 
this time. Both the Finance Committee and the Selectmen 
were against the motion. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote, motion defeated. 

The Moderator continued to the budgets from Street 
Lighting down to Lowell Mental Health. He asked for any 
need for discussion after reading the line items and the total 
budget figure. 

Under the Health Department, James Sousa moved to 
amend line item #100 Salary to read $125,116.00 for a total 
budget of $167,343.00. The Finance Committee did not 
recommend the motion. The Selectmen were also against 
the motion. The Moderator asked for a voice vote on the 
motion to amend. Motion defeated. He asked for further 
discussion, hearing none he read the Sewer Commission's 
budget asking for any need for discussion after reading the 
line items and the total budget figure. 

Under the Waste Collection Budget a discussion took 
place. Lawrence Segal moved to amend the budget line #110 
to read $0.00. The Finance Committee was against this 
motion. The Board of Selectmen were against the motion. 
Selectman Ready explained that the Town was under a con- 
tract with a collection company. As of July 1st, this was 
the third year of a three year contract and the Town would 
have to pay the amount shown. The Moderator asked for 
a voice vote on the motion, motion defeated. More discus- 
sion took place. John Wilder moved to reduce the line item 
#110 figure of $1,182,334.00 by $180,000.00 for a total figure 
of $1,002,334.00. Which would be the monies needed for 
the Fire Deprtment's budget thus there would be a balanced 
budget. He explained that perhaps the company would 
allow the Town to cut back on their collection time. In- 
stead of once a week collection we could have collection 
every two weeks. The Selectmen were against this. The Blue 
Ribbon Committee was looking into possible ways of recycl- 
ing materials, etc. in order to decrease the cost of waste 
collection for the next contract. But at this time this is the 
amount needed and the conditions of the contract could 
not be changed. Edward Marshall moved the question to 
stop debate. Motion carried, unanimously. The Moderator 
asked for a voice vote on the motion to amend, motion 
defeated. He asked if there was any need for further discus- 
sion, hearing none we went on to the next budget. 

Under the Education budget, the Moderator read the 
School Departments total town funds line item of 
$20,491,884.00 minus the total receipts of $3,388,413.00 
for a Net Cost of $17,103,471.00 he asked for any discus- 
sion hearing none he then read the Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School Budget of $677,490.00. he asked 



23 



for any need for discussion. Arthur Glatt asked to return 
to the Education Budget. Arthur Glatt moved to change 
the Net Cost from $17,103,471.00 to $18,091,871.00. The 
Finance Committee Chairman Dwight Hayward, explain- 
ed that the number of $20,491,884.00 is the figure that 
the Finance Committee recommends. The School Commit- 
tee requested $21,480,284.00. The Finance Committee does 
not recommend the high figure. If voted this would make 
the budget out of balance. Selectman Ready explained that 
the Board of Selectmen would not vote at this time, to have 
another election to vote an override. 

A discussion took place. A number of voters spoke in 
favor of increasing the budget. Voters felt if the Fire Depart- 
ment's budget was increased then the School Department's 
should be increased also. A cut would hurt property in- 
vestments plus the future of the children in town. Carl 
Olsson, Chairman of the School Committee, explained that 
up to this meeting, the School Committee had $76,117.00 
left to cut from their budget in order to meet the Finance 
Committee's figure. He presented a list of areas along with 
the amounts to be cut. There would be twenty- three per- 
sonnel layed off. One administrator, class room size would 
be increased. Beginning this fall the freshman class of 1992 
would be cut back on their required courses needed to 
graduate. Other areas were shown that would be effected. 
James DeProfio spoke in favor of increasing the budget. 
The need is there to go beyond the basic requirements, 
which will be the results after the cuts are made. The work- 
ing world is far more competitive now. The average stu- 
dent needs to have the extra activities that are sited to be 
cut. Arthur Glatt stated that once the budget is cut the 
Town will never be able to return to the same quality educa- 
tion. He felt that the voters would in fact vote for an over- 
ride. They have seen the cuts and would be willing to pro- 
vide the extra money needed for funding. Selectman Ready 
explained that as of yet the people in town have not seen 
or felt the cuts. That is why the Board feels that next year 
if needed the Selectmen will support an override and ask 
for one. People do not believe that the town does not have 
any money. If this budget passes with the increase figure 
then nothing "has changed" as far as those who voted for 
the override are concerned. The "hidden money" would 
be found. The Town Meeting Body should go by the wishes 
of those who voted in the election — over 6,000 voters voted 
in favor and the majority vote should be recognized, not 
the action of a town meeting vote. 

Barry Balan moved to amend the figure to add 
$76,000.00 to the Finance Committee requested figure for 
a total of $20,567,884.00. A discussion took place. Samuel 
Poulton, a member of the School Committee but speak- 
ing as a voter in the town, expressed concern over the cuts 
that were being proposed by the Committee. He felt that 
the voters at town meeting had as much right to vote what 
they felt was right, regardless of how the voters voted at 
the Annual Town Election. He felt that $900,000.00 is not 
needed, however, the $800,000.00 being cut is in addition 
to cuts already made. An adequate amount should be the 
amount requested. But due to the fact that the School 
Committee agreed with the Board of Selectmen and the 
Finance Committee to cut $800,000.00 if the override ques- 
tion failed then they are obligated to work with the budget 
cut. Selectman Johnson explained that because of state law, 



the Town must have a balanced budget in order to set a 
tax rate so revenues can come in. Joseph Campobasso 
moved the question to stop debate. Motion carried, 
unanimously. A voice vote was taken on the motion to 
amend the amendment the figure by increasing the Finance 
Committee's figure $76,000.00. Motion defeated. Harry 
Foster questioned the vote. The Moderator asked for 
another voice vote, motion defeated. Discussion followed 
concerning the motion to amend the figure to read 
$21,480,284.00. Malcolm Roberts moved to amend this 
figure to read $21,000,000.00. He felt that this figure would 
be one that the School Committee would be able to work 
with. He believed in quality education, and did not want 
to see any cuts in the budget. Discussion took place. The 
Finance Committee was against the motion, if voted it 
would increase the budget $580,000.00 which the Town 
does not have. The Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee were against the motion to amend. Edward 
Marshall moved the question which would stop debate. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to amend the budget figure to read 
$21,000,000. Motion defeated. The Chair was questioned 
on the voice vote. The tellers came forward and conducted 
a hand count. Yes 179, No 109, motion carried. 

Selectman Ready moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Monday, May 23rd at 7:30 PM at the McCarthy Middle 
School. The Finance Committee was against the motion. 
After a discussion Selectman Ready withdrew the motion. 

Selecman Ready then moved to reconsider the School 
Department's budget of $21,000,000.00. The Finance Com- 
mittee was in favor of reconsideration. A discussion took 
place Arthur Glatt moved the question to stop debate. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a voice 
vote on the motion to reconsider the School Department's 
budget. Motion defeated. 

Barry Bell moved to accept line items 111-149 inclusively 
in total as a single package as amended by the Finance 
Committee. The Finance Committee was against the mo- 
tion. They felt that the departments should be heard in- 
dividually. Both the Moderator and Town Counsel ruled 
the motion out of order. Barry Bell withdrew his motion. 

William Dalton moved to take Unemployment Benefits 
(State) and line item 146 out of order. The Finance Com- 
mittee was in favor, the Board of Selectmen did not recom- 
mend one way or the other. The Moderator asked for a 
voice vote, motion carried. William Dalton explained that 
without six firemen being laid off that the employment 
benefits could be reduced at this time by $180,000.00. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were 
against the motion. The Finance Committee explained that 
the money shown may still be needed by the time the 
budget is fully balanced and did not want to reduce it in 
any way. The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion 
defeated. The Chair was questioned on the vote. A show 
of hands was asked, the Chair was still left in doubt, the 
tellers came forward and conducted a hand count: Yes 106, 
No 146, motion defeated. 

The Moderator read the Cemetery Department's line 
items and total budget fiture. He asked for any discussion 



24 



hearing none he went on to the Council on Aging. James 
Sousa moved to amend line item #116 Salary to read 
$92,833.00 for a total budget of $116,491.00. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen were against the 
motion. A voice vote was taken, motion defeated. The 
Moderator asked if there was any need for further discus- 
sion on this budget? Hearing none he went on and read 
from the Cultural Council through the Debt Service, ask- 
ing if there was any need for discussion after reading the 
line items and the total budget figure for each department. 

The Moderator read the motion under Article 16 reflec- 
ting the figure needed. Town Treasurer James Doukszewicz, 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 



of $38,877,462.00 to defray Town charges for the fiscal 
period from July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989. 

The Finance Committee does not recommend the figure. 
The town will have an unbalanced budget if this figure 
is voted. This will not be in the best interest of the Town. 
The Treasurer will not be able to borrow monies. A Special 
Town Meeting will have to be called and the budget will 
have to be brought back up to be level funded. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote. Motion defeated. The 
Chair was questioned on the vote, the tellers came forward 
and conducted a hand count Yes 178, No 71, Motion car- 
ried. The Budget reads as follows: 



FY88 
Appropriated 

(Includes 

Special Town 

Meetings and 

Reserve Fund 

Transfers) 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 5% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



FY89 

Department 

Requests 

(Assumes 

Full 
Funding) 



FY89 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

1. Salary $ 

2. Expense 

3. Outlay 

Total Accounting Department $ 

ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT 

4. Salary $ 

5. Expense 

6. Outlay 

7. Legal Services 

8. Revaluation Update 

Total Assessors Department $ 

BOARD OF APPEALS 

9. Expense $ 

1987 
CABLE TV COMMISSION 

10. Expense $ 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

11. Salary $ 

12. Expense 

Total Conservation Commission $ 

1987 
CONSTABLE 

13. Salary $ 

DATA PROCESSING 

14. Expense $ 

ELECTIONS 

15. Wages & Expenses $ 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

16. Expense $ 



105,626 

9,459 

1 



115,086 



250,189 



112,430 

3,000 

1 



112,430 

3,000 

1 



115,431 



115,431 



141,512 5 


\ 164,392 


$ 160,861 


59,065 


56,970 


56,970 


1,100 


800 


800 


1,012 


5,000 


5,000 


47,500 


33,000 


33,000 



260,162 



6,161 


$ 


6,317 


Annual Receipts: 


$6,475 


3,500 


$ 


3,650 


6,242 
7,400 


$ 


6,398 
7,615 


13,642 


$ 


14,013 


Annual Receipts: 


$2,450 


500 


$ 


500 


7,404 


$ 


18,670 


18,788 


$ 


24,459 


3,000 


$ 


3,150 



256,631 



6,317 



3,650 



6,398 
7,615 



14,013 



500 



$ 


18,670 


$ 


24,459 


$ 


3,150 



25 



FY88 

Appropriated FY89 

(Includes Department 

Special Town Requests 

Meetings and (Assumes 

Reserve Fund Full 

Transfers) Funding) 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

17. Expense $ 1,051 $ 1,561 

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

18. Expense $ 1,000 $ 1,500 

INSURANCE (LIABILITY) 

19. Expense $ 680,421 $ 722,009 

LAW 

20. Salary $ 500 $ 500 

21. Legal Services 55,000 55,000 

22. Special Counsel 15,000 15,000 

23. Expense 750 750 

Total Law Department $ 71,250 $ 71,250 

MEDICAL BILLS RETIRED POLICE & FIRE 

24. Expense $ 10,000 $ 7,500 

MOBILE HOME RENT CONTROL BOARD 

25. Expense $ 500 $ 525 

MODERATOR 

26. Salary $ 300 $ 300 

27. Expense 75 75_ 

Total Moderator $ 375 $ 375 

NMAC 

28. Expense $ 9,000 $ 9,068 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

29. Expense $ 650 $ 650 

PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT 

30. Salary (Net of $23,400 Grant) $ 9,104 $ 18,707 

31. Expense 5,300 2,250 

32. Outlay 1_ 

Total Personnel Department $ 14,404 $ 20,958 

PLANNING BOARD 

33. Salary $ 18,502 $ 20,113 

34. Expense 4,160 4,326 

35. Outlay 1 1_ 

Total Planning Board $ 22,663 $ 24,440 

1987 Annual Receipts: $10,150 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

36. Supt. of Buildings $ 20,412 $ 

37. Salary 62,358 89,401 

38. Expense 64,304 67,850 

39. Supervision Fee 2,000 

40. Outlay 3,000 4,000 

Total Public Buildings $ 152,074 $ 161,251 

*Line items 36 & 37 are now combined 1987 Annual Receipts: $30,242 

REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

41. Salary $ 24,418 $ 26,257 

42. Expense (Net of $3400 Grant) 9,240 11,820 

43. Outlay 1 1_ 

Total Registrars Department $ 33,659 $ 38,078 



FY89 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 

$ 1,560 



1,500 



722,009 



500 
55,000 
15,000 

750 



$ 71,250 

$ 2,500 

$ 1 



300 
75 



375 

9,068 

650 



10,207 
750 

1 



10,958 



$ 20,113 

4,326 

1 



24,440 




80,401 
66,850 


4,000 



151,251 



26,257 

10,320 

1 



36,578 



26 



FY88 

Appropriated FY89 

(Includes Department 

Special Town Requests 

Meetings and (Assumes 

Reserve Fund Full 

Transfers) Funding) 

SELECTMEN DEPARTMENT 

44. Salary $ 94,739 $ 100,531 

45. Expense 23,550 18,200 

46. Outlay 1 1 

47. Out of State 1,200 1,500 

Total Selectmen Department $ 119,490 $ 120,232 

1987 Annual Receipts: $41,336 
TOWN CLERK 

48. Salary $ 108,609 % 110,357 

49. Expense 7,375 6,700 

50. Out of State 800 1,150 

51. Outlay 425 1_ 

Total Town Clerk Department $ 117,209 $ 118,208 

1987 Annual Receipts: $28,089 

TOWN CLOCK 

52. Expense $ 600 $ 

TOWN & FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS 

53. Expense $ 6,000 $ 6,500 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

54. Salary $ 167,123 $ 179,021 

55. Expense 29,300 34,625 

56. Outlay 500 3,400 

Total Treasurer/Collector $ 196,923 $ 217,046 

1987 Annual Receipts: $249,583 
PUBLIC SAFETY: 13.7% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



FY89 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 

I 108,489 

18,200 

1 

1,500 



128,190 



109,507 

6,700 

1 

1 



116,209 



1.00 



6,500 



179,021 

34,624 

1 



213,646 



DOG OFFICER DEPARTMENT 

57. Salary % 28,243 $ 30,025 

58. Expense 3,000 8,000 

59. Pound Rental 6,000 

60. Care of Live Animals 1,800 1,800 

Total Dog Officer Department $ 39,043 $ 39,825 

1987 Annual Receipts: $16,691 
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 

61. Expense $ 2,190 $ 4,190 

62. Outlay U01 1,101 

Total Emergency Management Agency $ 3,291 $ 5,291 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

63. Salary $ 2,410,500 $ 2,459,282 

64. Expense 129,409 157,010 

65. Out of State 1,000 1,000 

66. Outlay 13,360 18,485 

Total Fire Department $ 2,554,269 $ 2,635,777 

1987 Annual Receipts: $2,457 
HYDRANT SERVICE 

67. Center $ 54,700 $ 54,900 

68. North 19,300 19,300 

69. East 7,000 7,000 

Total Hydrant Service $ 81,000 $ 81,200 



22,025 

8,000 

1 

1,800 



31,826 



2,190 
1,101 



3,291 



2,459,282 

157,010 

1,000 

18,485 



$ 2,635,777 



27 



FY88 

Appropriated FY89 

(Includes Department 

Special Town Requests 

Meetings and (Assumes 

Reserve Fund Full 

Transfers) Funding) 
INSECT/PEST CONTROL 

70. Salary $ 1,250 $ 1,250 

71. Expense 10,800 10,800 

Total Insect/Pest Control $ 12,050 $ 12,050 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

72. Salary $ 172,702 $ 179,126 

73. Expense 16,226 17,251 

74. Out of State 500 500 

75. Outlay 1 1_ 

Total Inspection Department $ 189,429 $ 196,878 

1987 Annual Receipts: $230,176 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

76. Salary $ 2,261,635 $ 2,335,449 

77. Expense 224,812 212,309 

78. Out of State 1,050 1,500 

79. Outlay 1 1 

80. Expense -Auxiliary 3,070 2,631 

81. Outlay -Auxiliary 400 100 

82. Police Mutual Aid 2,000 0_ 

Total Police Department $ 2,492,968 $ 2,551,990 

1987 Annual Rceipts: $231,236 
SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

83. Salary $ 2,100 $ 2,100 

84. Expense 300 300_ 

Total Sealer of Weights & Measures $ 2,400 $ 2,400 

1987 Annual Receipts: $1,181 
TRAFFIC & SAFETY COMMITTEE 

85. Expense $ 90,000 $ 94,300 

TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT 

86. Salary $ 1,000 $ 1,000 

87. Expense 13,875 13,875 

88. Outlay 1 1_ 

Total Tree Warden Department $ 14,876 $ 14,876 



FY89 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 

f 1,250 

5,800 



7,050 



179,126 

17,251 

500 

1 



196,878 



2,315,449 

212,309 

1,500 

1 

2,631 

100 

1 



$ 2,531,991 



2,100 
300 



2,400 



49,300 



1,000 

13,875 

1 



14,876 



HIGHWAYS: 4.17% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

89. Salary $ 637,489 $ 662,745 

90. Expense 464,994 483,593 

91. Snow & Ice 270,000 270,000 

Total Highway Department $ 1,372,483 $ 1,416,338 

Appropriation from Revenue Sharing 7,000 

Net Cost Highway Department $ 1,372,483 $ 1,409,338 

1987 Annual Receipts: $1,130 
STEET LIGHTING 

92. Expense $ 168,000 $ 150,000 



652,745 
458,593 
270,000 



1,381,338 
7,200 



$ 1,374,138 



140,000 



28 



FY88 
Appropriated 

(Includes 
Special Town 
Meetings and 
Reserve Fund 

Transfers) 

TOWN ENGINEER 

93. Salary $ 78,287 

94. Expense 9,385 

95. Outlay 2,000 

96. Out of State 1 

Total Town Engineer $ 89,673 

HEALTH & SANITATION: 4.06% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



FY89 


FY89 


Department 


Finance 


Requests 


Committee 


(Assumes 


Recommendation 


Full 


(For Balanced 


Funding) 


Budget) 


84,492 


$ 84,492 


18,885 


10,885 


1,000 


1,000 


1 


1 



104,378 



96,378 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

97. Salary $ 1,000 $ 1,000 

98. Expense 400 400 

Total Animal Inspector's Department $ 1,400 $ 1,400 

LOWELL MENTAL HEALTH 

99. Expense $ 9,000 $ 12,000 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

100. Salary $ 118,525 $ 125,116 

101. Expense 32,225 32,225 

102. Outlay 1 1 

103. Out of State 1 1 

104. Mosquito Control 10,000 10,000 

Total Health Department $ 160,752 $ 167,343 

1987 Annual Receipts: $28,138 
SEWER COMMISSION 

105. Salary $ 60,731 $ 112,408 

106. Expense 20,500 48,000 

107. Professional Fees 55,000 65,000 

108. Outlay 1 1 

109. Out of State 5,000 6,000 

Total Sewer Commission $ 141,232 $ 231,409 

WASTE COLLECTION 

110. Expense $ 1,182,334 $ 1,182,334 

EDUCATION: 54.8% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



1,000 
400 



1,400 
12,000 



123,256 
32,225 

1 

1 

10,000 



165,483 



91,999 

45,000 

65,000 

1 

5,000 



207,000 



$ 1,182,334 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL BUDGET 

School Committee $ 33,860 $ 61,415 

Superintendent's Office 400,000 352,533 

Supervision 103,420 125,706 

Principals 896,163 931,844 

Teaching 11,204,980 12,024,058 

Textbooks 119,137 106,375 

Library 280,420 299,878 

Audio-Visual 149,858 155,001 

Guidance 622,508 646,912 

Educational TV 62,645 62,905 

School Attendance 36,750 39,635 

Health Services 153,493 170,525 

Transportation 869,216 961,174 

Food Services 29,000 30,329 

Athletics 217,585 240,000 

Other Student Activities 66,962 75,000 

Custodial 1,122,351 1,255,360 



29 



FY88 

Appropriated FY89 

(Includes Department 

Special Town Requests 

Meetings and (Assumes 

Reserve Fund Full 

Transfers) Funding) 

Utilities 813,450 813,450 

Maintenance of Grounds 40,000 40,000 

Maintenance of Buildings 102,206 102,206 

Maintenance of Equipment 224,024 243,430 

Programs with Other Schools 10,000 10,000 

Add Back 11,900 0_ 

Sub-Total 17,569,928 18,747,736 

Chapter 766 2,428,576 2,742,548 

Total 19,998,504 21,490,284 

Minus Tuitions 70,000 

Minus PL 874 20,000 10,000 

Total Town Funds $ 19,908,504 $ 21,480,284 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

111. Total Town Assessment $ 637,520 $ 677,490 

COMMUNITY SERVICE: 2.87% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

112. Salary $ 140,401 $ 155,564 

113. Expense 24,588 28,702 

114. Out of State 500 500 

115. Outlay 3,094 4,800 

Total Cemetery Department $ 168,583 $ 189,566 

1987 Annual Receipts: $14,938 
COUNCIL ON AGING 

116. Salary $ 84,556 $ 92,831 

117. Expense 22,750 23,660 

Total Council on Aging % 107,306 $ 116,491 

CULTURAL COUNCIL 

118. Expense $ 100 $ 100 

ELDER SERVICES OF MERRIMACK VALLEY 

119. Expense $ 1,800 $ 1,800 

COMMISSION ON HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS 

120. Expense $ 100 $ 1,900 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

121. Salary $ 450,675 $ 497,151 

122. Expense 79,262 89,220 

123. Books & Periodicals 112,550 132,250 

124. Outlay 1 4,000 

125. Out of State 1 1,000 

Total Library Department $ 642,489 $ 723,621 

1987 Annual Receipts: $16,853 
VETERANS BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 

126. Salary $ 51,088 $ 58,237 

127. Expense 4,300 4,470 

128. Outlay 100 

129. Cash & Material Grant 53,000 55,120 

Total Veterans Benefits Department $ 108,488 $ 117,827 

Grant Reimbursement @ 75% 



FY89 

Finance 

Committee 

Recommendation 

(For Balanced 

Budget) 



21,010,000 
10,000 



$ 21,000,000 



677,490 



155,564 

28,702 

1 

2,800 



187,067 



83,831 
20,660 



104,491 



100 



1,800 



1,900 



486,176 

89,220 

120,750 

1 

500 



696,647 



58,237 

4,470 

1 

55,120 



117,828 



30 



FY88 
Appropriated 

(Includes 
Special Town 
Meetings and 
Reserve Fund 

Transfers) 

PARKS & RECREATION: .31% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

130. Expense $ 700 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

131. Salary $ 40,919 

132. Expense 6. ,700 

133. Outlay 1_ 

Total Park Department $ 47,620 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

134. Salary $ 41,533 

135. Expense 25,842 

136. Outlay 1_ 

Total Recreation Commission $ 67,376 

VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

137. Salary $ 3,150 

138. Expense 1,999 

139. Outlay 1_ 

Total Varney Playground $ 5,150 

PUBLIC CELEBRATION: .01% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

HOLIDAY DECORATION COMMITTEE 

140. Expense $ 750 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

141. Expense $ 1,000 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTE 

142. Expense $ 2,900 

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS: 7.42% OF TOTAL BUDGET 

COUNTY RETIREMENT ASSESSMENT 

143. Expense $ 1,182,317 

INSURANCE (LIFE & MEDICAL) 

144. Expense $ 1,040,525 

Transfer from 

MEDICARE TAX (FICA) 

145. Expense $ 27,500 

UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (STATE) 

146. Expense $ 40,000 

VETERANS PENSION CLAIMS 

147. Expense $ 6,375 



FY89 


FY89 


Department 


Finance 


Requests 


Committee 


(Assumes 


Recommendation 


Full 


(For Balanced 


Funding) 


Budget) 



1,000 



41,902 

6,700 

1 



48,603 



44,843 

26,833 

1 



71,677 



11,707 



750 



$ 1,500 

$ 10,545 



700 



41,902 

6,700 

1 



48,603 



44,843 
16,833 

1 



61.677 



3,308 


$ 3,308 


2,099 


2,099 


6,300 


3,300 



8,707 

750 
1,000 
1,500 



$ 


1,327,360 


$ 


1,288,092 




$1,300,656 




$1,300,656 


overlay 


surplus reserve 




-450.000 






$ 


850,656 


$ 


32,500 


$ 


32,500 


$ 


30,000 


$ 


239,268 


$ 


6,630 


$ 


6,630 



31 



FY88 






Appropriated 


FY89 


FY89 


(Includes 


Department 


Finance 


Special Town 


Requests 


Committee 


Meetings and 


(Assumes 


Recommendation 


Reserve Fund 


Full 


(For Balanced 


Transfers) 


Funding) 


Budget) 



DEBT SERVICE: 7.68% OF TOTAL BUDGET 



DEBT & INTEREST 

PRINCIPAL PAYMENTS: 

Westland and Harrington Schools . . . 

Byam School 

School Bldg. Capital Improv #5 .... 
School Bldg. Capital Improv #6 .... 

School Computer Purchase 

Sewer Plans & Design 

Capital Improv Art. 13-1986 

Sewer Construction Phase 1*** 

Conservation Land Purchase 

148. Total Principal Payments 

INTEREST PAYMENTS: 

Anticipation and other Temporary 

Loans 

Bond Anticipation Notes*** 

Westland and Harrington Schools . . . 

Byam School 

School Bldg. Capital Improv #5 .... 
School Bldg. Capital Improv #6 .... 

School Computer Purchase 

Sewer Plans & Design 

Capital Improv Art. 13-1986 

Capital Improv Art. 17-1987 

Sewer Construction Phase 1*** 

Conservation Land Purchase 

149. Total Interest Payments 

***Exempt Principal and Interest $1,392,000 



70,000 


$ 


$ 


100,000 


100,000 


100,000 











540,150 

















252,000 


250,000 


250,000 





575,000 


575,000 





500,000 


500,000 





175,000 


175,000 


962,150 


$ 1,600,000 


$ 1,600,000 


240,000 


$ 230,000 


$ 230,000 





550,000 


550,000 


3,010 








15,000 


9,000 


9,000 











24,307 

















32,447 


21,340 


21,340 


79,940 


100,375 


100,375 





58,190 


58,190 





342,000 


342,000 


30,205 


58,480 


58,480 



424,909 



$ 1,369,385 



$ 1,369,385 



UNDER ARTICLE 17 Dwight Hayward, Chairman of 
the Finance Committee, moved to see if the Town will vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $200,000.00 to be us- 
ed as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Com- 
mittee, as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

The Selectmen supported the article. Motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34 Dwight Hayward, Chairman of 
the Finance Committee moved that the Town vote to in- 
struct the Board of Assessors to issue a sum of $204,613.00 
from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate. 



The Moderator asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Michael McTeague moved to adjourn the meeting see- 
ing that there was no further business at hand. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 12:35 AM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



32 



REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

September 15, 1988 



U.S. SENATOR 
Joseph D. Malone 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

REP IN CONGRESS 5th Congressional District 

All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 



55 



55 



Pet 2 



■10 



40 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



52 



40 



69 



57 



52 



40 



69 



57 



44 



44 



Pet 9 



44 



44 



Total 



42 


35 


32 


46 


34 


64 


42 


36 


39 


370 
































13 


5 


9 


6 


6 


5 


15 


8 


5 


72 



442 

































55 


40 


41 


52 


40 


69 


57 


44 


44 


442 



442 



COUNCILLOR 3rd District 

Judy Dow 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



32 


34 


26 


43 


32 


58 


36 


26 


33 


320 
































23 


6 


15 


9 


8 


11 


21 


18 


11 


122 



55 



10 



52 



40 



69 



44 



44 



442 



SENATOR IN General Court 5th Middlesex 



Edward Rudnitsky 


38 


33 


27 


41 


33 


56 


37 


29 


29 


323 


All Others 
































Blanks 


17 


7 


14 


11 


7 


13 


20 


15 


15 


119 


TOTAL 


55 


40 


41 


52 


40 


69 


57 


44 


44 


442 


STATE REP General Court 16th Middlesex 






















Carol C. Cleven 


47 


35 


39 


50 


40 


69 


54 


38 


41 


413 


All Others 


1 


























1 


Blanks 


7 


5 


2 


2 








3 


6 


3 


28 


TOTAL 


55 


40 


41 


52 


40 


69 


57 


44 


44 


442 


CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex 






















All Others 
































Blanks 


55 


40 


41 


52 


40 


69 


57 


44 


44 


442 



TOTAL 



55 



40 



52 



40 



69 



57 



442 



REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex Northern 



All Others 
































Blanks 


55 


40 


41 


52 


40 


69 


57 


44 


44 


442 


TOTAL 


55 


40 


41 


52 


40 


69 


57 


44 


44 


442 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) Middlesex 






















All Othes 





1 























1 


Blanks 


110 


79 


82 


104 


80 


138 


114 


88 


88 


883 



TOTAL 



110 



80 



82 



104 



SO 



138 



114 



884 



COUNTY TREASURER Middlesex 

All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

































55 


40 


41 


52 


40 


69 


57 


44 


44 


442 



55 



40 



52 



40 



69 



44 



44 



442 



33 



DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

September 15, 1988 



Pet 1 



U.S. SENATOR 

Edward M. Kennedy 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



REP IN CONGRESS 5th Congressional District 
Chester G. Atkins 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 3rd District 
Herbert L. Connolly 
Robert B Kennedy 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 81 

•results of a recount ordered by State held on Sept. 28, 1988 



SENATOR IN General Ct. 5th Middlesex 
Carol C. Amick 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 2 



49 



49 



49 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



64 



64 



64 



104 



52 



96 



65 



104 



52 



96 



65 



104 



52 



96 



65 



78 



78 



78 



Pet 9 



50 



50 



50 



Total 



69 


34 


40 


75 


38 


83 


48 


58 


39 


484 
































12 


15 


24 


29 


14 


13 


17 


20 


11 


155 



639 



65 


32 


45 


75 


37 


75 


45 


55 


41 


470 
































16 


17 


19 


29 


15 


21 


20 


23 


9 


169 


81 


49 


64 


104 


52 


96 


65 


78 


50 


639 


11 


10 


15*14 


15 


13 


25 


11 


18 


12 


129 


60 


35 


45*45 


77 


35 


62 


42 


47 


30 


433 
































10 


4 


4* 5 


12 


4 


9 


12 


13 


8 


77 



639 



63 


37 


45 


85 


38 


73 


48 


62 


39 


490 
































18 


12 


19 


19 


14 


23 


17 


16 


11 


149 



639 



STATE REP General Court 16th Middlesex 

Henry E. Sullivan 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



65 


32 


47 


79 


30 


76 


43 


60 


31 


463 




















1 








1 


16 


17 


17 


25 


22 


20 


21 


18 


19 


175 



49 



64 



104 



52 



96 



65 



78 



50 



639 



CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex 

Edward J. Sullivan 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



63 


35 


47 


80 


34 


79 


45 


55 


34 


472 
































18 


14 


17 


24 


18 


17 


20 


23 


16 


167 



49 



64 



104 



52 



96 



65 



78 



50 



639 



REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex Northern 
Edward J. Early Jr. 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



60 


21 



49 



48 

16 



64 



82 


22 



35 


17 



73 


23 



40 



25 



104 



52 



96 



65 



56 



22 



78 



50 



464 



175 



639 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) Middlesex 

Thomas J. Larkin 

Matthew Donahue 

Edward J. Kennedy Jr. 

Joseph R. Macaluso 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY TREASURER Middlesex 

James E. Fahey Jr. 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



30 


17 


24 


32 


20 


35 


23 


21 


25 


227 


49 


27 


44 


63 


31 


56 


44 


52 


25 


391 


38 


20 


23 


55 


20 


47 


28 


29 


19 


279 


3 


9 


11 


13 


7 


8 


5 


13 


7 


76 
































42 


25 


26 


45 


26 


46 


30 


41 


24 


305 


162 


98 


128 


208 


104 


192 


130 


156 


100 


1278 


59 


33 


47 


75 


34 


73 


41 


50 


34 


446 
































22 


16 


17 


29 


18 


23 


24 


28 


16 


193 


81 


49 


64 


104 


52 


96 


65 


78 


50 


639 



34 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

September 19, 1988 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:55 
PM at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, by the 
Moderator Dennis McHugh, who recognized the presence 
of a quorum. There were 379 voters present. 

The Moderator explained the Town Meeting procedures 
and also pointed out the location of the fire exit doors 
within the auditorium. 

Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved that the reading of 
the Constable's return of service and the posting of the war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Selectman 
Dennis J. Ready moved that the reading of the entire war- 
rant be waived. It was so voted unanimously. 

Selctman Dennis J. Ready moved to allow the Executive 
Secretary, Bernard Lynch, who is a non-resident to speak 
from time to time. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Dennis J. Ready, moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from Arti- 
cle 14 of the Special Town Meeting of September 25, 1986 
the sum of $15,000.00 to the Charter Commission expense 
account, pursuant to Mass. General Laws Chapter 43B Sec- 
tion 8. 

James Geary, Chairman of the Charter Commission, ex- 
plained that the Charter Commission has been meeting 
regularly listening to speakers from various cities and towns 
concerning charters and their effects. The Commission will 
be preparing a final report in January, and a consultant 
is needed to prepare it. State law requires that the Board 
of Selectmen send a copy to every household where at least 
one registered voter resides. The mailing alone is estimated 
to be at least $5,000.00. He asked for the Town Meeting 
body's support. 

Before the Moderator could continue on, a group of peo- 
ple entered the auditorium carrying signs and standing in 
the aisles along the walls. He asked that either the signs 
be turned around or left outside the auditorium. He did 
not want the assembly to be intimidated by the signs. 
William Dalton stated that this was the right of their first 
amendment, and it would be violated if not permitted to 
stand with their signs. The Moderator asked Town Counsel 
for an opinion. James Harrington, Town Counsel explained 
that the Moderator oversees the Town Meeting and he is 
within his rights of the Town Meeting rules of order by ask- 
ing this request. The group agreed with the decision and 
left the auditorium and the meeting continued. 

The Finance Committee supported the article. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $5,500.00 in the 
Fiscal 1989 Budget under Council on Aging from Line 
Item 117 Expense to Line Item 116 Salary to maintain ex- 
isting staff. 



Executive Secretary Bernard Lynch explained that due 
to the financial cuts of the Annual Town Meeting budget 
for FY89 this department cut back on its personnel. Now 
that there is some monies available and the need is there 
for additional staffing, the Selectmen asked for support of 
the article. The Finance Committee recommended the ar- 
ticle. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectmen Dennis J. Ready moved 
that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from Arti- 
cle 14 of the Special Town Meeting of September 25, 1987 
the sum of $3,990.00 to the Fiscal 1989 Budget 
Treasurer/Collector Line Item 56 Outlay for the purpose 
of purchasing a check printer. 

James Doukszewicz, Treasurer/Tax Collector, explained 
that he had originally requested this item in his FY89 
Budget, but due to the cuts in the expenses he had to drop 
this item. This item is a necessity and will be a time saving 
factor. Presently the checks are typed by hand on carbon 
type checks, if a mistake is made, the check and copies must 
be changed by hand. The check printer will avoid any cor- 
rections that must be made by hand. The Finance Com- 
mittee supported the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved 
that the Town vote to reduce the Fiscal 1989 Budget for 
the Chelmsford School Department by the sum of 
$232,438.00 for the purpose of balancing the budget. 

Selectman Ready explained that this article and the next 
two were the amounts needed to balance the budget for 
FY89. A question was raised concerning the School Com- 
mittee's view of this article. Carl Olsson, Chairman of the 
School Committee explained that he as an individual sup- 
ported this article. The Committee as a whole hadn't seen 
this figure until tonight. James Doukszewicz, Town 
Treasurer and the Finance Committee supported the arti- 
cle. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectmen Dennis J. Ready moved 
that the Town vote to reduce the Fiscal 1989 Budget under 
Unemployment Benefits (State) Line Item 146 Expense 

by the sum of $39,268 for the purpose of balancing the 
budget. 

Selectman Ready explained that because the Town isn't 
laying off personnel at this time, then the above figure 
reflects a savings for the Town. The Finance Committee 
recommends the article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved 
that the Town vote to reduce the Fiscal 1989 Budget under 
Insurance Liability Line Item 19 Expenses by the sum 
of $60,000.00 for the purpose of balancing the budget. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Mark Gauthier, Vice Chairman 
of the Library Trustee's, gave a presentation on the article. 
He explained that the figure of $961,900.00 is 25% of the 
estimated construction cost. The other 75% needed for its 



35 



completion would be applied for through a state grant. The 
Town's portion would be broken down as follows 
$375,000.00 would be the amount needed to buy the land. 
$586,900.00 is the monies needed to show the towns good 
faith in applying for the state grant to bring the total Town's 
investment of 25 % . The deadline for applying for the grant 
is January 4, 1989. The Finance Committee spoke in favor 
of the article. David McLachlan, Chairman of the Library 
Building Committee, spoke in favor of the article. A dis- 
cussion followed with voters speaking for and against the 
article. Edward Marshall moved the question to stop 
debate. The Moderator made numerous attempts to receive 
an unanimous vote, which failed. The following tellers 
came forward and a hand count was taken: 



was found that because it was a playground it could not 
come under the jursidiction of a DPW. The Moderator ask- 
ed for a voice vote on the motion to dismiss, motion car- 
ried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 James Doukszewicz, Chairman of 
the Capital Planning Committee, moved that the Town vote 
to rescind a portion of the appropriation and a portion 
of the authorization for the Treasurer to borrow pursuant 
to Mass. General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 under Arti- 
cle 27 of the Annual Town Meeting commenced April 27, 
1987 by reducing the sum of money $112,500.00 thereby 
reducing the total authorization and appropriation under 
said Article to $2,003,481.00. 



Cheryl Warshafsky 
William Drury 
Ruth Delaney 



Jocelyn Anthony 
Jane Drury 
Judith Hass 
Edward Marshall 



Michael Anthony 
Margaret Johnson 
Carol Stark 



Result of the hand count Yes 294, No 11, motion carried 
to stop debate. The Moderator attempted for an 
unanimous vote which failed, the tellers came forward and 
conducted a hand count. The results Yes 263, No 60, %'s 
needed is 216 the motion carried and the article reads as 
follows: 

Mark Gauthier, Vice Chairman of the Library Trustees, 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
acquire by purchase, eminent domain otherwise, the pro- 
perty in fee simple, with the buildings and trees thereon, 
located on Bartlett Street in the Town of Chelmsford, Mass- 
achusetts and further described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book 2176, Page 504, 
for the purpose of constructing an addition to the Adams 
Public Library; that the sum of $961,900.00 be ap- 
propriated for this acquisition, for the design and construc- 
tion of an addition to the Adams Public Library, for the 
renovation of the existing Adams Public Library, and for 
related legal administrative, and other pertinent expenses; 
that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer with the ap- 
proval of the Selectmen be authorized to borrow the sum 
of $961,900.00 under G.L.C. 44, Section 7; and that the 
Board of Library Trustees, with the consent and under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to 
contract for and expend any federal or state aid available 
for the project and to take other action necessary for the 
project; provided, however, that this vote shall not take ef- 
fect until the Town votes to exempt from the limitation on 
total taxes imposed by G.L. C 59, Section 21 C (Proposi- 
tion 2 J /4) amounts required to pay the principal of and in- 
terest on the borrowing authorized by this vote. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Dennis J. Ready mov- 
ed that the Town vote to amend Article 14 of the Fiscal 
1989 Annual Town Meeting authorizing the Town to peti- 
tion the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to enact Special Legislation establishing 
a Town of Chelmsford Public Works Department by ad- 
ding the Varney Playground Commission to the petition 
to be included in said Public Works Department. 

Selectman 'Ready moved that the Town vote to dismiss 
this article. After Town Counsel researched this article it 



James Doukszewicz explained that the purpose of this 
article is to cancel the prior authorization allowing monies 
to be spent on certain items listed in the Capital Planning 
article. By voting this article it will be reducing the total 
sum of $2,003,481.00. The original amount authorized was 
$2,115,981.00. The Finance Committee recommended the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from 
Article 14 of the Special Town Meeting of September 25, 
1986 the sum of $2,332.00 with which to pay bills of pre- 
vious years. 

The Finance Committee recommended the article. Mo- 
tion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Selectman Dennis J. Ready moved 
that the Town vote to amend the Town of Chelmsford 
General By-laws Article VI Police Regulations by adding 
the following Section 21 Unregistered Motor Vehicle Bylaw: 
SECTION 21 UNREGISTERED MOTOR VEHICLE 
BY-LAW 

1. Except as may be provided herein, not more than 
one unregistered motor vehicle shall be placed, stored 
or kept on property except property used for busi- 
ness or industrial purposes and for a period not to 
exceed one year. No unregistered motor vehicle shall 
be stored, placed or kept on a "paper street" or private 
way. All privately owned unregistered motor vehicles 
shall be stored, placed and kept on private property. 

2. Subject to the conditions herein set forth, the Board 
of Selectmen may issue a permit authorizing an ap- 
plicant to place, store or keep more than one such 
motor vehicle on such property. 

3. Any such permit may be issued by the Board of 
Selectmen only after said Board has: 

(a) Held a public hearing on the application 
therefore, fourteen days' notice of the time, place 
and subject matter of which has been given at 
the expense of the applicant (i) by publication 
in a newspaper of general circulation in the Town 
and (ii) by registered or certified mail to the last 
known address of all owners of land abutting 
upon the property in question as appearing upon 
the Assessor's most recent tax list, and 



36 



(b) Determined that the presence of more than one 
such motor vehicle on such property (i) will not 
constitute a danger to the safety and welfare of 
the inhabitants of the Town, and (ii) will not 
create or continue a condition detrimental and 
injurious to the neighborhood in which the pro- 
perty in question is located. 

4. Each such permit that may be issued by said Board 

(a) Shall be issued as a personal privilege of the ap- 
plicant and not as a grant attached to and run- 
ning with the land, and 

(b) Shall include a reasonable time limit but not for 
a period longer than one year, and 

(c) May specify a location on the property where 
such motor vehicle or vehicles will not be expos- 
ed to the view of abutting residents or the general 
public. 

5. This By-Law does not apply 

(a) To motor vehicles in enclosed buildings or 

(b) To motor vehicles of property where the principal 
business use is a farm, garden or nursery used 
provided such motor vehicle is necessary to the 
operation of such business. 

6. The enforcing authority under this By-Law shall be 
the Chelmsford Police Department. 

7. The enforcing authority shall give written notice of 
any violation of this By-Law to the person commit- 
ting the violation. Thirty days after receipt of such 
notice of violation, the person receiving the notice 
shall be liable to a penalty of not more than fifty 
dollars for each separate offense. Each day of a con- 
tinuing violation shall constitute a separate offense. 

8. Said violation shall be punishable as provided in Ar- 
ticle 1 of the Town of Chelmsford General By-laws. 

Selectman Henrick Johnson explained that presently this 
problem is handled by the Building Inspector via the zon- 
ing by-laws, which does not state a definite time and 
amount of vehicles allowed on the property. This by-law 
would strengthen the present law by stating a certain 
amount of time a person would be allowed to have one 
unregistered car on the property plus there will be a hear- 
ing process, handled by the Board of Selectmen. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the article. Motion car- 
ried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 James Geary, representing the 
Tevlin family explained the article. At the present time the 
land is zoned residential and after trying to sell the pro- 
perty, the family wants to re-zone it to General Commer- 
cial District. However, first the family wants the Town to 
have the first option on purchasing the land at the residen- 
tial price for the possible library expansion, even after the 
zoning change is done. If the library is unable to expand, 
then the land will be sold for commercial use. The Finance 
Committee was against the motion to re-zone. James 
Douszkewicz spoke in favor of the article. He stated that 
the Tevlin family has been waiting for 2 V£ years for some 
sort of settlement between the town for a possible purchase 



and the property has been maintained and kept up and 
urged for the re-zoning. Richard Tevlin spoke in favor of 
the article. He felt that the Finance Committee did not 
do a thorough research before making their recommen- 
dation. If the property was re-zoned, the Town would 
receive more tax money due to it being in a commercial 
zone. The family has been more than fair in waiting for 
the Town to make a decision and asked for support. A dis- 
cussion took place. A number of voters spoke for and 
against the article. The Moderator read the Planning 
Board's recommendation: The Planning Board, held a 
public hearing on September 14, 1988 and voted in favor 
(7-0) of the proposal to change the zoning of Bartlett Street 
property owned by one Mary E. Tevlin from the present 
RB district (single resident) to CD district (general com- 
mercial district). The Moderator asked if there was any 
need for further discussion. Hearing none he attempted 
a voice vote which left the chair in doubt, the tellers came 
forward and conducted a hand count: Yes 244, No 47, % s 
vote of 194 needed, the motion passed and reads as follows: 

John McCarthy, Chairman of the Planning Board, 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law 
and Map by changing form RB (Residential B. District) 
to CD (General commercial District) the following describ- 
ed property owned by Mary E. Tevlin: 



The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, with the 
buildings thereon, situated on the easterly side of 
Bartlett Street, and bounded: 

Beginning at the northwesterly corner of the premises 
on the southeasterly line of said Street and at the 
southwesterly corner of land of Catherine D. Riney, 
now or formerly; thence southwesterly and souther- 
ly by said Bartlett Street, two hundred eighty-three 
and 79/100 (283.79) feet to land of Arthur G. 
Scoboria, now or formerly; thence easterly by said 
Scoboria Lane, one hundred thirty-seven and 69/100 
(137.69) feet to Lot D on a plan entitled "Plan of Land 
in Chelmsford, Mass., belonging to the estate of J. 
Adams Bartlett, surveyed September 1945 byJ.C. & 
W.T. Monahan, Civil Engineers & Surveyors," and 
recorded in Middlesex North District Deeds, Plan 
Book 71, Plan 46; thence northerly by said Lot D, 
eighty (80) feet; thence westerly by said Lot D, fif- 
teen (15) feet, more or less, to Lot B on said Plan; 
thence notheasterly still by said Lot D, one hundred 
sixty-eight and 96/100 (168.96) feet to said Riney 
Land; thence northwesterly by said Riney Land, 
eighty-nine and 63/100 (89.63) feet to the point of 
beginning. 

A portion of the premises being shown as Lots B & 
C on said plan and the remaining part of said pre- 
mises being shown on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land 
in Chelmsford, Mass. belonging to J. Adams Bart- 
lett, surveyed April 16, 1896 Smith & Brooks Civil 
Engineers" and recorded with said Deeds, Plan Book 
12, Plan 24, containing twenty-seven thousand nine 
hundred eighty-four (27,984) square feet more or less, 
all as shown in the deed recorded at Book 2176, Page 
504. 



37 



UNDER ARTICLE 13 Kathleen Hillman moved to 
amend her motion as follows: 

First: To amend the heading to the by-law to read "sec- 
tion 22 Prohibition of trapping by means of the leghold 
and conibear trap." 

Second: To amend subsection 1 to read "It shall be pro- 
hibited and unlawful for any person to set, trigger, activate, 
or otherwise use or cause to be set, triggered, activated or 
used any steel jawed leghold or conibear trap to be used 
for the capture of any animal." 

She then yielded the floor to James McBride who wanted 
to amend the motion also. The Moderator won't allow the 
McBride amendment at this time, but would allow the dis- 
cussion because it was connected to the Hillman amend- 
ment. A discussion took place and James McBride then 
yielded the floor back to Kathleen Hillman who in turn 
discussed her motion to amend. She also explained that 
she had there in the hall, three non-resident experts who 
could answer further questions about the effects of trap- 
ping on beavers and other animals. Plus she had a video 
that she wanted to present to the Town Meeting Body. The 
Moderator explained that the three "experts" would have 
to be voted individual permission allowing them to speak 
before the Town Meeting Body. The Town Meeting Body 
expressed their opposition on viewing the film. The 
Moderator started to ask for a voice vote granting permis- 
sion for one of the non-residents to speak when Joseph 
Paolilli questioned the quorum. 

The Moderator called the tellers to come forward and 
begin a quorum count when Mr. Paolilli withdrew his mo- 
tion questioning the quorum. Selectman Dennis Ready 
then moved to table Article 13 at this time, due to it seem- 
ing like a lengthy discussion was going to take place, in 
order to act on Article 14. The Finance Committee was 
in favor of the motion to table. The Moderator attempted 
an unsuccessful voice vote, the tellers came forward and 
conducted a hand count. Yes 167, No 81, motion carried 
to table Article 13. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Selectman Dennis J. Ready 
moved that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate from 
Article 14 of the Special Town Meeting of September 25, 
1986 the sum of $62,000.00 for the purpose of increasing 
the Police Department Fiscal 1989 Budget Line Item 76 
Salary, to fund negotiated Wage and Salary increases. 

Bernard Lynch explained that the Town negotiated with 
the Police Union and agreed to use civilian dispatchers 
which would save the Town money. He urged the Town to 
vote for this article. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. William Dalton moved the question. The 
Moderator asked if there was anyone else wishing to speak, 
hearing none he asked for a voice vote, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

Selectman Ready moved to remove Article 13 from the 
table. The Finance Committee was also in favor. Motion 
carried, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 13 Before any further discussion of 
this article could take place, Joseph Paolilli questioned the 
presence of a quorum. James McBride moved to adjourn 
the Special Town Meeting until Monday evening at 8:15 
PM September 26, 1988 at the McCarthy Middle School 
Auditorium. A question was raised on how the Town 
Meeting Body could vote on anything further if there was 
no quorum. The Moderator explained that a quorum need 
not be present in order to adjourn a meeting to a certain 
place and time. A discussion took place place. A question 
was raised on why there was a debate going on about ad- 
journing when the actual question should be about the 
quorum being present. Town Counel ruled that if a ques- 
tion is raised concerning adjournment that takes presidence 
over any other motion on the floor. More discussion took 
place. Patricia Griffin moved the question to stop debate 
about adjournment. The Moderator asked for any need 
for further discussion, hearing none he asked for a voice 
vote, which left the chair in doubt. He asked for the voters 
to raise their tickets, motion carried to adjourn until Mon- 
day, September 26, 1988, at 8:15 PM at the McCarthy Mid- 
dle School Auditorium. The meeting adjourned at 10:20 
PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

September 26, 1988 

The Adjourned Special Town Meeting was called to order 
at 8:35 PM at the McCarthy Middle School Auditorium, 
by the Moderator who recognized the presence of a 
quorum. There were 312 voters present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 The Moderator read the article 
and the motion to amend by Kathleen Hillman. 

Section 22. Prohibition of Trapping 

1. It shall be prohibited and unlawful for any person 
to trap fur bearing mammals within the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

2. The definitions set forth in General Law Chapter 131, 
Section 1 of "to Trap," as said act applies to fur bear- 
ing mammals, are incorporated herewithin. 

3. The Police Department and/or Animal Control Of- 
ficer of Chelmsford shall be authorized to enforce this 
By-law pursuant to Article 1 of the Town of Chelms- 
ford By-laws. 

4. The fine for each violation of this section shall be 
Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00), with each viola- 
tion constituting a separate offense. Said violations 
shall be punishable as provided in Article 1 of the 
Town of Chelmsford By-laws. 



38 



The motion to amend is as follows: 

First: To amend the heading to the by-law to read "sec- 
tion 22 Prohibition of trapping by means of the leghold 
and conibear trap." 

Second: To amend subsection 1 to read "It shall be pro- 
hibited and unlawful for any person to set, trigger, activate, 
or otherwise use or cause or be set, triggered, activated or 
used any steel jawed leghold or conibear trap to be used 
for the capture of any animal." 

Kathleen Hillman spoke about her motion to amend the 
article. The Moderator asked for any further discussion 
concerning the motion to amend. Rene LaRouche spoke 
against the article and the motion to amend. He express- 
ed his views and concerns of the Town's cost factor on main- 
taining the beaver population in his area. His home abutts 
Deep Brook and has had problems with the beavers 
building dams and flooding his area. The only way there 
was any control of the population and problems was 
through trapping. At this point Kathleen Hillman broke 
in and read a letter from the N.E. Director of the Friends 
of Animals Steve Ruggeri which addressed this problem: 
"Please be advised that the New England Office of Friends 
of Animals, Inc. is prepared to provide assistance to the 
Town of Chelmsford, Ma. or to any local resident by 
developing and implementing nuisance wildlife control 
projects which strictly and exclusively employ non-lethal 
measures." Rene LaRouche continued discussing his con- 
cerns. Selectman Henrick Johnson then spoke about the 
article and explained that he had experienced a situation 
with a trap as a child and felt that this article and the 
amendment should be voted on. Fran McDougall also 
spoke about her dog being caught in a trap. James McBride 
moved the question to stop any further debate on the 
amendment. The Moderator attempted a voice vote which 
failed the following tellers came forward to conduct a hand 
count: 



David McLachlan 
Jocelyn Anthony 
Peter Bagni 



Jean Horgan 
Ruth Delaney 
Gail Klemmer 
Phil Currier 



Michal Anthony 
Barbara Ward 
Daniel Burke 



At this point Donna Luedecke questioned the presence 
of a quorum. The Moderator instructed the tellers to count 
the total number of voters present in the hall. The result 
was 310 voters present, the quorum by-law requires that 
300 voters be present. The Moderator then asked the tellers 
to continue taking the hand count on the motion to stop 
debate on the motion to amend. The result of the hand 
count: Yes 271, No 8, % s is 186, the motion passes. The 
Moderator asked for a voice vote on the main motion as 
amended, motion carried, unanimously. 

Philip Currier moved the question to stop any further 
debate on the main motion as amended. The Moderator 
attempted a voice vote which failed, the tellers came for- 
ward and conducted a hand count. The result was Yes 261, 
No 8, %'s is 178 the motion passes. The Moderator started 
to take a voice vote on the main motion as amended. Donna 
Luedecke questioned the quorum present, stating that at 
least 10 people had left the hall and requested a count be 



taken. The Moderator ruled the request out of order stating 
that only an estimated time of 5-10 minutes had passed 
since the last count. He asked for a voice vote on the main 
motion as amended. Motion carried and the article reads 
as follows: 

Kathleen Hillman moved that the Town vote to amend 
the General By-Laws, Article VI, Police Regulations by ad- 
ding the following Section 22. Prohibition of Trapping by 
means of the leghold and conibear trap: Section 22. Pro- 
hibition of Trapping 

1. It shall be prohibited and unlawful for any person 
to set, trigger, activate, or otherwise use or cause to 
be set, triggered, activated or used any steel jawed 
leghold or conibear trap to be used for the capture 
of any animal." 

2. The definitions set forth in General Law Chapter 131, 
Section 1 of "to trap," as said act applies to fur bear- 
ing mammals, are incorporated herewithin. 

3. The Police Department and/or Animal Control Of- 
ficer of Chelmsford shall be authorized to enforce this 
By-law pursuant to Article 1 of the Town of Chelms- 
ford General By-laws. 

4. The fine for each violation of this section shall be 
Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00), with each viola- 
tion constituting a separate offense. Said violations 
shall be punishable as provided in Article 1 of the 
Town of Chelmsford By-laws. 

James McBride thanked the voters for attending the 
meeting and seeing that there was no further business at 
hand moved to adjourn the meeting. Motion carried, 
unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 9:35 PM. 



Dennis McHugh, 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 



WARRANT FOR THE 
SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

November 1, 1988 

Middlesex, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of said 
Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, Viz: 

Precinct 1. Town Office Building Gymnasium 
Precinct 2. Harrington School Gymnasium 
Precinct 3. Harrington School Gymnasium 
Precinct 4.Westland School Cafeteria 



39 



Precinct 5.Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6.Westland School Cafeteria 
Precinct 7. McCarthy Middle School, Small 

Gymnasium 
Precinct 8. McCarthy Middles School, Small 

Gymnasium 
Precinct 9. Town Office Building Gymnasium 

On Tuesday, the first day of November, 1988 from 10:00 
AM to 8:00 PM, for the following purpose: 

To vote on the following question: 



Question 1. 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford be allowed to exempt from 
the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, 
the amounts required to pay the bonds to be issued in order 
to acquire a certain parcel of land and construct thereon 
an addition to the Adams Public Library and to renovate 
the existing library building, all as described under Arti- 
cle 7 of the warrant for the September 19, 1988 special town 
meeting? 

Yes 
No 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

November 1, 1988 



Question 1 

Yes 
No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Pet 1 



309 



Pet 2 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



233 



282 



315 



366 



376 



346 



268 



Pet 9 TOTAL 



132 


82 


188 


126 


162 


187 


221 


110 


163 


1371 


176 


151 


94 


189 


204 


189 


125 


158 


150 


1436 


1 























1 


2 



314 



2809 



40 



STATE ELECTION 

November 8, 1988 



*state indicated possible write-in candidates 
**The Offices of Pres. & Senator will reflect diff. totals due to Fed. absentee ballots counted. 



PRESIDENT & VICE PRESIDENT 

Bush & Quayle 

Dukakis & Bentsen 

Fulani & Dattner 

Paul & Marrou 

Kenoyer & Ehrenreich* 

Dodge & Ormsby* 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL** 



Pet 1 

1029 
729 

2 
17 



27 



Pet 2 

1084 
816 
6 
28 


4 
15 



Pet 3 

1037 
683 

1 
27 


1 
13 



Pet 4 

920 
766 

4 
28 



29 



Pet 5 

1222 

783 

4 

26 







27 



Pet 6 

1095 

746 

1 

24 





1 

24 



Pet 7 

1259 

788 



28 





1 

28 



Pet 8 

983 

813 
6 
24 


2 
21 



Pet 9 TOTAL 



1156 

750 

4 

20 





3 

29 



9785 

6874 

28 

222 





12 

213 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1891 



2104 



1849 



1962 



17134 



SENATOR & CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy 

Joseph D. Malone 

Mary Fridley 

Freda Lee Nason 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL** 



993 


1095 


965 


1015 


1104 


1002 


1039 


1083 


1009 


9305 


767 


794 


756 


687 


888 


839 


1000 


712 


890 


7333 


6 


5 


7 


1 


14 


10 


6 


7 


9 


65 


8 


12 


10 


8 


10 


9 


13 


12 


14 


96 














1 














1 


30 


47 


24 


36 


45 


31 


45 


35 


40 


333 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1891 



2103 



1849 



1962 



17131 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Chester G. Atkins 

T David Hudson 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



1386 


1452 


1372 


1312 


1561 


1440 


1561 


1401 


1484 


12969 


217 


285 


228 


247 


306 


240 


296 


241 


258 


2318 




















1 








1 


201 


216 


162 


188 


195 


210 


244 


207 


220 


1843 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



COUNCILLOR 
Jody Dow 
Robert B. Kennedy 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



601 


587 


612 


515 


727 


653 


788 


582 


738 


5803 


992 


1152 


981 


1064 


1084 


1050 


1061 


1077 


1014 


9475 


211 


214 


169 


168 


251 


187 


253 


190 


210 


1853 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



SENATOR IN GEN 
Carol C. Amick 
Edward Rudnitsky 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



CT 5th Middlesex. 



1157 


1208 


1133 


1122 


1272 


1186 


1278 


1188 


1175 


10718 


460 


527 


475 


429 


549 


534 


612 


501 


610 


4697 


187 


218 


154 


196 


241 


170 


212 


160 


178 


1716 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GEN. 

Carol C. Cleven 

Henry E. Sullivan 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



CT. 16th Middlesex 



1305 


1066 


1122 


952 


1255 


1148 


1326 


1027 


1255 


10186 


631 


726 


509 


623 


604 


598 


614 


712 


557 


5574 


1 


























1 


137 


161 


131 


172 


203 


144 


162 


110 


150 


1370 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex County 
Edward J. Sullivan 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



1204 


1381 


1184 


1206 


1350 


1278 


1338 


1301 


1279 


11521 


2 























1 


3 


598 


4572 


578 


541 


712 


612 


764 


548 


682 


5607 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex 
Edward J. Early Jr. 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) Middlesex County 

Thomas J. Larkin 

Edward J. Kennedy Jr. 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



1189 


1386 


1178 


1192 


1341 


1276 


1324 


1296 


1252 


11416 


2 


























2 


613 


585 


584 


555 


721 


614 


778 


553 


710 


5713 



1804 



3608 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



3906 



3524 



3492 



4124 



3778 



4204 



3698 



1962 



3920 



17131 



816 


779 


771 


730 


865 


778 


878 


761 


891 


7269 


877 


1072 


836 


931 


988 


963 


992 


1002 


909 


8570 








1 





1 














2 


1915 


2055 


1916 


1833 


2270 


2039 


2334 


1935 


2124 


18421 



34262 



41 



Pet 1 



Pet 2 



Pet 3 



Pet 4 



Pet 5 



Pet 6 



Pet 7 



Pet 8 



Pet 9 



Total 



TREASURER Middlesex County 
James E. Fahey Jr. 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



1203 


1333 


1189 


1193 


1327 


1243 


1325 


1236 


1228 


11277 


2 























2 




599 


620 


573 


554 


735 


647 


777 


613 


733 


5852 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



QUESTION 1 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



245 


277 


244 


220 


274 


257 


304 


270 


279 


2370 


1499 


1622 


1489 


1460 


1732 


1562 


1755 


1531 


1646 


14296 


60 


54 


29 


67 


56 


71 


43 


48 


37 


465 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



QUESTION 2 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



893 


988 


959 


834 


1082 


1022 


1231 


953 


1090 


9052 


873 


932 


767 


860 


942 


819 


827 


841 


831 


7692 


38 


33 


36 


53 


38 


49 


44 


55 


41 


387 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



QUESTION 3 
Yes 

No 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



385 


450 


355 


360 


371 


413 


498 


436 


429 


3697 


1371 


1459 


1381 


1323 


1643 


1407 


1571 


1372 


1498 


13025 


48 


44 


26 


64 


48 


70 


33 


41 


35 


409 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



QUESTION 4 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



458 


505 


375 


431 


490 


447 


506 


481 


468 


4161 


1300 


1419 


1367 


1268 


1526 


1403 


1563 


1325 


1471 


12642 


46 


29 


20 


48 


46 


40 


33 


43 


23 


328 



1804 



1953 



1762 



1747 



2062 



1890 



2102 



1849 



1962 



17131 



42 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 
Dennis E. McHugh 
Term Expires 1990 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Term Expires 1990 

Board of Assessors Elected 3 Yr Term 

Diane M. Phillips Term Expires 1990 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1989 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. (appointed 1987) Term Expires 1988 
Richard P. Tevlin Term Expires 1991 

Cemetery Commission Elected 3 Yr Term 

Charlotte P. DeWolf Term Expires 1990 

Gerald L. Hardy Term Expires 1989 

Dr. Everett V. Olsen Term Expires 1991 

Cemetery Supt: Frank R. Peterson 

Constable Elected 3 Yr Term 1989 

William E. Spence 

Board of Health Elected 3 Yr Term 

Mark W. Gauthier Term Expires 1990 

Paul J. Canniff Term Expires 1989 

Paul F. McCarthy Term Expires 1991 

Director: Richard J. Day 

Chelmsford Housing Authority Elected 5 Yr Term 

Lynn M. Marcella Term Expires 1992 

William P. Keohane Term Expires 1991 

Ruth K. Delaney Term Expires 1990 

Robert L. Hughes Term Expires 1991 

Pamela Turnbull GovApt 7/93 

Director: Lisa Royce 

Library Trustees Elected 3 Yr Term 

Elizabeth A. McCarthy Term Expires 1990 

D. Lorraine Lambert Term Expires 1990 

Janet B. Hendl Term Expires 1989 

Brenda M. McDermott Term Expires 1989 

Susan G. Cantin Term Expires 1991 

Mark W. Gauthier Term Expires 1991 

Park Commissioners Elected 3 Yr Term 

Mary P. Bennett Term Expires 1990 

Eileen M. Duffy Term Expires 1989 

Robert L. Wetmore Term Expires 1988 

Walter L. Kivlan Term Expires 1991 

Park Supt: Donald P. Gray 

Planning Board Elected 3 Yr Term 

Eugene E. Gilet Term Expires 1990 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Term Expires 1990 

Ann H. McCarthy Term Expires 1989 

John F McCarthy Term Expires 1989 

Rosalind M. Boyle Term Expires 1988 

Kim J. MacKenzie Term Expires 1991 

James P. Good Term Expires 1991 

Christine A. Gleason Term Expires 1991 



School Committee Elected 3 Yr Term 

Samuel Poulten Term Expires 1990 

Carol W. Merriam Term Expires 1990 

Carl A. Olsson Term Expires 1989 

James Brough (resigned 1988) 

Nicholas G. Gavriel Term Expires 1988 

Barbara H. Ward Term Expires 1991 

Wendy C. Marcks (appointed) Term Expires 1989 

Selectmen Elected 3 Yr Term 

Roger A. Blomgren Term Expires 1990 

Dennis J. Ready Term Expires 1989 

Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. Term Expires 1989 

Bonita A. Towle Term Expires 1991 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1988 

Bradford O. Emerson Term Expires 1991 

Executive Secretary: Bernard Lynch 

Sewer Commissioners Elected 3 Yr Term 

Jean R. Organ, (resigned 1988) 

John P. Emerson, Jr. Term Expires 1989 

Barry B. Balan Term Expires 1991 

Robert P. Joyce (appointed 1988) Term Expires 1989 

Town Treasurer/Tax Collector Elected 3 Yr Term 1990 
James R. Doukszewicz 



Tree Warden 

Frank Wojtas 



Elected 3 Yr Term 1990 



Varney Playground Commission 

Elec ATM Vote 3 Yr Term 

Bernard Battle Term Expires 1988 

Donald T Wholey Term Expires 1991 

Norbert J. McHale Term Expires 1989 

Harry J. Ayotte Term Expires 1990 

Finance Committee Appointed by Moderator 

Peter V. Lawlor Term Expires 9/89 

Dwight M. Hayward Term Expires 12/91 

Myra Silver Term Expires 1/92 

Cheryl Boss Term Expires 11/90 

Donald Elias Term Expires 10/89 

William Logan Term Expires 11/90 

Stephen A. Cain Term Expires 1/92 

Fire Chief 

Robert L. Hughes 

Dep. Chief: James Sousa 



Highway Superintendent 

Michael Crory 

Police Chief 

Raymond McKeon 
Dep. Chief: Pennryn Fitts 
James Greska 



1 Yr Term Exp 7/89 



43 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Ruth K. Delaney, M.A.A., Chairman 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A. Richard Tevlin 

Nancy L. Maher, Assistant to the Assessors 

Personnel 

Marie Ronan, Principal Clerk 

Elaine McBride, Principal Clerk 

Elaine Meyers, Senior Clerk 

The year 1988 was spent updating fiscal year 1989 pro- 
perty values to comply with the Department of Revenue 
requirements that these values be updated every three years, 
to reflect the current market value of property in 
Chelmsford. 

Preliminary bills for FY89 were sent out in November 
of 1988. The final bills for FY89 will be mailed in the 
Spring of 1989, following the approval of the Department 
of Revenue reflecting the re-certified values. 

The Board of Assessors wishes to extend best wishes to 
Evelyn M. Philbrook who retired as Principal Clerk on June 
30, 1988. Evelyn completed 28 years in the Assessors' Office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane M. Phillips, M.A.A. 
Board of Assessors 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to take this oppor- 
tunity to report to the Citizens of Chelmsford on signifi- 
cant milestone events of 1988. 

A 42% increase in interments made 1988 the busiest year 
in the history of the Chelmsford Cemeteries. 

A 36% increase in the sale of lots was also a new high. 

Cemetery staff began installation of monument founda- 
tions, which work was formerly done by an outside 
contractor. 

Cemetery staff undertook a project, funded by the State, 
for rehabilitation of Veterans' graves. 

As a result of these activities, funds turned over to the 
Town Treasurer increased from $49,115 in 1987 to $80,511 
in 1988. 

Sources of these funds for 1987 and 1988 were as follows: 



Sale of Graves and Lots 
Interments and Other Fees 
Foundation Installation 
Veterans' Grave Rehabilitation 

Total 



1987 


1988 


$36,245 


$48,241 


12,870 


18,378 





11,792 





2,100 



$49,115 



1,511 



The increase in Interments and Other Fees is a result 
of the high level of activity in 1988. This, together with 
the Foundation Installation and Veterans' Grave Rehabilita- 
tion work represents $32,270 going into the Town's General 
Fund and compares to $12,870 contributed to the General 
Fund in 1987. 

Programs for beautification and rehabilitation of the 
Chelmsford Cemeteries went forward and included plan- 
ting of shade and screening trees in Heart Pond, West 
Chelmsford, Fairview and Pine Ridge Cemeteries. Shrub 
plantings in Fairview and Pine Ridge Cemeteries were also 
accomplished. 

Rehabilitation of many monuments in the inactive sec- 
tions of Forefathers', West Chelmsford and Riverside 
Cemeteries was accomplished. Emphasis has been on the 
correction of heavy, tipped -over monuments with the ma- 
jor effort concentrated in Riverside Cemetery. 

Other projects in this period include rebuilding the Pine 
Ridge pumping station after 25 years of service. 

A reinforced concrete flammable liquids storage shed has 
been erected behind our Garage. 

Fence repair and replacement at Pine Ridge, Riverside 
and Fairview Cemeteries was also accomplished. 

Because of the increased use of Town Cemeteries the 
Cemetery Commission has begun formulating a Master 
Plan for future development of both Pine Ridge and Fair- 
view Cemeteries. The first step has been to have the 
Cemetery land surveyed and stone bounds are to be install- 
ed at the corners of the properties. The next step will make 
it possible to designate the order and manner in which 
future sections in these Cemeteries will be laid out and 
developed. 

Improvement in our data handling system is under ac- 
tive consideration since space and workload problems have 
increased to such an extent that a change is necessary. It 
is hoped to resolve these issues in 1989. 

The Cemetery Commission would like to acknowledge 
our indebtedness and express thanks on behalf of the Town 
of Chelmsford to: 

• William and Jane Drury, for their tireless and con- 
tinuing work over the years in documenting the loca- 
tion, inscription and condition of the monuments 
and markers in the historical section of Forefather's 
Cemetery. Without their work, no useful future at- 
tempts at preservation of these memorials for future 
generations would be possible. 

• The family of John R. Carson, for replacing a storm- 
damaged tree in Pine Ridge Cemetery with a 
beautiful dogwood speciment tree. 

• Our Veternas' Agent, Mary McAuliffe and State 
Representative Carol Cleven for their assistance in ob- 
taining the grant for Veterans' Grave Rehabilitation. 



44 



• Mr. Raymond J. Greenwood for his generous dona- 
tion of the new reinforced concrete flammable liquids 
storage shed. 

The Commission also expresses its thanks to the 
Cemetery Staff, consisting of Richard Nawoichik, Jorge 
Caires, Kenneth Frazier, Michael Gervais, Eileen Johnson 
and our summer help, Cesar DeCaires and John Sousa. By 
their diligent efforts and attention to detail we have been 
able to provide the townspeople and their families respect- 
ful and dignified services in their time of need. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members 

Chairman Paul McCarthy 

Vice Chairman Dr. Paul Canniff 

Clerk Mark Gauthier 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health 
Health Inspector/ Asst. 
Departmental Assistant 
Town Nurse 
Town Physician 



Richard J. Day 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Diana L. Wright 

Judith Dunigan, R.N. 

Michael Dean, M.D. 



Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1988 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement Pro- 
gram continued its effort to clean up our waterways. The 
Board of Health has continued to run its dye testing and 
water sampling program and positive results are being seen. 
Numerous tests have been performed by the Board of 
Health along with the issuance of one-hundred twenty-nine 
septic system permits for repairs and one-hundred ten septic 
system permits for new construction with an increasing 
percentage of commercial, industrial and condominium 
buildings. The Board has again instituted new regulations 
to more specifically address further protection of water 
quality in town. 

Administration and Managment 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 

Percolation Tests -102 $ 5,100 

Deep Tests- 355 17,750 

Sewage Hole Repair Permits— 129 3,215 

Sewage Construction Permits — 110 5,570 

Miscellaneous License & Fees 17,434 

Complaint and Inspectional Services 

During 1988 six inspections were made at new and ex- 
isting day care centers; sixty-nine inspections made for 
Chapter II, Housing; eight school inspections; two -hundred 
eighty-eight complaints received and checked, Camp Paul 
inspections; thirty bathing beaches inspections; three In- 
ternational Certificates of Vaccination, restaurant and 
retail food store inspections; one-hundred eight 
establishments in town inspected twice a year. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was reap- 
pointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's Hazar- 



dous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator to en- 
force the new "Right -to -Know" law for this town. Mr. Day 
has initiated a Right-To-Know program for all town 
employees. The position encompasses actions between the 
State, Federal agencies, business community and general 
public. 

Household Hazardous Waste Day 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewaters has open- 
ed up a whole new area to be monitored. A continuing 
number of incidents have required a cooperative effort bet- 
ween the town and DEQE officials. It is the goal of the 
Board of Health, along with other town departments, to 
keep abreast of all current changes and updates in the 
handling and disposal of all toxic wastes and to supersede 
any State and Federal standards where it would best serve 
to protect this community and its precious water supplies. 
With this in mind, the Board of Health has held a special 
waste oil only collection on July 30, 1988 and its annual 
Household Hazardous Waste Day on November 19, 1988. 
They were both great successes, removing thirty barrels of 
hazardous waste, 1 , 300 gallons of waste oil and four dozen 
batteries from the town. 

Communicable Disease Program 

The Massachusetts Department of Public Health man- 
dates that an epidemiological investigation be undertaken 
on approximately forty-eight communicable diseases. 
When a communicable disease is reported to the Health 
Department by a physician or hospital, the nurse contacts 
the person involved to ascertain if a probable source of the 
infection can be determined. In some communicable 
diseases it is necessary that food handlers or family 
members are removed from their jobs during the period 
of communicability. The follow-up report is submitted to 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Reports 
on the following diseases were completed during 1988: 

Hepatitis B 1 

Salmonella 19 

Campylobacter Enteritis 10 

Giardiasis 5 

Bacterial Meningitis 2 

Viral Meningitis 1 

Yersiniosis 1 

Active Tuberculosis 2 

Tuberculosis Control 48 
Program* 

•Referrals received from the Lowell Chest Clinic and 
Middlesex Community Hospital TB Clinic. 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and those 
persons whose employment require certification of freedom 
from that disease is another responsibility of the Town 
Nurse. One-hundred sixty-four mantoux (TB) tests were 
given to town residents for pre-employment and to 
household contacts of active cases in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health regulations. 
Persons with positive test results are referred to the Lowell 
Chest Clinic for follow-up. Home visits and telephone calls 
are made to families of active and some inactive tuber- 
culosis cases on a periodic basis to insure understanding 
of the illness and that adequate medical follow-up is achiev- 



45 



ed. Numerous medical records are kept and updated on 
residents who have a positive (TB) mantoux test and are 
receiving medication prophylactically and being followed 
radiologically at the Lowell Chest Clinic. 

AIDS and Venereal Disease are reported by the physi- 
cian directly to the State Department of Public Health to 
maintain patient confidentiality. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health and Council on Aging sponsored 
two flu clinics this year. Fifty persons were immunized with 
pneumonia vaccine and Seven-hundred Seventy-eight per- 
sons were immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. An addi- 
tional two-hundred thirty doses were given to nursing 
homes, thirty doses to school nurses for staff, eight home 
visits were made to handicapped or house-bound residents 
and thirty-two visits to McFarlin Manor and Chelmsford 
Arms. A total of one -thousand seventy-eight doses of flu 
vaccine were administered in town, provided free by the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 

Several immunizations were administered to update 
students records in compliance with the Massachusetts 
School Immunization Laws and prophylactically to 
residents traveling to underdeveloped countries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the first 
Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the Board 
of Health, Town Offices. 

Diabetic Screening Program 

The Health Department has an Ames Glucometer for 
the purpose of conducting blood sugar screenings. The pro- 
cedure takes a short time, involves a small sample of blood 
by finger prick method, and can be done either fasting or 
two hours after meals. Residents may call the Health 
Department office and make an appointment with the 
nurse at 250-1158. 

Cholesterol Screening Program 

Cholesterol screenings were offered to residents three 
times during the year. A nominal fee was charged and the 
dates were announced in the newspapers several weeks prior 
to the screening. These screenings will now be offered mon- 
thly by appointment. Call the nurse at 250-1158 for an 
appointment. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Health Department offers free lead paint testing of 
children between ages nine months and six years. The pro- 
cedure takes a short time and involves a small sample of 
blood by finger prick method. The blood sample is then 
sent to the State lab for testing. We will forward the results 
to your physician. Residents may call the Health Dept. at 
250-1158 and make an appointment with the nurse. 

Health Fair 

The Town's fifth Health Fair will be held on Saturday, 
May 13, 1989 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at a location 
to be announced in Westford. This will be held in con- 
junction with the Westford Health Department and be 
open to both Chelmsford and Westford residents. Free 



screenings to be offered include: blood pressure, height, 
weight, vision, glaucoma, blood sugar, blood chemistry to 
include a cardiac risk profile plus many more. Details will 
be announced in the newspapers or call the Health Dept. 
at 250-1158. 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING AUTHORITY 
INTRODUCTION 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commis- 
sioners worked diligently over the past year to develop long 
range goals and new housing programs compatible with 
the existing needs of the Community. The Commissioners 
implemented a new Modernization Program for McFarlin 
Manor and Chelmsford Arms, applied for additional ren- 
tal assistance certificates and applied and received the 
Comprehensive Permit for the construction of Elderly and 
Family Housing on three sites. Additionally, the Commis- 
sioners attended a dedication of the Brick Kiln Develop- 
ment, which was built with bonds issued by the Authori- 
ty. The Development contains 180 units of mixed income 
rental housing. 

During the course of the year, the Commissioners and 
staff also instituted and implemented programs to insure 
the continued upgrading of the existing housing units, and 
increased the efficiency of the day to day administrative 
functions. The staff conducted maintenance inspections 
of existing units. Due to a substantial increase in the work 
load, a computer system was purchased. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Authoritys' program expansion engendered a 
significant increase in the work load for the Administra- 
tion Staff. The acquisition of new programs and the in- 
creased work load prompted the Board of Commissioners 
to purchase a computer system with funds provided by the 
Teller Program for such a purchase. Along with the ac- 
quisition of the computer system, the hiring of a part-time 
junior clerk last year has made the office more efficient. 

The Administration staff continues to receive training. 
Workshops and seminars sponsored by the Executive Of- 
fice of Communities and Development, MASS NAHRO, 
Section 8 Administration Association, and the North Shore 
Executive Directors Association were the major sources of 
training. The Authority Commissioners attend training 
seminars sponsored by the Executive Office of Communities 
and Development as well as the Annual MASS NAHRO 
Conference. 

EXISTING PROGRAMS 

The Authority manages and maintains 120 units of 
Elderly Housing at 3 sites and an 8 unit Community Resi- 
dence. The Authoritys' rental assistance programs include 
31 units of State- Aided Chapter 707 Certificates for Elderly 
and Family applicants and 127 certificates of Federally- 
Aided Section 8 Elderly and Family Housing. 



46 



The demand for housing continues to exceed availabili- 
ty. Currently, the Authority has over 150 applications for 
Elderly Housing and in excess of 250 applications for Fami- 
ly Housing. This translates into a 5 year waiting period 
for Elderly Families from the time of application to the 
actual assignment of units. The waiting period for families 
is approximately 3 years. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authoritys' June 1 988 year end 
Operating Statement lists assets at $3,819,584.37; liabilities 
at $3,819,584.37. 

NEW PROGRAMS 

In July 1986, the Authority received an award from the 
Executive Office of Communities and Development. These 
State-Aided units will be constructed on 3 sites, all of which 
were donated to the Authority by the Town of Chelmsford. 
With the exception of the Highland School, which will be 
rehabilitated, the units will be new construction. 

The Authority, in June of 1988 received its Comprehen- 
sive Permit from the Board of Appeals. Request for con- 
struction bids were advertised soon afterward. The pro- 
jected occupancy date of these units is the Spring of 1990. 

The Authority had the unique distinction of par- 
ticipating with a private developer in a project which 
culminated in construction of 180 units of mixed income 
rental housing. The Authority issued bonds to finance the 
construction of the project, which included 36 low and 
moderate income units. Only a few Authoritys' have been 
successful in implementing this innovative program. 

The Commissioners attended the dedication of these 
units in December 1987, and placed income eligible 
residents in units in February 1988. 

For the past several years, Federal Funds for Housing 
Programs have decreased. However, the Authority success- 
fully obtained funding for 16 Voucher units. This program 
entitles participants to receive housing assistance payments 
for units in the private housing market. The participants 
are required, as in all Federally Funded Programs, to pay 
at least 30% of their gross income for rent, with the 
Authority subsidizing the remainder. 

MAINTENANCE 

The Authoritys' maintenance staff continues to provide 
excellent service. Their implementation of the Authoritys' 
preventative maintenance program, answering emergen- 
cy calls and tending to the day to day maintenance needs 
of the development has won the staff praise from the 
residents. Their effectiveness and high standards has 
helped to increase the quality of life of the residents. 

The maintenance staff, due to reductions in budgets by 
the State has had to resort to innovative means to proper- 



ly maintain Authority property. The maintenance depart- 
ment contacted the Department of Correction Work 
Release Program to paint the hallways and Community 
Building of the Chelmsford Arms Development. The 
Authority would not have been able to obtain the funding 
due to fiscal constraints. 

The Annual Inspections conducted by the Executive 
Director and the maintenance staff is a significant com- 
ponent of the Authoritys' preventative maintenance pro- 
gram. The inspections provide information on the condi- 
tions of the structures, apartments, grounds and systems. 
In addition to alerting the Authority to existing problems 
which require immediate attention, the inspection provides 
information useful in budget preparations and planning 
modernization programs. 

MODERNIZATION 

During the year, the Authority received funding from 
the Executive Office of Communities and Development in 
the amount of approximately $65,840 for modernization 
projects. The Authority is still working to complete these 
projects. 

The funds were utilized to provide back flow devices for 
Chelmsford Arms and McFarlin Manor as required by the 
State Board of Health, a new bathroom floor for the Com- 
munity Residence and painting for McFarlin Manor. Still 
pending are new gas boilers for Chelmsford Arms and vinyl 
siding for the Community Residence. The Authority an- 
ticipates all modernization work to be completed by the 
Spring of 1989. The architectural firm of MGIA is acting 
as consultants for the gas boilers and vinyl siding projects. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 

The Chelmsford Housing Authoritys' Board of Commis- 
sioners is composed of five citizen members appointed to 
five year staggered terms. Four of the members are elected 
in the general election by the citizens of Chelmsford. One 
member is appointed by the Secretary of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, Executive Office of Communities 
and Development. 

BOARD MEMBERS 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of Commis- 
sioners holds regular meetings on the first Tuesday of each 
month at 7:30 p.m., at McFarlin Manor, 10 Wilson Street, 
Chelmsford, MA. The Annual Meeting of the Chelmsford 
Housing Authority Board of Commissioners is held on the 
first Tuesday in May. All meetings are open to the public. 

OFFICE HOURS 

Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. -4: 30 p.m. 



47 



CHELMSFORD HOUSING 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 
HIGH SCHOOL 



Mary E. Royce 

Executive Director 

Full -Time 



Helen Cantara 

Senior Clerk 

Full -Time 



Robert Trainor 

Maintenance Laborer 

Full-Time 



Serving the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, 
Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and Westford. 

DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Thomas Carey, Chairman 

J. James Howells, Vice-Chairman 

Ellen Hargraves, Secretary 

Howard Burns 

John Donohoe 

Stratos Dukakis 

Augustine Kish 

Irene Machemer 

Robert Manning 

Charlotte Scott 



Chelmsford 

Westford 

Groton 

Pepperell 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Littleton 

Townsend 

Shirley 

Westford 



ALTERNATES 



Linda Dalton 

Junior Clerk 

Part-Time 



Richard O'Neil 

Maintenance Laborer 

Part-Time 



AGENCY DIRECTORY 
Board of Commissioners 



NAME 

Ruth K. Delaney 
Robert L. Hughes 
William P. Keohane 
Pamela A. Turnbull 

Lynn Marcella 



Mary E. Royce 
Helen Cantara 
Linda H. Dalton 
Robert M. Trainor 
Richard P. O'Neil 



TITLE 


EXPIRES 


Chairman 


1990 


Vice-Chairman 


1993 


Treasurer 


1991 


Asst. Treasurer 


1993 


(State Appointee) 




Member 


1992 



STAFF 

Executive Director 
Senior Clerk 
Junior Clerk 
Mechanic Laborer 
Maintenance Laborer 



McFARLIN MANOR TENANT COUNCIL 



Mary L. Silva 
Eva R. Hull 
Grace E. Logan 
Evelyn B. Horton 
Alice M. O'Toole 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Asst. Treasurer 



Harvey Atkins, Jr. 
Kevin Finnegan 
Edward Mitchell 
L. Peter Noddin 
Jordan Waugh 
Ronald Wetmore 



Littleton 

Westford 

Townsend 

Shirley 

Groton 

Chelmsford 



ADMINISTRATION 



Bernholdt Nystrom 
Charles Valera 
David McLaughlin 
Paul Royte 
Paula Page 
Thomas Eng 



Superintendent-Director 

Assistant Director/ Principal 

Assistant Director/Vocational 

Guidance Director 

Special Education Coordinator 

Dean of Students 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School's enrollment as 
of October 1, 1988 was as follows: 

Chelmsford 134 

Groton 47 

Littleton 29 

Pepperell 73 

Shirley 51 

Townsend 56 

Westford 102 

Tuitioned 30 



Total 



522 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited by 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. 
and provides its students with on-the-job training, saleable 
skills, co-op program, high school diploma, trade cer- 
tificate and an opportunity for further education and job 
placement. 

Over the past decade, the record of employment for our 
graduates has averaged approximately 95%. Each year 
qualified seniors may elect to take advantage of our Co- 
op Training Program which allows senior students to work 
in industry during their shop weeks and receive valuable 
training in their chosen fields as well as a salary. 



The following programs are offered at Nashoba Tech: 



48 



Technical Programs 



Auto Body 

Automotive 

Carpentry 

Culinary Arts and Baking 

Data Processing 
Drafting 
Electrical 
Electronics 



Horticulture/ Landscaping 

Machine 

Medical Occupations 

Metal Fabrication 

and Welding 

Painting and Decorating 

Plumbing and Heating 

Printing 



Academic Programs 

English Geometry 

Social Studies Trigonometry 

U.S. History Advanced Mathematics 

Consumer Education Biology 

General Mathematics Physics 

Algebra Chemistry 

How to Start Your Own Business 

In addition to the technical and academic programs, 
a full Inter-Scholastic Athletic Program is offered to the 
students. 



wages, benefits, performance evaluations, job descriptions 
and organization changes. In addition, the Board makes 
the decisions concerning starting salaries, salary increases 
and job reclassifications; as well as participating with other 
personnel boards and exchanging current information. 

During the past years, the Board recommended and 
Town Meeting approved by law changes which now pro- 
vide additional benefits to employees under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Board that were already enjoyed by other town 
employees. Work was also completed on an extensive salary 
survey, the results of which will form the basis of by-law 
changes to be presented at the 1989 Town Meeting. 

In 1989, the Board will work closely with all town depart- 
ments to implement personnel practices in a way that is 
fair and equitable to town employees. The Board will also 
review existing personnel policies and procedures so that 
the town can continue to attract and maintain highly skill- 
ed and motivated employees. 



PLANNING BOARD 



ADULT EDUCATION 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult Educa- 
tion Program is open to anyone of high school age or over. 
Participants from all communities are welcome to par- 
ticipate in the many diversified courses which are offered 
during both the fall and spring semesters. This year 601 
students enrolled in our Adult Education Program. 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members 

Elizabeth L. Delaney, Chairman 
Joan M. Gauthier 
Harold I. Matzkin 

Clerk 

Louise Beauchesne 

Meetings 

The first Monday night of each month at the Town Of- 
fice Building. Special worksessions are scheduled when 
necessary. 

The Personnel Board is composed of three members, 
each have a term of office for two years. Two of whom are 
appointed by the Town Moderator, the third member of 
the Board is elected by the non-union town employees. Cur- 
rent members are Elizabeth Delaney (elected by non-union 
town employees) who replaced Pennryn Fitts (6/1983- 
6/1987); Joan M. Gauthier who replaced J. Rene Scutt 
(1/1981-1/1988) and Harold I. Matzkin who replaced Alan 
Murphy (1/1980-7/1988). Mr. Murphy had served as chair- 
man since July 1980. 

The purpose of the Board is to formulate and imple- 
ment policy regarding personnel administrative practices, 



John F McCarthy, Chairman 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr., Vice Chairman 

Kim J. MacKenzie, Clerk 

Eugene E. Gilet 

Christine A. Gleason 

James P. Good 

Ann H. McCarthy 

Principal Clerk, Joan L. Pare 

The Chelmsford Planning Board began the year by 
reorganizing the Board and appointed Mr. John F McCar- 
thy as Chairman, Mr. Thomas E. Firth, Jr. as Vice Chair- 
man, Mr. Kim MacKenzie as Clerk. Mr. Eugene Gilet is 
the representative to the Northern Middlesex Area Com- 
mission. In April, Mrs. Rosalind J. Boyle, who had served 
as a member on the Planning Board for nine years, did 
not return, her seat was filled by Ms. Christine A. Gleason. 

In 1988, (5) five Subdivisions were approved. They were 
located in the following areas: Badger Lane, McHugh Farm 
Lane, Sarah Lane, Nashoba Drive, Lewis Lane. 

Fifteen Site Plans were approved in 1988. 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Adams Library, Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Branch Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 

Library Trustees 

D. Lorraine Lambert, Chairperson 
Mark Gauthier, Vice-Chairperson 
Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 
Susan G. Cantin, Secretary 
Janet Hendl 
Brenda McDermott 



49 



Collections and Circulations: 1988 borrowing of 
materials showed an increase of over 10% for the second 
year in a row, with Children's House circulation rising over 
25% again! Continuous work on updating and tailoring 
the collection to our patrons is resulting in an improved 
selection of materials, and 3 new terminals have eased the 
wait for patrons checking out materials. 

Programs: The children's summer reading program at- 
tracted over 300 active participants, and adults were 
treated to "Laughing Matters" — a book discussion series 
created by library staff and funded by a humanities grant. 
Other programs at the main library or branch included 
a monthly mystery writers discussion group, lectures on 
subjects from archaeology to Zen, and a Chelmsford 
Writers' Roundtable. 

Personnel: Two new department heads in 1988 were 
Gloria Jacobs in Technical Services and Judy Hildebrandt 
in Reference. Roberta Haas has begun work in the Fine 
Arts area, and Dot Howard and Maureen O'Sullivan have 
joined the staff at MacKay. 

Facilities: The MacKay Branch Library received some 
much-needed attention in 1988 — carpeting, painting, some 
new furniture. Since the Library's building project was not 
exempted from the restrictions of Proposition 2 V£ in the 
November election, the plans for an expanded Adams 
Library are no longer feasible. 

Goals: 1989 should see continued attention to upgrading 
our collections, streamlining our technical processes and 



further progress towards on-line catalog access. We will 
continue our efforts to meet the challenge of providing 
quality library service in facilities without adequate space, 
seating, parking or handicapped access. Credit for our suc- 
cess in these efforts belongs to the Trustees, staff, and our 
supportive Friends and patrons. 

Statistical Report 



Monies deposited with Town Treasurer 

from fines, fees & lost materials 
Circulation: 273,627 
Staff: (full-time) 12 

(part-time) 11 (FTE's) 
pages 2.5 (FTE's) 

Departments: 

Children's: Cheryl Zani 
Circulation: Linda Robinson 
Community Services: Judy Buswick 
MacKay Branch: Rona Call 
Maintenance/custodial: John Reslow 
Reference: Judy Hildebrandt 
Technical Services: Gloria Jacobs 
Assistant Director: Sandy Yensen 



'18,695 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ellen Rauch 
Director 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 



Richard F. Burtt, Jr. 



Judith A. Olsson 
Chairman 



Janet F. Bonica 
(resigned 11/10/88) 



ENROLLED VOTERS 











TOTAL 


PRECINCT 


DEMOCRATIC 


REPUBLICAN 


UNENROLLED 


REGISTERED 


1 


650 


362 


1,026 


2,038 


2 


687 


403 


1,166 


2,256 


3 


551 


310 


1,101 


1,962 


4 


767 


343 


898 


2,008 


5 


683 


397 


1,234 


2,314 


6 


653 


428 


1,010 


2,091 


7 


673 


457 


1,223 


2,353 


8 


670 


376 


1,044 


2,090 


9 


600 


440 


1,140 


2,180 


TOTALS 


5,934 


3,516 


9,842 


19,292 



50 



CHELMSFORD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Carl Olsson, Chairman 
Samuel Poulten, Vice Chairman 
Carol Merriam, Secretary 

Jill MacPhee, Student Member 



Barbara Ward 
Wendy Marcks 



51 



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT FOR 1988 

The pressures on the Chelmsford School Department 
continued during 1988 resulting from the economic con- 
straints imposed by Proposition 2 V2 > declining enrollment 
at the secondary level, the beginnings of increase in enroll- 
ment at the elementary level and the desire to provide 
quality education. The quality of service continued steadily 
upward. It is our intention to continue on that course. 

Our purpose in the Chelmsford School System is to con- 
tinue a Quest for Quality in order to challenge the intellec- 
tual skills of every student. Our goals are to provide ap- 
propriate educational facilities and curriculum for all of 
the students and to recognize the uniqueness of each in- 
dividual. Thus, in a Quest for Quality we recognize four 
major educational areas that require study and attention; 
curriculum and control of courses, quality and effectiveness 
of teaching; recognition and encouragement of students; 
and development of intellectual leadership. 

The staff has been involved in ongoing studies in order 
to find the best means for meeting the individual needs 
of children. This requires a high level of organization and 
cooperation between the grade level and varying disciplines. 
Ways to challenge the very bright child, keep the average 
child working to capacity, and providing additional time 
for the slow learner are being investigated and several pro- 
grams have been piloted. 

New technology and the explosion in knowledge has 
brought and will continue to bring, significant changes in 
the curriculum. The innovations that have been brought 
forth from our computer department and Cable TV, are 
providing significant assistance in the learning process. 

The School Committee spent a great deal of time and 
effort in trying to deal with the issues affecting the budget, 
such as increased costs and negotiated salaries. The failure 
of the town to vote an override in Proposition 2 V£ prompted 
the School Committee to realize that the time is fast ap- 
proaching when the Chelmsford School System will no 
longer be able to offer these extensive services it has pro- 
vided in the past, and must seek ways of containing the 
cost of education to that which the community is willing 
and able to pay. While the School Committee's commit- 
ment is to provide quality and excellence in education for 
all pupils attending Chelmsford Schools, it is also commit- 
ted to operating within extant financial constraints required 
for the preparation of a fiscally responsible budget. 

During this school year there have been many educa- 
tional highlights of which we are all very proud. The 
Chelmford Public Schools believe that it has the respon- 
sibility of meeting individual students' needs and of 
simultaneously being sensitive and responsive to the needs 
of our community. Our staff is committed to this goal, and 
as a result, our children are the beneficiaries. 

The following reports written by school personnel will 
provide you with a sampling of the accomplishments of our 
young people as well as a better understanding of the lear- 
ning environment and practical experiences present in our 
schools today. 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 

The academic year 1987-1988 was fruitful and produc- 
tive at Chelmsford High School. We participated in many 
academic programs at the local, state, national and inter- 
national level and our students grew intellectually and 
socially. Specifically, our students took part in many assess- 
ment tests which were reported out with local, regional, 
state and national norms. This provided us with a number 
of opportunities to compare our standards with criteria set 
by the State Department of Education and the national 
guidelines set forth in Madison High School by the 
Secretary of Education. We are happy to report to the 
citizens of Chelmsford that we are pleased with the 
outcome. 

Many students achieved individual honors and met their 
goals as reflected by their accomplishments. The same is 
true of our professional staff as members were selected as 
recipients of National Science Foundation Grants; our 
science department was honored by the E.I. Dupont de 
Nemours Company to participate in its summer workshop; 
two of our teachers were leaders at the National Council 
of Teachers of English Conference which was held in St. 
Louis, Missouri and three of our teachers at the High 
School authored books which were published this past year. 

From the standpoint of activities, our students were ac- 
tively involved in the fine arts by producing numerous 
plays, publications, exhibits, performances, international 
exchanges, and several community projects. Our orchestra 
traveled and performed throughout Western Europe. It 
is estimated that approximately one-third of our student 
body was actively involved in an extra-curricular activity 
which helped expand their academic horizons. 

Our athletic program was successful during this 
academic year as we once again captured our division's 
Ernest Dalton Memorial Trophy for the greatest percen- 
tage of victories in interscholastic competeition for the en- 
tire academic year. This was indeed a rewarding fete; 
however, the greatest achievement of our athletes was the 
manner in which they represented themselves, our school, 
their homes and the community. Approximately forty per- 
cent of our student body participates in our athletic pro- 
gram and their behavior, performance, demeanor, and 
sportsmanship was exemplary and our athletes are the en- 
vy of the entire Merrimack Valley. 

This was the year of declining enrollment and conse- 
quently our school has been reduced to three Houses. We 
have also altered our schedule to a traditional seven period 
day. The students and staff have adjusted to this transi- 
tion with ease. All of the programs both academic and 
extra-curricular continue to be offered, and the high stan- 
dards and expectations are being maintained. 

It is with a deep sense of pride that I submit this report 
to the Town of Chelmsford on its High School. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George J. Betses 
Principal 



52 



CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 
SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT 

The 1987-1988 school year was indeed a busy one for 
the Social Studies Department. To help create the 200th 
anniversary of the United States Constitution, a "Constitu- 
tion Day" was held and later students participated in a 
"Constitutional Convention" at the Lowell Memorial 
Auditorium. The "Constitution Day" featured a day of 
presentations by community members representing the 
topics of immigration, military service, volunteer organiza- 
tions and local, county and state government. The Lowell 
"Constitution Convention" was sponsored by the National 
Park Service and involved area high schools in debates on 
topics such as English as the national language, mandatory 
drug testing, rating of recorded music, and prayer in the 
public schools. 

The department continued to offer quality programs for 
all ability levels in political science, world history, United 
States history and a variety of elective courses in areas such 
as sociology, psychology, international relations, Asian 
studies, economics and the holocaust. 

Due to a dedicated and involved staff, students par- 
ticipated in the following special events: The Chelmsford 
Education Foundation News Quiz, The Harvard Model 
UN, The Bentley Model UN, The Framingham State Essay 
Contest, and Chelmsford Student Government Day. 

As in the past, field trips to historical landmarks such 
as The Boston Public Library, The State House, and 
Fruitlands Museum were integrated into the curriculum 
as were visits by numerous guest speakers from the Boston 
Vietnam Veterans Center, The Boston World Affairs 
Council and The Lowell Park Service, among others. 

The department is committed to continue to provide a 
full, varied curriculum that incudes a variety of oppor- 
tunities for students to use and test concepts learned in 
classroom activities. 



the national standardized test. The highest scores on this 
test were achieved on the written essay. Our ninth grade 
students placed first in the state and fifth in the nation 
on the National Language Arts Olympiad, a standardiz- 
ed test that measures vocabulary, reading comprehension, 
grammar and spelling skills. Sophomore Dan Tepfer and 
freshman Keith Patton won cash prizes in the Umass Ex- 
cellence in Expository Writing Program. The high school 
literary magazine, Mosaics, and the student newsmagazine, 
The Voice, were awarded a first place from Columbia 
University Press Association. Our students are performing 
successfully on the verbal SAT and, after graduation, at 
college and on the job. 

Our strong commitment to writing received additional 
support both technically and financially. With the addi- 
tion of six Apple computers, the English Department has 
established a writing laboratory with nine word processors 
for students to use in both our writing electives and regular 
English courses. If staffing permits, we hope to open this 
lab to students during their open scheduled periods for 
writing and SAT tutorials. In addition, Mr. Ed Krasnecki, 
owner of the Newsweekly, has generously offered our 
students in journalism a full page of his newspaper to gain 
a realistic experience in producing copy for print. 

Achievements have not been limited to the students. The 
faculty of the English Department has also received 
recognition during this past academic year. Dr. Polly 
Cleary's name was included on a list of notable American 
poets. Rebecca Carosso Burnett, on sabattical from our 
staff, with Liz Foster of our staff, have written a writing 
text to be used with the teaching of Shakespeare that was 
recommended with praise by the National Council Teachers 
of English. Stephen Meidell, chairperson of the depart- 
ment, was selected to conduct an administrative Horace 
Mann Grant to study the curricula of schools with a higher 
number of National Merit Scholars. The greatest achieve- 
ment of our faculty is their continued efforts with all our 
students each academic day, an achievement that is reward- 
ed by the students' academic and personal development. 



W. Allen Thomas, Jr. 
Social Studies 
Department Head 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT HEAD 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The High School English Department continues to 
witness the success of our present and former students in 
the area of language arts. Through the expertise of our 
professional staff and the continued support of the ad- 
ministration, the students are exposed to a curriculum that 
prepares them for the challenges of the future while en- 
couraging them to realize their full potential as a person. 

During the academic year of 1987-1988, our students con- 
tinued to demonstrate an exceptional level of achievement. 
Twenty- three of our twenty-six senior English Advanced 
Placement students qualified for college English credit on 



Since last town meeting we have lost two excellent science 
teachers in Dorothy Gillispie and Fred Leger. Both were 
casualties of the RIFing process. We wish them well and 
thank them for their years of service and dedication. 

Our TV link with the University of Lowell is still going 
strong. We have expanded the program to include mass 
spectroscopy and emission spectroscopy. We are now plan- 
ning programs for the determination of the speed of light 
and X-ray diffraction. In April, Mr. Donald Parkhurst and 
myself will be presenting a paper at the National Science 
Teachers Association convention. The topic will pertain 
to the use of two way TV in science education. 

Mr. Ralph Sherwood and Mrs. Cheryl Mamalis have 
presented a safety workshop for the entire secondary science 
staff. They have accepted the responsibility for educating 



53 



the staff in the area of laboratory safety and safety regula- 
tions. We are indeed fortunate to have such dedicated staff. 
The workshop was the culmination of a Horace-Mann 
Grant awarded to Mr. Sherwood and Mrs. Mamalis. 

Mr. Sherwood is also participating in an in-service pro- 
gram in the field of chemical education. The program is 
sponsored by the National Science Foundation and hosted 
by the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Mr. Sherwood 
has already devised an original laboratory exercise pertain- 
ing to the concentration of chloride ions in household 
water. 

A Horace-Mann Grant was also awarded to Mr. Ber- 
nard Queenan, Mr. Richard Luce, Mr. Michael Winn and 
Mr. John Prescott for integrating a new text into the level 
II biology program. Mr. Prescott also participated in a 
summer workshop sponsored by the Dupont Co. He spent 
a week in Wilmington, Delaware, with the best secondary 
biology teachers in the country getting updated in the new 
techniques in biological research. 

As a direct result of Mr. Prescott's efforts we arranged 
for an expert in the field of electrophoresis to come to the 
high school to conduct a laboratory exercise in this im- 
portant research field. The Dupont plant in Billerica was 
the source of the materials and expertise. 

Due to the recent reduction in forces, many of the staff 
have had to teach in areas that they never have before. 
I would like to thank Mr. Wayne Hamilton, Mrs. Cheryl 
Mamalis, Mrs. Christine Raymond, Mr. Donald Parkhurst, 
and Mr. Ralph Sherwood for their dedication to the educa- 
tion of the students of the Town of Chelmsfored. 

Submitted by, 
Mike Tate 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 7-12 

January to June 1988 proved to be a very successful con- 
clusion to a successful beginning of the Industrial Arts pro- 
gram in grades 7-8 and 9-12. 

Students at the McCarthy Middle School enjoyed the 
designing and construction of a race car and the design 
and construction of a dream house. Home design and 
repair were added to the curriculum in the 8th grade 
course and will be evaluated in June of '89 for revision or 
continuation in the 8th grade program. 

Grades 9-12 saw a reduction in the number of staff for 
the Industrial Arts program at the end of the school year. 
In June, Mr. Robert Pariseau, the department head for 
Industrial Arts, left, due to declining enrollment at the 
high school, to take a position in New Hampshire as Direc- 
tor of Vocational Education at one of the local school 
districts. Best of luck to Bob. 

Effective September of '88, the name of the department 
for Industrial Arts has been changed to the Department 
for Technology Education. 



As the new department head of a newly-named depart- 
ment, I am working to change the philosophy and objec- 
tives of the department as well as its name. We are going 
to strive to be a hands on problem solving branch of the 
educational community at C.H.S. 

In the electronics classes, the purchase of a new piece 
of equipment is bringing us toward that goal. This com- 
puter can be "bugged" by the instructor, Mr. DiNatale, 
and students can work on the system to repair and replace 
the parts necessary. Work on Hero, our robot, continues, 
and discussion has taken place with the U. Lowell Robotics 
Dept. on the subject of program and control of the robot 
via television linkage. 

In Mr. Finnerty's technical drawing and architectural 
drawing classes, work is continuing to expand the CAD 
(Computer Aided Drafting/ Design) system and we are cur- 
rently having discussion with the community industries to 
fulfill this need. 

Courses offered in the Technology Education Depart- 
ment include: 



General Drafting 
Architectural Drawing 
Digital Electronics 
Fine Furniture Construction 
General Welding 



Technical Drawing 
Analog Electronics 
T.E. Exploratory 
House Construction 
Small Engine Repair 



It is my hope that parents will research these courses and 
encourage their daughters and sons to sign up and take 
a few of these courses while at C.H.S. 

Submitted by, 
Barry T. Bell 
Department Head for 
Technology Education 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF BUSINESS EDUCATION 

The Business Department presently has six staff 
members with expertise in a wide range of Business and 
Distributive Education subject areas. In addition to the six 
staff members, the Department has a Business Resource 
Specialist for the Business Resource classroom. Monies for 
the position of Resource Specialist were granted to 
Chelmsford by the Federal Government as a result of ef- 
forts of Business Department staff members in developing 
the grant proposal. 

This past April four Distributive Education students 
competed in national competition in Salt Lake City. Three 
of these students received recognition for finishing in the 
top ten nationwide. 

Last spring the Fashion Merchandising Classes in con- 
junction with several local retailers coordinated and spon- 
sored a highly successful Spring and Summer Fashion Show 
entitled Fashions in Bloom. The proceeds from the class 
project were used to provide scholarship money to students 
pursuing careers in fashion and/or business. 



54 



The Business Department continues to work with the 
Career Education Center in coordinating speakers from 
the Business Community to share their expertise and in- 
sights with the students. 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL 
MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics Department 
continues to meet the needs of every student; a task that 
becomes increasingly difficult to accomplish due to reduc- 
tion in force because of fiscal constraints. 

This year, an in-depth study initiated by Ann Swierz- 
bin, a member of our staff, led to a recommendation to 
eliminate the two year Albegra One sequence for low 
achievers and replace it with a more traditional one year 
Pre-Algebra course. Successful completion of this course 
would allow a student to elect a traditional Algebra One 
course. 

After months of intensive search, the Geometry Text- 
book Review Committee recommended the adoption of 
Merrill Geometry for use in the level two Geometry course. 
It will replace a textbook that is sixteen years old. 

The Calculus Textbook Review Committee is still in the 
process of searching for an adequate replacement text for 
use in the level two Calculus course. 

Due to decline in enrollment and budgetary constraints, 
the Basic II semester course has been dropped from the 
program of studies and it appears that 1987-1988 was the 
final year that Computer Programming (AP) and level 
three Calculus will be allowed to run. The Mathematics 
staff at Chelmsford High School was reduced by six sec- 
tions (1.2 teachers). Fortunately, due to leaves of absence 
and other staff transfers, no layoffs were necessary. 

Our students continue to improve their scores in the 
Mathematics section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test. As 
usual, our students performed extremely well in the Ad- 
vanced Placement Exams (Calculus AB, BC and Computer 
Science). The Math League team continued to perform 
well in all of their competitions. 

The Town of Chelmsford remains fortunate to possess 
a motivated, qualified, dedicated and diversified 
mathematics teaching staff and an excellent mathematics 
curriculum. However, further large reductions could cause 
more courses to be eliminated from the program of studies. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION K-12 

Three fundamental themes — communication, cur- 
riculum, and educational networking — were goals of the 
Physical Education Department over the past year. 



Presently all schools have a Physical Education Hand- 
book which was distributed to parents either as a report 
card insert or as an open house handout. The elementary 
handbook is the most current and most extensive. 
Modifications and additions will be made to the middle 
school and high school handbooks during the coming year. 

Several experimental ideas were initiated at Byam last 
year with the intent of expanding the concepts to the other 
elementary schools — a Physical Education Newsletter con- 
taining information for parents as well as students, a com- 
puterized Physical Education report card insert, an invita- 
tion to parents to attend their child's Physical Education 
class, and a monthly sportsmanship award program. 
Several of these programs are currently being phased into 
other elementary schools. 

A revised Fitnessgram program (computerized fitness 
report card/exercise prescription) was used in all the 
school's health fitness testing programs last spring. The new 
system compared students to health standards in each of 
the areas tested — cardiovascular endurance, body composi- 
tion, muscular strength and endurance, lower back flex- 
ibility, and upper body strength. The vast majority of 
students scored at or above the health standard in all tests. 
Two test components that indicated borderline scores were 
cardiovascular strength/endurance and upper body 
strength. The information compiled from the town wide 
fitness testing was used for program evaluation and 
published in the Physical Education Newsletters and Hand- 
books. Students in grades 4,5, and 7 received individualiz- 
ed Fitnessgrams. 

With the use of a scorecard scanning devise, we hope 
to include more grade levels in the Fitnessgram report card 
system. The scanner will read scores directly from card to 
disk from which the reports will be generated. 

At the elementary level we are currently experimenting 
with the education and communication capabilities of the 
camcorder/VCR in order to enhance the curriculum and 
public relations. Additionally, we are working on the 
development of a series of theme related lessons. 

The middle school expanded the Project Adventure 
ropes course which is now a core offering in the curriculum. 
The successful Walking Wellness program at Parker spur- 
red interest in the development of walking electives at both 
McCarthy and CHS. An alternative to tennis, the high 
school will offer floor tennis/pickle ball in the curriculum 
this spring. Hopefully, needed repairs will be made to the 
high school tennis courts so that we can offer this worth- 
while lifetime activity to our students again. 

As President of the Northeast Physical Education Direc- 
tors, I arranged three regional workshops which various 
staff members attended. The topic of the first workshop 
was "Maximizing Activity Time In Elementary Physical 
Education" presented by Dr. Robert Fredericks of 
Bridgewater State College. The second workshop was en- 
titled "Middle School Curriculum — Theory To Practice" 
conducted by Dr. Gretchen Brockmeyer of Springfield Col- 
lege. The third workshop focused on two topics — a com- 



55 



prehensive 9-12 health curriculum and skills grouping in 
high school Physical Education. 

The workshops not only provided us with information 
to improve our curriculum, but also provided us with an 
educational network of directors and teachers with whom 
we can continue to share ideas. 

As next year's President of CTAPE (City and Town Ad- 
ministrators of Physical Education), I hope to expand the 
educational network statewide. 

The Physical Education Department ran three 
workshops on November 8th. One workshop focused on 
the elementary curriculum. Another workshop explored 
computer application for the Physical Education teacher. 
One such project completed over the summer was the com- 
puterization of the high school locker rooms. The third 
workshop entitled "Games To Grow On" was conducted 
by Karl Rohnke, founder of Project Adventure and author 
of three new games books. 

Plans for future workshops include the topics of walk- 
ing wellness and strategies for coed Physical Education 
classes. 



FROM THE 
DEPARTMENT HEAD OF ART 

Although the means for maintaining and improving cur- 
riculum development and teacher performance have been 
severely eroded, due to budget cutbacks in recent years, 
members of the Art Department have begun taking some 
initiatives on their own: 

•Barbara Nowacki has continued working with Boston 

University in the supervision of student art teachers 

at the South Row School. 

•Dora Bungard has completed her Masters degree in 

secondary education through Fitchburg State College. 

As Department Head of Art (K-12), listed below are 
some of my accomplishments for 1988: 

•Elected Steering Committee Chairman for first annual 
Massachusetts Art A 11- State Festival. Three students 
from Chelmsford High School were selected to 
participate. 

•Elected Vice President of The Massachusetts Direc- 
tors of Art Education for 1988-89. 

•Co-initiated, developed and acquired grant-funding 
for Multi- Disciplinary Arts Technology Extended 
Event at the high school. (An eight-day Arts 
Technology project involving students in Physics, 
Computer Programming, Art and Music classes, spon- 
sored by the Massachusetts Cultural Education Col- 
laborative and the Masssachusetts Arts Lottery.) 

•Initiated, developed and acquired grant-funding for 
Computer Desktop Publishing & Multi-Media Presen- 
tations Project at the high school. (This project pro- 
vides publishing and presentation services to all depart- 
ments' and administration and staff at the high school 



and was sponsored by the Chelmsford High School Im- 
provement Council.) 

•Co-initiated and scheduled visitation of high school 
art department by six professional artists from the 
Guangzhou Fine Arts Academy, in Guangdong Pro- 
vince, Peoples Republic of China. 

•Coordinated and acquired grant-funding for Artist- 
in-Residence Studio Sculpture Project at McCarthy 
Middle School. (A three-day project for sixth, seventh 
and eighth grade students, sponsored by the McCar- 
thy School Improvement Council.) 

•Completed Master's Program in Educational Tech- 
nology through Fitchburg State College and the Mer- 
rimack Education Center (The Role of Arts 
Technology in Education). 

•Supervised student teacher (Masters in Art Education) 
from the University of Lowell. 

Several items of note for the 1988-89 school year: 

•Although the high school has continued to lose art staff 
(50% in the last two years), thirty-four seniors have 
enrolled in the Advanced Placement Art Portfolio 
Class (twice as many as ever before). 

•The Art and Music Departments have collaborated to 
implement the Elementary Computer Project, which 
utilizes the new "Arts Technologies" to encourage 
teachers to use computers as an educational produc- 
tivity tool. 

•The high school Art and Social Studies Departments 
have collaborated to acquire grants from the Massa- 
chusetts Arts Lottery and the First Foundation to pro- 
vide and develop an American Art History slide lec- 
ture series for U.S. History and Art Portfolio students. 
This year's lecturer was former high school art teacher, 
Paula Brown. 

•Byam School art teacher, Dora Bungard, assisted in 
producing an outstanding student-made school 
calendar. 

•Senior, Amy Buntel, represented her high school in 
winning the Boston Globe Scholarship in the Scholastic 
Art Awards Competition. This is the first time a 
C.H.S. student has been so honored. 



Scholastic Art 












Awards Results: 


1985 


1986 


1987 


1988 


1989 


• Participating students 


40 


55 


60 


35 


33 


• Total entries 


101 


126 


167 


81 


133 


• Portfolios submitted 


6 


9 


16 


6 


13 


• Portfolios selected 


— 


— 


2 


— 


1 


• Honorable mentions 


5 


6 


4 


2 


9 


• Gold Keys 


6 


11 


15 


9 


12 


• Blue Ribbons 


4 


8 


6 


5 


? 


• Gold Medals 


— 


1 


— 


— 


? 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

The Music Department strives to assist students in 
discovering and developing their musical talents for bet- 
ter understanding and enjoyment of a wide variety of 
musical styles. 



56 



The Harrington School has two part-time music 
specialists, the Westlands three part-time music specialists. 
All other elementary schools have one music specialist each, 
who is responsible for all music education in the building, 
except for instruction on band and orchestral instruments. 
Each elementary school has weekly lessons in music with 
a multi-level performing choral group of approximately 
115 students. These schools have recorder concerts, and 
the use of ORFF instruments in both classroom instruc- 
tion and public performances. Some schools also have 
guitar clubs. 

General music at the McCarthy is given to all sixth, 
seventh and eighth grade students. General music in these 
grades is basically designed for non- performing students: 
for many it is their last formal contact with music educa- 
tion. All McCarthy students have the opportunity to join 
one of the performing choral groups which number ap- 
proximately 200 students. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an experience 
not found in other areas within the Music Department. 
Instruction in playing orchestral string instruments is of- 
fered starting in grade three, and in all band and orchestral 
instruments from grades four through twelve. Each par- 
ticipating student is offered one small group lesson each 
week. In addition there is the opportunity to participate 
in small group and larger ensembles during and after 
school. The "elementary select orchestra" is made up of 
the more advanced orchestra students from four of our 
elementary schools. They rehearse after school on 
Thursdays. There are approximately 800 students par- 
ticipating in our instrumental music program, grade three 
through twelve while the choral program totals approx- 
imately 900 students. 

Instrumental and choral ensembles perform in school 
and community concerts and programs throughout the 
school year. McCarthy and High School have the oppor- 
tunity to audition for the M.M.E.A Northeastern Jr. and 
Senior District concerts as well as the all -state concert. 
Several of our secondary school music groups will perform 
for the A. CD. A. and M.I.C.A. competitions. This year 
our high school music students are planning a Canadian 
concert festival in May. Some of our community concerts 
include: McCarthy Elderly Luncheon, "Down-Town Cross- 
ing" Boston and tours of local nursing homes. Our high 
school Music Department will present its annual Broad- 
way musical this May. The Music Department will hold 
its annual band and choral festivals this March while the 
orchestra festival is scheduled for May. 

The Chelmsford Friends of Music, a parental support 
group, has continued to show their support to the total 
Music Department. They are responsible for the after 
school private lesson program. Furthermore, their scholar- 
ship program includes: private lesson grants, summer 
music camp and college scholarships. 

Our plans for the future are to continue to update and 
coordinate the music curriculum with increased sensitivi- 
ty of modern technology in the field while also keeping with 
traditional music teaching. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Enrollment in foreign language courses continued to be 
quite stable. Approximately 63 percent of CHS students 
studied as foreign language this year, while at McCarthy, 
enrollment in the 7th and 8th grades was about 53 percent. 

At McCarthy, German was not offered, either as a year 
course or as part of the Exploratory/ Reading course. This 
change was made to reflect the elimination of German 
from the high school curriculum. We were sorry to end 
the German program, but fluctuating and often small 
enrollments over several years, especially at CHS, led to 
the decision. In the Exploratory course, Italian replaced 
German as the third language offered during each 
semester, along with French and Spanish. For the third 
consecutive year, French students participated in a four- 
day excursion to Quebec in April. 

At CHS, although German was dropped, we did see suf- 
ficient increase in the Italian I enrollment to warrant ad- 
ding an additional section. All levels of the other 
languages, including Advanced Placement Spanish and 
French, were also offered. The extra-curricular activities 
associated with the language department were all active, 
and exchange groups again went to Tarquinia, Italy; Nan- 
cy, France; and Huelva, Spain. 

Through a mini-grant provided by the Chelmsford 
Education Foundation, French teachers were able to ac- 
cess the telecommunications network in France called 
Minitel. This service provided authentic material which 
was used to develop a varity of lessons for the French 
classes. Telecommunications, both internationally and 
locally, is a valuable teaching resource which we would like 
to further explore in the coming years. 



FROM THE HOME ECONOMICS 
DEPARTMENT HEAD 

The curriculum of the Home Economics Department 
is constantly updated to meet the needs of the students in 
grades 7 through 12 in the skills of daily living. 

The Junior High school program is mandatory for both 
boys and girls and introduces the basics of foods, con- 
sumerism, sewing and decision making. Electives at the 
High School level include Home Economics I, Chefs 
courses and Independent Living. In conjunction with Com- 
munity Education, the pre-school at the High School pro- 
vides a laboratory for the Child Development/parenting 
classes. Education in quality child care and parenting pro- 
vides training for students who may be future day care 
workers and promotes positive parenting skills for families 
in the future. 

The Home Economics Department is working on a five 
year plan involving the state, the community and the school 
to provide skills needed for jobs currently available in the 
local area. 



57 



The Home Economics teachers attend workshops and 
conferences in an effort to keep abreast of the rapidly 
changing technology in our profession. Three of the Home 
Economics teachers earned their Master's degree in secon- 
dary education in 1988. Unfortunately, two of these 
teachers are no longer in the system due to reduction in 
force. 



from the principal of 
the McCarthy middle school 

The McCarthy School currently has an enrollment of 
approximately 1,150 students in grades six, seven and 
eight. The teaming approach for instruction is employed 
at the sixth grade level with four teams of approximately 
100 students each. Students in grades seven and eight are 
departmentalized. 

The academic program at McCarthy continues to pro- 
vide the highest quality of instruction for students of all 
ability levels. The addition this year of a special projects 
instructor has expanded the use of our computer lab to 
100% utilization. 

Several noteworthy achievements have been accomplish- 
ed by our students and faculty. In the fall of 1988 Mrs. 
Judith White of our mathematics department received the 
prestigious President's Award for Excellence in teaching 
math. Only 49 other teachers were so honored nationwide. 

McCarthy students participated successfully in several 
academic competitions including the Odyssey of the Mind 
and Knowledge Master programs. Our students were 
awarded the state championship in the Knowledge Masters 
program. This year we are pleased to host the New England 
Region Odyssey of the Mind competition in March 1989. 
Twenty-eight towns will be represented by 71 teams and 
497 students. 

The McCarthy School continues to offer a wide range 
of extra curricular activities for our students. Activities 
range from the physical to academic. A busy intramural 
program exists as well as student council activities, chess 
club, wrestling team, science club, homemakers club, 
Odyssey of the Mind teams, and many more. 

The McCarthy Middle School has an active and involv- 
ed P.T.O. Our P.T.O. has conducted several fund rais- 
ing activities such as parent dances, roller skating events 
and book fairs. Funds raised from these activities are used 
to support school assemblies and programs such as Child 
Abuse Prevention Programs, media and theater presenta- 
tions and a staff appreciation breakfast. We very much 
value the interest, input and support of our parent's 
organizations. 

FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF SOCIAL STUDIES, GRADES 6-8 

This year, as in others, the Social Studies Department 
conducted a mock presidential election to coincide with 



the actual election that took place on November 8th. All 
students were taught the elective process as well as the 
duties and responsibilities of our legislative and executive 
leaders. Posters were designed: debates, discussions, and 
speeches were made in all classes. Since all students had 
preregistered for our school election, each youngster voted 
by precinct and used actual ballots provided by Mary 
St.Hilaire, our Town Clerk. 

Protect 300, spearheaded by Mr. Dulski of our Social 
Studies Department, was again a success. All students took 
part in a National Geography Bee in January. Students 
from grades 6-7-8 entered the National History Day Con- 
test. The history honors program is in its second year. There 
is ongoing study this year in order to make a recommen- 
dation for an honors class in the seventh grade. A conscious 
effort is going on to educate students about holidays, and 
to celebrate them in an appropriate manner i.e. Martin 
Luther King Day. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF SCIENCE, GRADES 6-8 

The major goal of the science curricula, grades six 
through eight, is to develop in the students the skills of 
scientific investigation which involves not only measurement 
and laboratory techniques but also problem -solving situa- 
tions. To accomplish this goal, the science teachers employ 
a variety of techniques which involve notetaking along with 
the keeping of a notebook, audio-visuals, oral exercises, 
laboratory activities and homework. These techniques are 
used to develop organizational, listening, thinking and 
research skills. The sixth grade content involves units in 
the life, earth and physical sciences as well as health, while 
the seventh grade curriculum stresses the life sciences and 
the eighth grade program involves geology, astronomy, 
meterology and oceanography. 

The science staff has been active this year with 1) 
workshops in science laboratory safety and the "Rights To 
Know Law;" 2) the testing of new technology for the 
classroom, particularly in the areas of computers and TV. 
microscopy; and 3) curricular activities, such as revisions 
in course outlines, development of lab activities and 
previewing of new materials. As a result of these activities, 
the science department has purchased a microscopy set- 
up and is involved with the University of Lowell, as well 
as schools in Dracut and Germany, in a telecommunica- 
tion program. 

The 1988-89 school year should prove to be a busy one 
since, along with the regular classwork, teachers will be 
1) developing programs for the microscopy set-up; 2) con- 
tinuing to develop the telecommunication program; and 
3) previewing textbooks for replacement of outdated edi- 
tions. In addition, science safety will continue to be a ma- 
jor emphasis particularly in view of the increased class sizes. 



58 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR ENGLISH, GRADES 6-8 

McCarthy's English Department began the year with an 
assembly to celebrate Edgar Allan Poe's birthday. Poe 
himself (Mel Harold) was present to read excerpts from 
his works and to share highlights of his life. In prepara- 
tion for the assembly, students had read works Poe was 
to perform. Following the program, some classes wrote 
reviews of the presentation while others wrote letters to Mr. 
Poe himself; other classes wrote parodies of various Poe 
works. 

In the course of the year, many faculty members attend- 
ed workshops in various curriculum areas to maintain skills 
and to explore nuances of change in the language arts area. 
In addition, the department head presented several 
workshops in the Merrimack Valley area sharing an oral 
history project created in conjunction with Sunny Acres 
Nursing Home and focusing on the cooperative efforts bet- 
ween seventh graders and senior citizens. 

The eighth grade honors program completed its first full 
year. The program's emphasis is on reading and writing. 
Using the Junior Great Books approach, youngsters read 
and analyzed the works of classic short story authors and 
used their reading as the source for much of the composi- 
tion. One highlight was an interdisciplinary project with 
the math department; students learned to quantify and 
plot authors' writing styles. Having plotted the masters' 
styles, students could then plot their own to find out which 
author's style theirs most resembled. In addition, 
youngsters in the class also had a chance to meet and to 
interview a local author about his writing. 

Relative to materials being used, the department has ex- 
plored a number of new options. Teachers are currently 
evaluating a new vocabulary program for top level 
students. Also, a number of grammar series are being 
piloted at grade 6 as staff faces the need to update texts 
at that level. Too, eighth grade staff will be evaluating new 
literature texts to replace out-of-print, worn-out materials 
currently in inventory. In September a 1988 copyright 
replaced the eight-year-old spelling series that had been 
in use. Finally, thanks to a grant through the Boston 
Herald, newspapers are being provided to supplement the 
curriculum in many language arts classes. 

Many of our youngsters received outstanding recogni- 
tion for their writing efforts. Last spring McCarthy students 
placed both second and third in an essay contest sponsored 
by the Elder Services of the Merrimack; several youngsters 
also received honorable mention in that contest. This fall 
McCarthy students placed first and second in the children's 
class in the Lowell Sun Essay Contest; two eighth graders 
received honorable mentions in the youth category too. In 
addition, many youngsters from all grades in the building, 
have been published in several national publications which 
feature the works of gifted student writers. The depart- 
ment is also proud of Mrs. Thurlow's efforts in establishing 
a literary magazine; McCarthy's monthly publication con- 
tinues to grow in quality and size. 



The English Department is also looking to becoming 
more involved in the use of the computer lab. Classes are 
scheduled in the lab as are individual youngsters who wish 
to work on various projects. As more and more programs 
and equipment become available, increased use will be 
made for remediation, enrichment, and elementary word 
processing. In addition, many faculty members have been 
using the lab's facilities to create materials for use with 
classes. 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
OF MATHEMATICS, GRADES 6-8 

McCarthy Middle School and Massachusetts were well 
represented in November by Judith White, this state's reci- 
pient of the prestigious Presidential Award for Excellence 
in Mathematics Teaching. The award program is ad- 
ministered for the White House by the National Science 
Foundation and aims to identify and honor outstanding 
secondary teachers. A $7,500 National Science Founda- 
tion grant to be spent under Mrs. White's direction over 
a two-year period will be used to enhance mathematics in- 
struction at McCarthy. 

The mathematics faculty remains active in local, state, 
and national professional organizations. Staff members 
participated in workshops at the fall meeting of the 
Association of Teachers of Mathematics in Massachusetts 
held at Lesley College. At the Northeastern Regional Con- 
ference of the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics, teachers attended workshops, heard speakers 
of national prominence, and examined new teaching 
materials and texts at commercial exhibits. Also in the fall, 
Marsha Kelly was a member of an accreditation team from 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges that 
completed an extensive four day evaluation of the Burn- 
coat Middle School in Worcester. 

McCarthy's computer lab has continued to grow. Both 
equipment and software have been updated. The lab 
facilities have been utilized by students of all grade levels 
for a variety of curriculum related activities. Sixth grade 
students have a scheduled period weekly; seventh and 
eighth grade students are scheduled by a subject teacher. 
This year, for the first time, there is a full time staff 
member in the lab. Parents have continued to provide in- 
valuable assistance as lab aides. 

Members of the math department strive not only to meet 
the needs of all students but also to challenge each in- 
dividual to fulfill his or her potential. To better achieve 
this goal, advanced courses in algebra and geometry are 
offered and seventy- five students are currently participating 
in these accelerated programs. A student's inclusion in the 
program is based on standardized test scores, teachers' 
recommendations, and aptitude test results. 

A document entitled Curriculum and Evaluation Stan- 
dards for School Mathematics will soon be released by the 






59 



National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. The up- 
dated standards will call for expanding the range of 
mathematical topics to be studied at middle school level, 
for increasing the role of the calculator and computer in 
the classroom, and for emphasizing the learning of mathe- 
matics in a problem solving environment. Department 
members will be reviewing this document and adjusting 
the present curriculum, if necessary, to incorporate the new 
guidelines regarding curriculum content and teaching 
methodology. 



FROM THE DIRECTORS OF 
HUMANITIES AND SCIENCE 

The Director of Humanities is responsible for the follow- 
ing areas: kindergarten through grade twelve; language 
arts, reading, social studies, foreign language, art, music, 
gifted & talented, Chapter I, readiness and Horace Mann 
Grants. The Director of Math/Science, Computer Opera- 
tion & Budget is responsible for the following areas: 
kindergarten through grade twelve; mathematics; sciences; 
computer science; health education; physical education; 
in-service programs for the town and budget. 

The directors work in close harmony with the superinten- 
dent and the assistant superintendent. They also oversee 
and work closely with the department heads for the various 
curriculum areas at the middle schools and high school 
as well as those department heads who cover curriculum, 
kindergarten through grade twelve. 

Language Arts Development 

In language arts curriculum many changes are taking 
place. The reading program consists of a tri-basal plan, 
using Heath, Houghton Mifflin and Scribner in grades 1 
through 6. The Electronic Bookshelf enhances the reading 
program offering opportunities for enrichment and a wide 
variety of reading. Sustained Silent Reading is alive and 
well in our elementary and middle schools. 

Whole language is an integral part of many classrooms 
instructional plan. Original material written by children 
and read by children abound in many classrooms. Jour- 
nals, big books and poetry are featured throughout the 
school system. The ability to integrate many curriculum 
areas is a positive attribute of whole language. The children 
love reading and writing their own material, it is not only 
learning but it is also fun. 

A new handwriting system has been chosen for use in 
our schools. Three handwriting systems were piloted and 
a committee of teachers met throughout the fall and chose 
Zaner Bloser as the program for our schools. We look for- 
ward to its full implementation in September 1989. 

Social studies programs have been enriched this year by 
a variety of field trips to many interesting and historic 
places. 



The grade three curriculum in Chelmsford's schools has 
been completed and is in use in our classrooms. We have 
a new historic coloring book for the grade three social 
studies program, authored by Beverly Koltookian. This 
book is filled with important facts on our town. 

Massachusetts kits are in the process of being completed 
for grade four curriculum on our State. Videos and books 
on the state will be included for instruction and enrich- 
ment in the in-depth study of Massachusetts. 

The kindergarten committee completed its review of the 
program and philosophy of kindergarten and many ex- 
citing changes have occurred in this program. 

DIAL R was used in September as our screening device 
for kindergarten students. In addition there is a booklet 
on kindergarten available for parents, and an additional 
booklet for teachers. This was a most informative and pro- 
ductive project. 

The primary report card has been revised and was used 
in November for reporting childrens progress. 

Some goals for 1989 are: a review of our Gifted & 
Talented Program; a review of the intermediate report 
card, and a review of the language arts curriculum grades 
1 through 8. 

From the Director of Sciences 

The mathematics and science programs in the 
Chelmsford Schools continue to provide students with the 
strong technical background they will need as they enter 
the twenty-first century. 

During the past year, a great emphasis has been placed 
on integrating the computer into the mathemtics and 
science curriculums. This is especially true at the high 
school, where we have set up a small computer lab in the 
science area that is being used by students in a variety of 
courses. The computer is also being used extensively at the 
McCarthy and the High School as part of the writing pro- 
gram. For the first time, we are using the computer in the 
art and music areas. Our new Apple //GS computers have 
opened a whole new world of activities for our art and 
music students. The computer is opening new curriculum 
avenues for us every day, hopefully, we will be able to keep 
pace with the ever advancing technologies. 

The results of the Massachusetts Educational Assessment 
Testing Program showed that Chelmsford students in 
grades 4, 8 and 12 continue to score well above the state 
average and are competitive with students from similar 
schools. In addition to the Assessment results, we are ex- 
tremely pleased with our SAT mathematics result. Our 
average score was over 500 which is more than 30 points 
above the national average. 

It has been a busy and productive year, and we look for- 
ward to continued progress in 1989. 



60 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF CHAPTER I 

Chapter I is the bedrock on which federal aid to elemen- 
tary schools has been built. Chapter I grants are given to 
school sytems who qualify, and are focused on low- 
achieving disadvantaged students. These programs have 
been very successful nationwide and also in Chelmsford. 

The project proposal was written by the Director of 
Humanities and Chapter I Director, sent to the State 
Department of Education, approved, and has been once 
again implemented in the town. This is year one of a new 
three year project. 

Since 1975, Chapter I has been an integral part of the 
school system. Students are instructed in reading and math 
at the Harrington School (grades 1-2), the Parker School 
(grades 3-5), and the Westlands School (grades 1-5) and 
the McCarthy School (grade 6). The Chapter I Math Pro- 
gram is new this year at the McCarthy School. 

Chapter I teachers work in small groups and strive to 
supplement and enhance classroom instruction. A very 
dedicated staff, well planned curriculum and cooperation 
with the classroom teacher and parents make the Chapter 
I project in Chelmsford a very successful venture. 



FROM THE RESOURCE INSTRUCTOR 
FOR GIFTED/TALENTED 

The Enrichment Program of Chelmsford (EPOCH) is 
presently in its seventh year and services those students who 
seem to need extended enrichment as part of their total 
school experience. 

Because of financial constraints, the program was cut 
back considerably this year. Presently we have one instruc- 
tor instead of three as we had in the past. Grades 3 and 
4 are serviced. 

The two grades receiving services follow the established 
program model with a great deal of emphasis on thinking 
skills and advanced research skills. Each student is expected 
to do an in-depth study on a topic of interest sometime 
during the year. 

A pilot project is being carried out with one fourth grade 
class using the ODYSSEY OF THE MIND program. This 
is a creative problem -solving experience in which the 
students compete in a regional competition with other 
students from their own geographical area. 

Teachers are servied through consultation with the 
Resource Instructor and by being provided with a com- 
prehensive listing of Lending Library Curriculum Resource 
Materials from which they can make requests. 

EPOCH strives to provide for those students who can 
benefit from extended enrichment and to service teachers 
who work with these students. 



FROM THE SUPERVISOR OF 
INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

It was a busy and productive year for the school libraries 
and Cable 43. 





Elementary 


Middle 


High 


Total circulation 


110,330 


17.538 


10,125 


Number of books checked out 








per student 


53 


14 


5 


Average daily circulation 


613 


103 


56 


Total books purchased 


1.924 


780 


660 


Total books withdrawn* 


50 


140 


40 


Number of class visits 


All classes 
once per week 


180 


539 


Student Aides 




14 


10 


Adult Volunteers 


50 


1 






Several activities took place in the high school library. 
Workshops in online data base searches were conducted 
for 12 faculty members and 200 students. Some 6th grade 
students from the EPOCH program learned about high 
school library resources during a 10-week period. High 
school and EPOCH students took a field trip to the 
Statehouse for Kids and Computers Day to demonstrate 
to legislators what students are doing with computers. 
School and Library Media Month was promoted and a 10th 
grade entry won honorable mention in the statewide con- 
test. Students used Macintosh computers for publishing 
the Voice, a student newspaper, and Mosaics, a literary 
magazine. The computers were purchased with funds from 
the School Improvement Council. 

The NewsBank service was added to the middle school 
library along with a microfische reader to increase student 
research skills. The microfische reader was purchased with 
proceeds from the previous year's book fair. Some classes 
visited the library to use the Electronic Book Shelf pro- 
gram on the new Apple II E computer which came with 
a printer; this program will expand to other classes. 

There was much excitement about reading in the 
elementary schools. The Parents as Reading Partners was 
well received in all of the elementary schools. Parents and 
children reported reading together 154,000 times during 
the 8 months of the program. Calendars were sent home 
each month for parents and children to mark off the days 
they read together. PTO members tallied responses and 
distributed awards. Other special events included Read a 
T-Shirt Day, a Community Read-In, and a Ball of Yarn 
Day. Jim Trelease spoke at an evening session for parents 
and teachers. Illustrator Erik Ingraham spoke to second 
graders from Harrington, South Row and Westlands. All 
elementary schools are participating in the Electronic 
Bookshelf program; additional books are needed in this 
program to keep pace with the heavy demand. Class in- 
struction continued to take place in all schools; index use 
and subject access skills were introduced as a base for 
building on computer searching. 

Over 3,557 audio visual items were checked out from 
the Instructional Media Center during the school year. The 
breakdown included: 1,411 16mm films; 1,406 video tapes; 
664 sound filmstrips; 43 filmstrips; 26 audio cassettes; 7 
records. 



61 






Our audio visual technician routinely repaired and 
maintained equipment, checked 980 pieces of equipment 
during the end of the year inspection and assisted the staff 
at Cable 43 when needed. Our graphic artist continued 
to produce a variety of audio visual materials for staff 
throughout the system, to train student volunteers, and to 
work with students in developing class projects. He ex- 
perimented with computer graphics future assignments. 
Over 3,161 were catalogued by the cataloging department. 
The department participated in a complete book inven- 
tory at the Byam Elementary School and was able to do 
a partial inventory at the McCarthy school library. 

Cable 43 received a first-place award for the documen- 
tary "Mill Girls" at the Massachusetts Community Televi- 
sion Contest. Cable 43 also held its first open golf tourna- 
ment. This successful activity raised approximately $4,000. 

In addition to producing educational and community 
programs and training students, staff and public access 
people, the Cable 43 staff continued its involvement with 
distance learning. The boundaries of 2 -way interactive 
television were extended beyond Chelmsford and the 
University of Lowell's Instructional Network into Concord. 
With a Chapter 188 technology grant and approval for the 
use of channel 42 by the Board of Selectmen. Advanced 
Calculus and Speech were transmitted by Chelmsford and 
Concord High Schools, respectively. Speech was substituted 
for Russian due to equipment delays. The system was de- 
bugged with help from many people at several sites. 

Artists visited Chelmsford from the Guandong Province 
of the Peoples Republic of China; plans are being explored 
to set up a telecommunications exchange with the Guang- 
dong Department of Education. 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Massachusetts' Chapter 766 and the Federal Govern- 
ment's Public Law 94-142, the Education of Handicap- 
ped Children Act, were enacted to assure that all handicap- 
ped children have a free and appropriate education to be 
provided by the local community. 

The Special Education Department in Chelmsford is 
responsible for providing effective programs and services 
for children, ages three through twenty- one, who are 
found to have special needs. Part of this responsibility is 
to assure that each handicapped student receives an educa- 
tion designed to meet his or her unique learning needs and 
to receive these services in the least restrictive environment. 

As of December 1, 1988 the Special Education Depart- 
ment had 826 students registered to receive special educa- 
tion services which represents 15.7 percent of Chelmsford's 
total school enrollment. A staff of seventy special educa- 
tion personnel develop and implement the individualized 
educational plans for these students. For those students 
with severe learning and/or emotional needs, Chelmsford 



provides for placement in private day or residential schools 
as approved by the State Department of Education. 

For the 1988-1989 school year, the Chelmsford Special 
Education Department has a budget of $2,925,081, of 
which 219,582 is provided through grants by the federal 
government. 

Programs are continually being refined and expanded 
to meet the diverse and unique needs of the students. The 
Special Education Department in partnership with the 
Community Education Department has expanded the Ear- 
ly Childhood Program to serve the increasing number of 
children requiring early intervention. The high school 
special education program continues to work with the Mer- 
rimack Special Education Collaborative in providing 
students with pre-vocational and vocational programs to 
better prepare them for future employment and/or voca- 
tional education. 

Computer technology is an integral part of the Special 
Education instructional program. Staff is continually 
reviewing appropriate software and learning about the use 
of computers with special needs students. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Parent Advisory 
Council, whose purpose is to study and make recommen- 
dations to the school department in areas of special educa- 
tion and to facilitate communication within the community 
regarding special education, has been very active. They 
have presented many programs for parents and have im- 
plemented community programs such as in the area of 
recreation and after school programs. 

The Merrimack Special Education Collaborative, in 
which Chelmsford participates, continues to provide ef- 
fective and cost -efficient programs for children with low- 
incidence disabilities. Classes, held in Dracut and 
Tewksbury, service the needs of children from Chelmsford, 
Billerica, Dracut, Groton, Tewksbury, Tyngsboro and 
Westford. For the 1988-89 school year the Collaborative 
developed the Merrimack School, servicing adolescent 
students with social/emotional needs, who require a special 
setting to profit from their educational program. 

The Special Education Department, along with the Mer- 
rimack Special Education Collaborative, continues to pro- 
vide pre-vocational and vocational programs through the 
Center for Occupational Awareness and Placement (Pro- 
ject CO. A. P.). As a result, many students have been suc- 
cessfully placed in field training sites and subsequently 
enter into full-time employment. 

The Special Needs Service Booklet, describing the 
Chapter 766 process and services provided by the school 
department, is available at the McKay and Adams 
Libraries and at the Special Education Office. 

The Special Education Department will continue its 
quest to provide effective and cost efficient programs and 
services for the children we serve. 



62 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

During the 1987-1988 school year a comprehensive 
review of the Community Education Department was done 
by the Superintendent of Schools. Community Education 
Programs were found to have a positive impact and will 
continue to run on a self-supporting basis. 

Adult Education evening programs with approximate- 
ly 3,000 students taking special interest courses and Univer- 
sity level classes through Middlesex Community College 
and Northeastern University are held at Chelmsford High 
School. A K-12 Summer School program which enrolls an 
additional 600 students is held during July and August. 

The School Age Extended Day Program has continued 
to grow and now has grade K-2 students at Harrington 
School and grade 3-6 students at parker. Operating 7:00 
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on school days as well as snow and school 
vacation days, this program meets the needs of 250 students 
and their families. It is expected that this program will 
continue to grow. 

Community Education also schedules the outside use of 
our school facilities. In an attempt to be more cost effec- 
tive the School Committee increased building rental fees 
effective July 1988. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
GUIDANCE, K-12 

The Guidance Counseling Program in all Chelmsford 
Public Schools provides comprehensive services that are 
grouped into five functions: (1) Personal Counseling; (2) 
Education and Career Counseling; (3) Consultation; (4) 
Appraisal and (5) Referral. All five functions begin at the 
elementary level and continue through middle to high 
school. The performance of a particular counseling func- 
tion varies from the elementary to the secondary level, but 
the function itself remains continuous throughout the 
school years. 

In order to carry out these five functions effectively, the 
Guidance Department is staffed by six guidance counselors 
and S\i support personnel at the high school; three 



guidance counselors and one crisis counselor at the mid- 
dle school and one guidance counselor in each of the ele- 
mentary schools. 

• Post Secondary Education Placements 

In 1988, there were 532 graduates. Of those graduates, 
441 went on to post-secondary education which represents 
83%. 



4 year colleges 374 70%) 

2 year colleges 57 (11%) 

technical schools 10 (2%) 

Total Post-Secondary 441 (83%) 



In terms of non-educational placements, 64 students (12%) 
elected employment and 21 students (4%) joined the 
military. 

• Advanced Placement Program: 

In May of 1988, 120 students took 201 Advanced Place- 
ment examinations at Chelmsford High School with 85.6% 
of the grades falling in the 3-5 range. The program grades 
on a five-point college-level scale: 



5 — extremely well qualified 

4 — well qualified 

3 — qualified 

2 — possibly qualified 

1 — no recommendation 



Generally, AP grades of 4 and 5 are comparable to college 
grades of A and grades of 3 and 2 most comparable to col- 
lege grades of B and C respectively. Many colleges will 
award a third to a full year of placement and credit to suc- 
cessful AP candidates. 

• Drop Out Rate: 

The drop out rate at Chelmsford High School continues 
to be low. During the 1987-88 academic year, CHS had a 
total student enrollment of 1889. The number of drop outs 
was 41, which represents a drop out rate of 2.2%. 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1987-88 



Grades 9-12 



Boys 
Girls 
Total 



Req. To 
Employment Leave 

7 2 

2 

9 2 



Voluntary 
Withdrawal 

13 
17 
30 



Total 

22 
19 
41 



63 



• CHS Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores (SAT 

Chelmsford High School average scores for the Class of 
1988 continue to be higher than the average Massachusetts 
and National scores. 

In the verbal area, Chelmsford scored 455 which is 23 
points higher than the State average (432) and 27 points 
higher than the National average (428). It should be noted 
that in the verbal area, the State average fell 3 points from 
435 in 1987 to 432 in 1988. The National average also fell 
2 points from 430 in 1987 to 428 in 1988. 

In the math area, Chelmsford scored 510 which is 36 
points higher than the State average (474) and 34 points 
higher than the National average (476). It should be noted 
that in the math area, the State and National averages re- 
mained the same for 1988 and 1987: State average 474; the 
National average 476. 

• State Basic Skills Tests Gr. 3, 6, 9 

The State of Massachusetts, Dept. of Education, requires 
every public school to test all students at Gr. 3, 6 and 9 
annually. The purpose of the Basic Skills Testing Program 
is "to identify students who have not achieved mastery of 
basic skills in reading, writing and mathematics." 





Passing 


Failure 




Rate 


Rate 


Gr. 9 Reading 


97% 


3% 


CHS Math 


98% 


2% 


Writing 


97% 


2% 
(1% unknown) 


Gr. 6 Reading 


91% 


9% 


McC Math 


96% 


4% 


Writing 


97% 


3% 


Gr. 3 Reading 


98% 


3% 


System Math 


97% 


3% 


Writing 


95% 


4% 
(1% unknown) 



• State Education Assessment Program — Gr. 4, 8, 12 

The State of Massachusetts, Dept. of Education, requires 
every public school to test all students in Gr. 4, 8, 12 every 
other years. The purpose of the Assessment Testing Program 
is to measure the effectiveness of curriculum and not stu- 
dent progress. Test scores are compared to a State average. 
Scores range from 1000 to 1600 with the State average be- 
ing 1300. 








Average 


Test Score 




State 


School 


Gr. 12 Reading 


1300 


1400 


CHS Math 


1300 


1410 


Science 


1300 


1400 


Soc. Stud. 


1300 


1400 


Gr. 8 Reading 


1300 


1360 


McC Math 


1300 


1380 


Science 


1300 


1360 


Soc. Stud. 


1300 


1380 


Gr. 4 Reading 


1300 


1380 


System Math 


1300 


1400 


Science 


1300 


1380 


Soc. Stud. 


1300 


1380 



• Achievement Tests Results Gr. 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 

Chelmsford Public Schools utilize the Metroplitan 
Achievement Tests (MAT6) to measure individual student 
growth by defining strengths and weaknesses within several 
academic areas. Results are being reported in National 
Percentiles since percentile ranks indicate the relative stand- 
ing of a pupil or group in comparison with other pupils 
of the same grade who took the test at a comparable time 
throughout the nation. For example, a score of 79% tile 
would mean that our students did better than 79% of the 
students who took this test throughout the nation. 



Grade 2 




Grade 4 




Reading 


68% tile 


Reading 


79% tile 


Language 


65% tile 


Language 


73% tile 


Math 


59%tile 


Math 


69% tile 


Science 


64% tile 


Science 


73% tile 


Social St. 


65% tile 


Social St. 


70% tile 


Grade 6 




Grade 8 




Reading 


77% tile 


Reading 


75% tile 


Language 


70% tile 


Language 


70% tile 


Math 


68%tile 


Math 


71% tile 


Science 


67% tile 


Science 


70% tile 


Social St. 


66% tile 


Social St. 


70% tile 


Grade 10 








Reading 


68% tile 






Language 


60% tile 






Math 


71% tile 






Science 


67% tile 






Social St. 


72% tile 







64 



• Chelmsford High School Career Center 1988 

The CHS Career Center continues to be a model pro- 
gram of vocational, occupational and college information 
distribution. The Center is supplied with the most recent 
materials available in computerized and non- computerized 
fashion. Additionally, college representatives, military per- 
sonnel and industry liaison are scheduled frequently in the 
Career Center to meet with interested students. The Career 
Center is staffed by three highly efficient support person- 
nel always ready to assist students, their parents, and the 
community at large. 

• Chelmsford High School Job Fair: 

On May 4, 1988, personnel representatives from over 
twenty-five area companies participated in the annual Job 
Fair. Students had the opportunity to speak to personnel 
representatives and interview for job openings in a diverse 
group of businesses and industries. The response from com- 
panies and students was enthusiastic and positive. 

• Federally Funded Occupational Education Projects: 

Chelmsford High School again received federal funds for 
several projects in collaboration with the Business and 
Guidance Departments. In the third year of the Specializ- 
ed Training for Placement in Industry Project, students 
received special training and instruction in keyboarding 
skills and office procedures using a variety of computer 
equipment and software. 

Another successful federally-funded project was Com- 
puter Applications for Handicapped and Disadvantaged 
students. Staffed by a Support Teacher, students were given 
hands-on computer training in a variety of business ap- 
plications software programs and computer literacy skills. 

Students seeking part-time, permanent and summer em- 
ployment were assisted in job placement. Over 300 students 
were placed in part-time employment, while 78% of non- 
college bound seniors seeking permanent employment 
found jobs through the placement office. 

• Chelmsford High School Service Study Program 

Approximately 200 students enroll in the Service Study 
and Career Exploration programs each year and provide 
services to the schools and the town. 

The Service Study Program is a voluntary elective design- 
ed to combine the students academic studies with prac- 
tical experience as they use their free time to pursue an 
area similar to their chosen field. Many students are in- 
terested in working in various special needs programs while 
others prefer working with our athletic trainer. 

The Career Exploration Program gives an opportunity 
to all students to supplement their schedule by volunteer- 
ing to work as an assistant in our offices, library, science 
lab, Graphic Arts Department, and the Cable 43 televi- 
sion studio. 



Flexible scheduling allows the interested students to par- 
ticipate in the area of their choice, and credit for the elec- 
tive^) in given on the basis of performance, attendance, 
and the time that is volunteered. 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 

Since 1981 , when the School Department started its own 
in-house computerization effort, all major school business 
related applications have been automated on our computer 
systems. These systems include a DEC 11/44, VAX 750, 
and various microcomputers. In-house staff now maintain 
all data bases on students, accounting, personnel, census, 
scheduling, attendance, report cards and a plethora of 
other applications. 

The Town Clerk's Office and the school computer facili- 
ty continue to work as a team in the maintenance of town 
citizen data on the school computer system. The town 
Clerk's Office provides the staff needed to update and 
maintain the records, while the school computer staff pro- 
vides the resources and technical expertise. The town cen- 
sus, Lists of Residents Book, voter registration lists, precinct 
reports, name and address labels, dog registers, school 
department enrollment data, jury lists, and jury tapes are 
all processed on the school computer. 

Other town departments serviced in some way by the 
school computer include: Council on Aging, Town Can- 
didates for Office, Town Library, Selectmen's School War- 
rant Report, Community Education, PTA, Booster Club, 
Nashoba Valley Technical Vocational School, Police 
Department, Commission on Handicapped and Planning 
Board. 

Future involvements will include networking computers, 
data communications and telecommunications. Technical 
obstacles to these formidable endeavors are being evaluated 
and have the potential to significantly increase the pro- 
ductivity of the schools. 



IN CONCLUSION: 

We are coming to the end of a decade that experienced 
a period of exceedingly rapid change in education. We will 
soon begin a decade in which the pace of change un- 
doubtedly will increase. If we are to survive and provide 
the necessary tools for our youth to compete we will need 
to be alert and responsive to the new demands. 

The School Committee will continue to provide the 
direction of our school system by continuing to effect 
budget economics while maintaining a quality educational 
system. In an attempt to answer the needs of the communi- 
ty, the School Committee will conduct a townwide goals 
survey during the next calendar year. Hopefully, the results 



65 



will provide an indication of where the community desires 
the school system to place an emphasis. The School Com- 
mittee recognizes that a school system is measured both 
qualitatively and quantitatively as it reflects the needs of 
the community and its values. Given the wealth of human 
resoures of our staff parents, community at large and 
students, we are confident that Chelmsford has the talent 
and the will to meet the challenge of the nineties. 

Sincere thanks once again are extended to the town of- 
ficials and boards, to the school personnel, to the Parent 
Teacher Organization, to the School Improvement Coun- 
cils, to avisory study committees, school volunteers, and 
to the citizens for their cooperation and assistance this past 
year. 

Retired: 

George Simonian, Principal, Chelmsford High School 

Donald Boucher, Dean, Chelmsford High School 

Vera Wolnik, Secretary, Chelmsford High School 

Dorothy Rostron, Teacher, South Row School 

Patricia Dion, Teacher, Westlands School 

Dorothy Q. McDonald, Teacher, McCarthy Middle School 

Ann Chicklis, Teacher, Harrington School 

Arthur Kinney, Custodian, McCarthy Middle School 

Elias McCormack, Custodian, Chelmsford High School 

Mary St.Onge, Matron, Chelmsford High School 

Francis E. Heroux, Maintenance 

Evaline McPhillip, Chelmford Food Service 

Rose Ann Higgins, Chelmsford Food Service 

Eleanor Delmore, Chelmsford Food Service 

IN MEMORIAM 

The community and the school department were griev- 
ed by the deaths of the principal of the Parker School, a 
teacher from the Westlands School, and a member of the 
Maintenance Department. These fine people were loved 
and respected by everyone. They will long be remembered 
for their dedicated service to the school system and their 
devotion to the children of the town of Chelmsford. 
James Doyle, Principal, Parker School 
Karen Nolin, Teacher, Westlands School 
Arthur (Red) Gervais, Maintenance Dept. 






66 



CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 




Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman; John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman; Robert P.Joyce, Clerk 






67 



REPORT OF THE SEWER COMMISSION 

Construction of the Phase I A and IB sewer programs 
continued at the beginning of 1988 with six (6) sewer con- 
tracts fully underway. By year's end, eleven (11) sewer con- 
tracts were in various stages of completion placing the Town 
of Chelmsford a major step closer to the reality of a totally 
functional wastewater collection system. The Phase I A pro- 
gram, or North Chelmsford sewers, reached a completion 
percentage of 85% by December 31, 1988. This area should 
anticipate program completion by mid -April, 1989. At that 
time, residents will be allowed to connect individual 
buildings to the North Chelmsford collection system, upon 
the completion of the Southwell Field Pumping Station. 

The year 1989 shall constitute sewer work concentrated 
in the Chelmsford Center area (Phase IB and IIA). As the 
residents of North Chelmsford go "on-line", the Center area 
residents will see sewer construction work continue such 
that residential hook-ups can take place as early as August, 
1989. 

Staffing requirements will increase in 1989 as operations 
and maintenance of functioning sewerage facilities will be 
necessary. The Commission is presently reviewing the 
credentials of candidates to fill the managerial post of a 
full-time sewer system Superintendent and a full-time sewer 
maintenance person. Additional full-time clerical assistance 



will be required to assist in processing betterment assess- 
ments, sewer connection permits, and user charge billing. 

The Sewer Commission membership also underwent a 
change in 1988, with the resignation of Jean R. Organ, who 
had served the Town as Sewer Commission clerk and 
member for the past ten (10) years. In September, 1988 
Robert P. Joyce was appointed to serve on the Commission, 
at which time he became immediately instrumental in the 
acquisition of computer hardware and software to be pur- 
chased by the Commission. 

Currently, the Commission is actively pursuing new 
available funding for future phases and hopes to be as suc- 
cessful in 1989 as in 1988 when over $3,700,000 of federal 
and state — assisted funds were received. 

The Commission views 1989 with great optimism. The 
Election and Town Meeting in the Spring of 1989 will con- 
tain important ballot questions and warrant articles, 
respectively to address the need for future construction in 
identified needs areas. At that time, voters will determine 
the future of the Town's overall sewer program. 

As a review of 1988, the Chelmsford Sewer Commission 
and the Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District offer 
the following progress report on sewer and pumping sta- 
tion construction contracts: 



NORTH CHELMSFORD 






Project Name 
(Contract No.) 


Contractor 


Start/Finish 
Date 


Total 
Cost 


Grant 
Funding 


Percent Completion 
1-1-88/12-31-88 


Southwell Field 

Pump Station 

(85-1) 


P. Gioioso & Sons 


1-88/4-89 


$2,468,999 


$1,602,000 


2.7% 65.6% 


N. Chelmsford 

Interceptor 

(85-2) 


P. Gioioso & Sons 


6-87/2-89 


$3,838,000 


$2,445,000 


53.3%/90.3% 


N. Chelmsford 

Laterals 

(85-3) 


Andreassi Bros. 


4-87/6-88 


$1,515,000 


$757,000 


56.8%/92.8% 


N. Chelmsford 

Laterals 

(85-4) 


P. Gioioso & Sons 


4-87/6-88 


$1,444,000 


$605,000 


75.4%/95.6% 


N. Chelmsford 

Laterals 

(85-5) 


Albanese Bros. 


6-87/1-89 


$2,253,000 


$1,161,000 


56.6%/93.6% 



68 



CHELMSFORD CENTER 



Project Name 
(Contract No.) 


Contractor 


Start/Finish 
Date 


Total 
Cost 


Grant 
Funding 


Percent Completion 
1-1-88/12-31-88 


Katrina Road 

Pump Station 

(86-1) 


P. Gioioso & Sons 


7-88/9-89 


$2,412,000 


$1,637,000 


0%/34.3% 


Chelmsford Ctr. 

Laterals 

(86-2) 


D & C Const. 


10-88/10-89 


$4,686,000 


$3,021,000 


0%/12% 


Chelmsford Ctr. 

Laterals 

(86-3) 


D & C Const. 


10-88/10-89 


$4,015,000 


$1,400,000 


0%/15% 


Richardson Rd. 

Area Laterals 

(88-1) 


P. Gioioso & Sons 


6-88/11-88 


$1,176,000 


$ o 


0%/100% 



CHELMSFORD CENTER INDUSTRIAL SEWER DISTRICT (CCISD) 



Project Name 
(Contract No.) 


Contractor 


Start/Finish 
Date 


Total 
Cost 


Grant 
Funding 


Percent Completion 
1-1-88/12-31-88 


CCISD Laterals 
(IND 86-1) 

CCISD Laterals 
(IND 87-1) 


D & C Const. 
Middlesex Corp. 


10-87/11-88 
10-87/6-88 


$3,562,000 
$175,000 


$1,290,000 
$ 67,000 


21%/100% 
90%/100% 



The Commission also advertised three (3) sewer contracts during the year with the following results: 



Contract 



Bid Opening 
Date 



Successful Bidding 
Contractor 



Contract 
Amount 



88-1 
86-3 
86-2 



May 26, 1988 
Sept. 14, 1988 
Sept. 20, 1988 



P. Gioioso & Sons 

P. Gioioso & Sons 

D & C Construction 



$ 833,484 
$2,660,975 
$3,344,858 



As with previous bid openings, 1988 bidding proved to 
be competitive. The three (3) contracts advertised averag- 
ed eleven (11) contractors per sewer contract. The com- 
petitiveness yielded a benefit in the form of cost savings 
approximately $1,400,000 below the engineer's estimate. 

The Commission anticipates the new year will bring fur- 
ther progress to provide a wastewater collection system that 
will meet the environmental requirements of the Town of 
Chelmsford and protect our drinking water supplies. Sewer 
contracts to service the Kensington Drive and Golden Cove 
Road areas will be advertised for bids in early 1989. The 
Commission will continue to administer these projects by 
maximizing the construction grant funding programs in 
conjunction with those funds appropriated by the 
community. 



The Sewer Commission has also embarked on a Town 
Wide Drainage Facilities Plan to identify and analyze and 
alleviate specific drainage problems throughout the Town. 
Specific recommendations on drainage improvements in 
the Deep Brook Drainage Basin are anticipated in early 
1989. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

John P. Emerson, Jr., Chairman 

Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 

Robert P. Joyce, Clerk 



69 



OFFICE OF 
THE TREASURER-TAX COLLECTOR 

DEPT. MEMBERS: 

James R. Doukszewicz, Treasurer-Tax Collector 
Florence M. Ramsay, Asst. Treasurer 
Margaret M. Mullen, Dept. Asst. to Tax Collector 
Lorraine D. Parkhurst, Payroll Coordinator 
Bettie A. Osborne, Senior Clerk, Accts. Receivable 

& Accts. Payable 
Donna M. Rogers, Senior Clerk, Part-time, Data Processing 

Functions 
Judith Olsson, Senior Clerk, Part-time, Municipal Lien 

Certificates 



Balance of funds as of 7-1-87 


$ 9,006,523.00* 


Receipts through 6-30-88 




76,580,631.00 


Paid out on warrants 




(75,226,509.00) 


Fund Balance as of 6-30-88 


$10,360,645.00 


Breakdown of Fund Ba 


a nee 


as of 6-30-88: 


Cash in banks 




3,418,877.00** 


Misc. Trust Funds 




1,218,466.00 


Special Revenue Funds 




2,328,554.00*** 


Capital Projects Funds 




3,394,748.00**** 


Total 




$10,360,645.00 


* includes trust funds 


in custody of Treasurer & 


Trustees 






** includes money market, repo, checking, and com- 


pensating balance funds derived from taxes 


*** funds on hand & in 


banks from sources other than 


tax receipts 






****funds on hand & in 


banks from bond sales and 


temporary note sales that 


are awaiting expendi- 


ture — largely due to 


ongoikng sewer project. 



NOTES: 

The year nineteen hundred and eighty-eight (1988) saw 
the transition of the medical insurance functions take place, 
with the Board of Selectmen having placed these functions 
under the jurisdiction of the Veterans Dept. This enabled 
my office to re-open on Wednesdays, effective January of 
1989, and it enabled me to rehire some seasonal help for 
peak (tax rush) periods. This will save manpower hours 
allotted in compensatory time off due to existing staff hav- 
ing been used at peak periods without funds to pay them 
for their efforts. 

Bond sales occurred in August of 1988 for Capital Pro- 
jects approved at the Annual Town Meeting of 1987. Sewer 
bonds were also sold in January of 1988 for $5,000,000.00 
of costs realized from the payment of bills for sewer pum- 
ping stations and lateral sewer constructions. 

Temporary borrowings to meet the costs of operations 
were conducted on two occasions for a total of 
$8,000,000.00. The tax receipts from estimated bills issued 
in the fall of 1988 were lower than normal due to the fact 
that the Town cannot bill on an estimated basis for any 



amount in excess of 40-45% of the prior year's taxes. This 
made the second borrowing to cover operational costs 
higher than what could have been the case had regular 
tax bills been issued rather than estimated tax bills. 

The spring of 1989 revenues will be far greater than those 
of the fall of 1988 due to the new tax rate and new assessed 
valuations having been applied to all properties taxation. 

The exempted costs of the sewer project are raised over 
and above the constraints of Prop. 2 1 / £, and this will in- 
crease the taxation amounts paid by property owners in 
Chelmsford starting with the spring of 1989 tax bills. 

Revenues from sewer tie-ins and betterment assessments 
will reduce the amount of additional taxation to be paid 
by the taxpayers of Chelmsford for sewer construction work 
once they are received. 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 

Ernest F Day 

Board of Selectmen Executive Secretary 

Bernard F. Lynch 

Town Counsel 

James M. Harrington 

Police Chief 

Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Police Chiefs 

Pennryn D. Fitts, James C. Greska 

Fire Chief 

Robert L. Hughes 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Charles Galloway, James A. Sousa 

Cemetery Superintendent 
Frank R. Peterson 

Park Superintendent 
Donald P. Gray 

Director of Public Health 
Richard J. Day 

Assistant Director of Public Health 

John P. Emerson, Jr. 

Board of Health Physician 
Michael J. Dean, M.D. 

Town Nurse 

Judith Dunigan 



70 



Town Engineer 

James E. Pearson, RE. 

Assistant Town Engineer 

Anthony Ma 

Superintendent of Streets 

Michael A. Crory 

Inspector of Animals 
Dr. Martin A. Gruber 

Building Inspector 

Anthony Zagzoug 

Wiring Inspector 
Francis E. Cunningham 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley 

Local Inspector 

Milton H. Kinney, Jr. 

Plumbing Inspector 

William H. Shedd 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Council on Aging Director 
Martin J. Walsh 

Superintendent of Public Buildings 

Robert Deletetsky 

Veterans' Agent 
Mary K. McAuliffe 

Dog Officer 

Franklin Warren 

Insect Pest Control Officer 
Richard J. Day 

Hazardous Waste Coordinator 
Richard J. Day 

Assistant Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney 

Assistant Treasurer 

Florence Ramsay 



Administrative Assistant to Assessors 

Nancy L. Maher 

Sewer Department Assistant 
Evelyn L. Newman 

Sewer De-artment Clerk 

Jacqueline A. Sheehy 

Planning Board Clerk 
Joan Pare 

Board of Appeals/Conservation Clerk 

Marjorie Hennessy 

Recreation Commission Clerk 

Lorraine Murphy 

Finance Committee Clerk 

Susan Olsen 

Personnel Board Clerk 
Louise Beauchesne 

Rent Control Board Clerk 

Elizabeth Kopicko 

Historic District Commission Clerk 

Mary Caffelle 






Assistant Town Accountant 

Mary Villare 

Administrative Assistant to Executive Secretary 
Judith E. Carter 

Board of Selectmen's Clerk 
Beth A. Cutrumbes 
Marian D. Currier 



71 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED BALANCE SHEET— ALL FUND TYPES AND ACCOUNT GROUP 

JUNE 30, 1988 



ASSETS: 



GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 



FIDUCIARY 
FUND TYPE 



ACCOUNT 
GROUP 



GENERAL 



GENERAL TOTAL 

SPECIAL CAPITAL TRUST AND LONG-TERM (MEMORAN- 

REVENUE PROJECTS AGENCY DEBT DUM) ONLY) 



Cash and Temporary Investments 

Property Taxes Receivable: 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Accounts Receivable: 
Intergovernmental: 

Chelmsford Center Industrial Sewer District 

Other Accounts Receivable: 
Motor Vehicle Excise: 

Current Year 

Prior Years 
Farm Animal Excise 
Tax Title 
Tax Foreclosures 
Departmental 
DEF Tax CH59 CL41A 

Due from (to) Other Funds 

Amount to be Provided for 
Payment of Notes 

Amount to be Provided for 

Retirement of General Long-Term Debt 

Total Assets 



5.418.877 

824,090 
110,256 

185,673 



,328,554 



$ 3,394,748 



$1,218,466 



553,459 




— 


— 


- 


108,583 




— 


- 


— 


406 




- 


— 


— 


9,825 




- 


— 


— 


29,312 




- 


— 


— 


3,684 




— 


- 


54,051 


62,863 




- 


- 


- 


( 8,153) 


( 


11,050) 


- 


19,203 


- 




- 


8,003,481 


- 


$5,298,875 


$2,317,504 


$11,398,229 


$1,291,720 



$10,360,645 

824,090 
110,256 

185,673 



553,459 

108,583 

406 

9,825 

29,312 

57,735 

62,863 



8,003,481 



8,965,000 



8,965,000 



$8,965,000 $29,271,328 



LIABILITIES: 



Accounts Payable 


$ 618,530 


$ 89,653 


Payroll Withholdings 


321,715 


— 


Other Liabilities 


51,034 


— 


Deferred Revenue 


1,373,012 


— 


Reserve for Abatements and Exemptions 


219,618 


— 


Notes Payable 


— 


— 


Bonds Payable 


- 


- 


Total Liabilities 


2,583,909 


89,653 



FUND EQUITY: 

Reserved: 

Encumbrances 

Appropriation Deficit 

Over Assessments 

Endowments 
Unreserved: 

Designated 

Undesignated 

Total Fund Equity 

Total Liabilities and Fund Equity 



19,900 



8,003,481 



8,023,381 



- 


— 


$ 728,083 


— 


— 


321,715 


- 


- 


51,034 


54,051 


- 


1,427,063 


— 


— 


219,618 


— 


- 


8,003,481 


8,965,000 


8.965.000 
8,965,000 




54,051 


19,715,994 



796,575 

( 214,825) 

13,048 

654,613 
1,465,555 


2,227,851 


3,374,848 


1,237,669 


- 


796,575 

( 214,825) 

13,048 

7,494,981 
1,465,555 


2,714,966 


2,227,851 
$2,317,504 


3,374,848 
$11,398,229 


1,237,669 
$1,291,720 




9,555,334 


$5,298,875 


$8,965,000 


$29,271,328 



72 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND TRUST & AGENCY FUNDS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1988 



REVENUES: 

Property Taxes 
Intergovernmental 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax 
Investment Income 
Departmental 

Total Revenues 











(COMBINED 




SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST AND 


MEMORANDUM 


GENERAL 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 


AGENCY 


ONLY) 


$23,330,129 


_ 


_ 


_ 


$23,330,129 


9,821,719 


4,486,209 


- 


— 


14,307,928 


1,959,576 


— 


— 


— 


1,959,576 


359,879 


17,789 


— 


100,217 


477,885 


1,466,617 


1,645,701 
6,149,699 


- 


647,859 
748,076 


3,760,177 


36,937,920 


- 


43,835,695 



EXPENDITURES: 



General Government 

Public Safety 

Education 

Public Works 

Culture and Recreation 

Health and Sanitation 

Human Services 

Maturing Debt and Interest 

State and County Assessment 

Total Expenditures 

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
Over Expenditures 



4,015,803 


58,071 


111,076 


872,646 


5,057,596 


5,425,111 


64,950 


560,635 


569,034 


6,619,730 


20,603,266 


2,026,039 


755,559 


- 


23,384,864 


1,883,771 


102,275 


634,700 


— 


2,620,746 


792,460 


194,404 


73,612 


— 


1,060,476 


1,455,117 


2,043,560 


7,366,488 


— 


10,865,165 


448,756 


34,588 


19,753 


230 


503,327 


1,431,404 


— 


- 


- 


1,431,404 


506,856 


- 


- 


- 


506,856 


36,562,544 


4,523,887 


9,521,823 


1,441,910 


52,050,164 


375,376 


1,625,812 


( 9,521,823) 


( 693,834) 


( 8,214,469) 



OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 



Bond Proceeds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 


582,969 

( 816,789) 

( 233,820) 


( 
( 


11,799 
360,103) 

348,304) 


9,507,067 
3,520 


801,470 
( 222,866) 

578,604 


9,507,067 

1,399,758 

( 1,399,758) 


Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) 


9,510,587 


9,507,067 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources Over 
Expenditures and Other Uses 



141,556 



1,277,508 



( 11,236) 



( 115,230) 



1,292,598 



Fund Balance at Beginning of Year 
Fund Balance at End of Year 



2,573,410 
$2,714,966 



950,343 



$2,227,851 



3,386,084 

$3,374,848 



1,352,899 
$1,237,669 



8,262,736 
59,555,334 



73 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 

GENERAL FUND 

SCHEDULE OF TAXES RECEIVABLE 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1988 



UNCOLLECTED 
TAXES 
JULY 1, 1987 COMMITMENTS 



LESS 

ABATEMENTS 

AND 

ADJUSTMENTS 



LESS 

TRANSFERS 

TO 

TAX TITLE 



LESS 

NET 

COLLECTIONS 



UNCOLLECTED 

TAXES 

JUNE 30, 1988 



Real Estate 



1988 
1987 
1986 



733,861 
87,019 



820,880 



$23,078,395 



23,078,395 



$234,587 
3,582 
11,090 



249,259 



24,899 



24,899 



$22,032,948 


$810,860 


618,749 


86,631 


59,937 


15,992 



22,711,634 



913,483 



Personal Property 



1988 
1987 
1986 
1985 
1984 



— 


520,430 


4,183 


14,782 


— 


10,180 


8,421 


- 


7,308 


3,505 


— 


— 


3,387 


- 


- 


30,095 


520,430 


21,671 


$850,975 


$23,598,825 


$270,930 



$24,899 



503,017 


13,230 


( 1,108) 


5,710 


( 810) 


1,923 


3,505 


- 


3,387 


- 


507,991 


20,863 


$23,219,625 


$934,346 



Motor Vehicle Excise 



1988 
1987 
1986 
1985 
1984 



— 


1,699,481 


57,363 


87,609 


926,229 


96,384 


37,157 


25,715 


4,133 


23,510 


— 


20,203 


12,037 


- 


12,037 


$160,313 


$2,651,425 


$190,120 



1,088,659 


553,459 


834,729 


82,725 


32,882 


25,857 


3,307 


- 



$1,959,577 



$662,041 



Farm Animal Excise 



1988 
1987 



406 
519 

$925 



519 

$519 



406 



$406 



74 



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75 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

JUNE 30, 1988 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT FUNDS: 

In Custody of Treasurer 

In Custody of Library Trustees 

In Custody of Selectmen 

In Custody of Veterans 

Emergency Fund Committee 



$1,084,339 

120,216 

976 

12,935 



IN CUSTODY OF TREASURER: 

Geo. W. Barris-Varney Playground 
Conservation Fund 
Wright Reservation 
Stabilization Fund 
Insurance Sinking Fund 
Educational Collaborative 
Police Special Account 
Group Ins. Claims Chap 32B 
Cemetery Funds: 

Geo. W. Barris Memorial 

Perpetual Care 

Adam Emerson 

Christopher Roby 

Vileata S. Douglas 

Baptist Pond Cemetery 

IN CUSTODY OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES: 

Amos F. Adams 

Geo. W. Barris 

Frances Clark 

Clement Fund 

Albert H. Davis 

Frederick B. Edwards 

Nathan B. Edwards 

Victor E. Edwards 

Adam Emerson 

Ora Flint 

George Memorial 

Thomas P. Proctor 

Serlina Richardson 

Joseph E. Warren 

Gertrude Wright 

Aaron George-Cemetery Fund 



I 5,495 

8,750 

30,807 

376,917 

71,812 

944 

3,720 

51,758 

10,089 

505,859 

1,272 

12,608 
3,002 
1,306 

1,084,339 



33,327 

291 

10,349 

32,391 

1,379 

4,690 

420 

2,290 

282 

1,802 

3,545 

22,364 

752 

321 

2,762 

3,251 

120,216 



IN CUSTODY OF SELECTMEN: 

Emma Gay-Varney Playground 
IN CUSTODY OF VETERANS: 

Emergency Fund Committee: 
Veterans Emergency Fund 



$1,218,466 



976 



12,935 
$1,218,466 



76 



FISCAL YEAR 1988— EXPENDITURES BY FUND 



DEPARTMENT 



GENERAL 
FUND 



SPECIAL 
REVENUE 



CAPITAL 
PROJECTS 



TRUST & 
AGENCY 



COMBINED 
TOTALS 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 

Accounting 

Assessors 

Board of Appeals 

Cable TV Commission 

Charter Commission 

Conservation Commission 

Conservation Land Purchase 

Constable 

Data Processing 

Elections 

Employee Benefits: 

Chapter 32B Insurance 
County Retirement Assessment 
Medicare Tax 

Unemployment Compensation 
Veterans Pension Claims 

Finance Committee 

Historic District Commission 

Historical Commission 

Law 

Liability Insurance 

Medical-Retired Police/Fire 

Mobile Home Rent Control 

Moderator 

NMAC Assessment 

Personnel Board 

Planning Board 

Public Buildings 

Registrars 

Resource Recovery Committee 

Selectmen 

Town Clerk 

Town Clock 

Town Reports 

Treasurer 

Total General Government 

PUBLIC SAFETY: 

Dog Officer 

Dog Pound Construction 

Emergency Management 

Fire 

Hydrant Service 

Insect Pest Control 

Inspection 

Police 

Police — Outside Detail 

Sealer Weights & Measures 

Traffic & Safety Committee 

Tree Warden 

Total Public Safety 
EDUCATION: 



137,575 

224,680 

7,137 

3,500 

697 

7,240 

14,309 

361 

9,435 

20,329 

500,055 

1,182,316 

22,630 

10.764 

6,068 

2,551 

1,220 

332 

89,809 

673.258 

4,329 

1,372 

375 

9,000 

579 

25,055 

148,354 

33,556 

7,835 

129,599 

117,330 

600 

5,200 

207,053 



3,604,503 



32,681 

62,701 

2,369 

2,515,997 

81,000 

11,930 

184,761 

2,557,831 

2,212 
21,594 
14,875 



5,487,951 



2,182 
54,562 



8,901 



1,708 



6,234 



866,412 



24,201 



54,003 
2,360 



21,230 



58,071 



111,076 



872,646 



30,000 



34,950 



548,428 



12,207 



569,034 



64,950 



560,635 



569,034 



139,757 

279,242 

7,137 

3,500 

697 

13,474 

23,210 

361 

9,435 

22,037 

1,366,467 

1,182,316 

22,630 

10,764 

6,068 

2,551 

1,220 

332 

89,809 

673,258 

4,329 

1,372 

375 

9,000 

579 

25,055 

172,555 

33,556 

7,835 

183,602 

119,690 

600 

5,200 

228,283 



4,646,296 



32,681 

62,701 

2,369 

3,094,425 

81,000 

11,930 

184,761 

2,604,988 

569,034 

2,212 

21,594 

14,875 



6,682,570 



Public Schools 

Nashoba Regional Tech HS 

Total Education 



19,965,746 
637,520 


2,026,039 


755,559 




22,747,344 
637,520 


20,603,266 


2,026,039 


755,559 





23,384,864 



PUBLIC WORKS: 



Highway 

Snow & Ice Removal 
Street Lighting 
Town Engineer 

Total Public Works 



1,178,505 

484,825 

132,399 

88,042 



1,883,771 



102,275 



102,275 



634,700 



634,700 



1,915,480 

484,825 

132,399 

88,042 



2,620,746 



CULTURE AND RECREATION: 



77 



Cultural Council 

Holiday Decorating Committee 

Library 

Memorial Day 

Park 

Recreation Commission 

Town Celebration 

Varney Playground 

Southwell Field Project 

Total Culture & Recreation 



95 


20,317 




750 






677,182 


20,395 


51,377 


1,000 






41,014 




8,000 


64,953 


6,806 


14,235 


2,214 






5,252 







227,000 



1,019,460 



167,202 



214,720 



73,612 



20,412 

750 

748,954 

1,000 

49,014 

85,994 

2,214 

5,252 

394,202 



1,307,792 



HEALTH AND SANITATION: 

Animal Inspector 
Board of Health 
Lowell Mental Health 
Sewer Commission 
Waste Collection 

Total Health & Sanitation 

HUMAN SERVICES: 

Cemetery 

Commission on Handicapped 

Council on Aging 

Elder Services of Mer Valley 

Sr. Citizen Center 

Veterans Benefits 

Total Human Services 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST: 

Principal Payments 
Interest Payments 

Total Debt & Interest 
STATE & COUNTY ASSESSMENTS: 



1,200 






147,123 


10,410 


253,702 


8,695 






115,766 


2,033,150 


7,112,786 


1,182,333 






1,455,117 


2,043,560 


7,366,488 



233,208 


1,350 


94 




106,473 


12,922 


1,800 




121,460 




107,181 





570,216 



962,150 
469,254 



1,431,404 



19,753 



230 



14,272 



19,753 



230 



1,200 

411,235 

8,695 

9,261,702 

1,182,333 



10,865,165 



254,541 

94 

119,395 

1,800 

121,460 

107,181 



604,471 



962,150 
469,254 



1,431,404 



County 
State 



Total Assessments 



Total Expenditures 



360,387 
146,469 



360,387 
146,469 



506,856 











506,856 




36,562,544 


4,523,887 


9,521,823 


1,441,910 


52,050,164 



78 



FISCAL YEAR 1988— REVENUE BY FUND 



DEPARTMENT 



GENERAL 


SPECIAL 


CAPITAL 


TRUST & 


COMBINED 


FUND 


REVENUE 


PROJECTS 


AGENCY 


TOTALS 


23,539,077 








23,539,077 


1,959,576 








1,959,576 


519 








519 


140,059 








140,059 


151,678 








151,678 


9,821,719 


3,655,631 






13,477,350 





830,578 






830,578 


126,202 








126,202 


35,160 








35,160 


89,307 


1,645,701 




647,859 


2,382,867 


439,017 








439,017 


244,077 








244,077 


359,879 


17,789 




100,217 


477,885 


24,435 








24,435 


7,215 








7,215 



Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Taxes 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes 

Interest Property Taxes 

Hotel-Motel Excise Taxes 

Intergovernmental — State 

Intergovernmental — Federal 

Fees 

Rentals 

Departmental 

Licenses and Permits 

Fines and Forfeits 

Investment Income 

Lowell Regional Transit Auth 

Misc. 

Total Revenue 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCE: 

Bond Proceeds 
Operating Transfers In 
Operating Transfers Out 

Total Other Finance Source 



Total Revenue and Other 
Financing Source 

Excess of Revenues Over 
Expenditures 



36,937,920 


6,149,699 





748,076 


43,835,695 



582,969 

-816,789 




11,799 

-360,103 


9,507,067 

3,520 






801,470 

-222,866 


9,507,067 

1,399,758 

-1,399,758 


-2?3,820 


-348,304 


9,510,587 


578,604 


9,507,067 


36,704,100 


5,801,395 


9,510,587 


1,326,680 


53,342,762 


141,556 


1,277,508 


-11,236 


-115,230 


1,292,598 



79 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Fiscal "88" proved to be a very progressive year in the 
fire service and we are happy to say fire loss was low. 

Again, due to the cooperation of the officers, firefighters 
and office staff, I feel that we had another year in which 
we made great progress. 

We have worked hard this past year complying with new 
rules and regulations, modernizing the stations with what 
funds we had to work with. All five (5) stations have been 
painted in and out and all the lighting has been changed 
to energy efficient lights. We have put in service a new fire 
alarm truck to take care of the elaborate fire alarm system 
that this day and age demands. 

We have purchased a small amount of hazmat equip- 
ment and put it in service. Our equipment is a small begin- 
ning but we are hoping eventually this will be implemented 
on a regional basis because of the cost of compliance. 

We had a few changes this year within our department. 



Firefighter Gerald Tonks, a member of the department 
since 1966 retired through superannuation. Mary Ann 
Koulas, our department assistant also retired after 20 years 
service with the Fire Department. Robert Villare, a 
firefighter transferred to the Police Department. James 
Durkin and John Robinson were appointed as permanent 
firefighters. 

It is our desire to continue to serve the Town in the best 
possible manner and wish to thank you for your support 
in the past and in the future. 

I would also like to thank the town officials and 
employees for the continued cooperation during "1988". For 
the men in the department — again, my sincere thanks and 
my deep appreciation for your support toward me as chief 
and for your high standard of courage shown this year, as 
always. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert L. Hughes 
Fire Chief 



CHELMSFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT CALLS— 1988 





Vehicle 




Medical 


Mutual 






Service 


False 




1988 


Auto 


Building 


Assistance 


Aid 


Invest. 


Outdoor 


Calls 


Alarms 


Totals 


January 


8 


5 


36 





73 


8 


8 


6 


144 


February 


5 


8 


45 


— 


46 


1 


7 


5 


117 


March 


4 


7 


59 


5 


60 


18 


8 


8 


169 


April 


5 


4 


34 


3 


75 


30 


9 


11 


171 


May 


4 


5 


49 


— 


55 


14 


15 


3 


145 


June 


8 


7 


34 


— 


73 


12 


9 


4 


147 


July 


7 


3 


61 


2 


73 


13 


18 


1 


178 


August 


10 


6 


49 


1 


74 


9 


8 


9 


166 


September 


7 


4 


34 


1 


49 


9 


17 


8 


129 


October 


6 


2 


40 


1 


66 


4 


13 


4 


136 


November 


8 


5 


41 


1 


70 


11 


14 


3 


153 


December 


7 


7 


48 


2 


72 


9 


12 


- 


157 



Total 



79 



63 



530 



16 



786 



138 



138 



62 



1812 



FIRE CHIEF 

Robert L. Hughes 

DEPUTH FIRE CHIEF 

James A. Sousa 

CAPTAINS 

Charles S. Galloway, Jr. 

James M. Spinney 

Charles A. Schramm 

James P. Boermeester 

Michael F. Curran 



UNIT 1 



FIREFIGHTERS 



Arthur Anderson 
Emil Magiera 



UNIT 2 

Robert Bennett 
Donald Drew 



John Depalma 
William V. Cady, Jr. 
Ernest Frobese 
William Burke 
Edward Nolet 
William Jamer 
Richard Miller 
Brian Stanton 
David Campbell 
Mark Conlin 
David Clancy 
Anthony Cincevich 

UNIT 3 

Peter Wetherbee 
Francis Conlin 
William Hadley 
Walter F. Adley, Jr. 



Richard O'Neil 
Leo Martin 
Dennis Vargeletis 
William Curran 
Joseph Spinazola 
Peter Johnson 
John Ubele 
John Reid 
William Keohane 
Leslie Merrill 
James Durkin 
John Robinson 

UNIT 4 

Jack Hadley 
Paul Henderson 
James Cutter 
James Flaherty 



80 



Richard Grenon 
Michael McTeague 
James Curran 
Michael Ridlon 
Raymond Kydd 
William F. Dalton 
Thomas Miskell 
John Carroll 
William Campbell 
James Reid 

SENIOR CLERK 

Martha A. Desaulnier 

JUNIOR CLERK 

Barbara O'Leary 



Paul D. Hayes 
Terrance Goode 
Daniel Reid 
David Gelineau 
Dennis Keohane 
Bruce Donovan 
David Hadley 
Kevin Clarke 
Arthur Rivard 
Jesse Foster 

MECHANICS 

Anthony Vaccaro 
James Keeley 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

I hereby submit my report of the Highway Department 
for the year 1988. 

The maintenance of all town streets was carried out in 
the usual manner. This includes street sweeping, basin 
cleaning and repairs, the cleaning of brooks, culverts and 
drainage easements, patching pot holes and washouts, 
replacement and erection of street signs, the painting of 
traffic lines and cross walks, guard rail repair, roadside 
mowing and brush trimming. In the winter months the 
department sanded, salted, snow plowed and removed snow 
when necessary, to insure safe travel for the public. 

The following roads were resurfaced with bituminous 
concrete: Warren Ave. (from Boston Road to Pine Street); 
Riverneck Road (from Billerica Road to Digital); Smith 
Street (from Parkhurst Road to Balsam Drive); Old 
Westford Road (from Westford Street to Rack Road); Drum 
Hill Road (from Drum Hill Rotary to Union National 
Bank); Main Street (from School Street to Westford Town 
Line); Sections of Carlisle Street, Park Road, Pilgrim Road, 
Clover Hill Drive, and Wiggin Street. 

The following drainage projects were completed. Locust 
Road, High Street, Richardson Road, Fairbanks Road, 
Dunstable Road. Approximately 25 smaller projects were 
completed. We also oiled and stone sealed a major por- 
tion of the Westlands area. We plan to complete this area 
in the Spring. 

Also planned for the Spring are the resurfacing of the 
following streets: School Street (Main Street to Graniteville 
Road); Pine Hill Road (Westford Street to Clover Hill 
Road); DeWolf Drive (entire length). 

The department has experienced major changes in 
management personnel due to the retirement of the Supt. 
and both foremen. It is our goal to insure the citizens of 
Chelmsford prompt, courteous service as well as quality 
workmanship. I hope you will be understanding and pa- 
tient with us as we bring the town into the 1990s. 



The department wishes to thank Harold Gray, Supt., 
Frederick "Huck" Greenwood, foreman and Arthur 
"Blackie" Deschaine, foreman, for their many years of 
dedicated service to the town and we wish them a long and 
prosperous retirement. 

I would also like to thank the men in the department 
for their cooperation throughout the year and to express 
my appreciation to other Town Departments for their help 
throughout the year. A special thanks goes to Pearl Koulas 
and Shirley Fletcher for all their extra time and effort in 
keeping the office running smoothly and to the foremen, 
Bobby Loyd, Roy Costa and Rick Dillon for all their help 
and advice. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael A Crory 

Supt. of Streets 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT ROSTER 

Superintendent of Streets 

Michael A. Crory 



Bobby Loyd 



Foreman 
Roy Costa 



Frederick Dillon 



Supervisor of Central Operations 

Pearl Koulas 

Clerk 

Shirley Fletcher 

Grader Operator 

Arthur L. Newcomb 

Mechanics — Heavy Equipment 

John C. Ferreira, Jr. 
Richard Jensen 

Engineering Equipment Operators 

Dennis Greenwood 

Lawrence J. Ferreira 

Walter J. McLaughlin, Jr. 

Richard Soucier 

Truck Drivers, Laborers 

Gary E. Beaulieu Stephen Harvey 

John J. Cronin Ernest A. Howland 

James T. Crotty Edward Jamros 

Robert Dearborn Joseph C. Oczkowski 

Laborers 

Leslie L. Dukeshire, Jr. 

Kenneth R. Burroughs 

Mickey Dearborn 



81 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



I hereby submit my report for the year 1988. 



CALENDAR YEAR 



# OF FEES COLLECTED 



1988 


PERMITS 


1988 


Building Permits 


620 


$229,455.00 


Gas Permits 


850 


19,194.00 


Plumbing Permits 


771 


17,726.00 


Wire Permits 


861 


35,831.00 


Sign Permits 


89 


4,795.00 


Cert, of Inspections 


104 


4,235.00 


Cert, of Occupancy 


33 


1,400.00 


Yard Sale Permits 


116 


680.00 


Totals: 


3,444 


$313,316.00 



Sincerely, 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 
Inspector of Buildings 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Annual Report of the Police Department for the year 
1988. 

At the present time the department is made up of 56 
permanent officers. 

Chief of Police 
Raymond P. McKeon 

Deputy Chief of Administration 

James C. Greska 

Deputy Chief of Operations 

Pennryn D. Fitts 

Captains 

Armand J. Caron John J. Mack 

Phillip N. Molleur 



Leslie H. Adams 
Robert M. Burns 
Steven Burns 



Sergeants 

Raymond G. McCusker 
John O. Walsh 



Department Criminal Prosecution — 
Lowell District Court 

Sergeant Lance Cunningham 

Criminal Bureau 

Sergeant 

William R. McAllister 

Inspectors 

Brian F. Mullen Eugene W. Walsh 

James F. Murphy Ernest R. Woessner 

Timothy F. O'Connor 



Drug/Alcohol Control Unit 

Sergeant 

Francis X. Roark 



Jared S. Finnegan 



Inspectors 

Roland E. Linstad 



Community Services & Safety Officer 
Patrick W. Daley 

Crime Prevention Officer 

Joseph R. Gamache 

Juvenile Officer 

Kenneth R. Duane 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
Paul E. Cooper 
Alan Cote 
Bruce A. Darwin 
John J. Donovan 
James T. Finnegan 
William J. Floyd, III 
Daniel Houston 
Gail Hunter 
Francis P. Kelly 
Martin Kirkorian 
Russell H. Linstad 
David MacKenzie 
John M. McGeown 
Peter C. McGeown 



Donna Fox 
Michelle Guillemette 
Karen M. Leonard 



Patrolmen 

Debra Metcalf 
James F. Midgley 
Thomas A. Niemaszyk 
John E. Redican 
Paul Richardson 
Chandler J. Robinson 
Edward M. Rooney 
E. Michael Rooney 
Mark St. Hilaire 
Michael M. Stott 
William S. Strobel 
Francis Teehan 
Robert Trudel 
Scott Ubele 
Robert Villare 
William R. Walsh 

Matrons 

Kimberly Martin 
Jo-Ann Molleur 



Principal Clerk 

Karen M. Leonard 

Senior Clerks 
Marie K. DiRocco Mary Jane Grant Jo-Ann Moelleur 

Jr. Clerk 

Donna Fox 



RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

1987 1988 

Photocopying Machine $8,322.00 $4,525.00 

Firearms Permits 1,305.00 3,910.00 

Bicycle Registration 11.00 23.50 

Firearms Identification Cards 422.00 462.00 

Court Fines 193,730.50 226,083.50 

Photographs 422.00 788.00 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 15,489.28 27,767.69 

Miscellaneous 6,330.00 9,880.00 

Parking Fines 15,120.00 12,980.00 

Restitution 15,053.20 18,345.00 

Total Receipts returned to the 

Town $255,326.98 $304,764.69 



82 



ARRESTS 

1987 1988 

Crimes Against Persons 72 36 

Crimes Against Property 178 129 

Crimes Against Public Order 367 293 

DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Fines 96 108 

Placed On Probation 25 19 

Suspended Sentence & Placed on 

Probation 8 8 

Placed On File 43 38 

Not Guilty Finding 3 

Dismissed With Probable Cause 7 4 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs & 

Continued Without A Finding 99 7 

Committed to Youth Services Board .... 1 3 

Committed to M.C.I. Cedar Junction . .1 

Committed to M.C.I. Concord 

Committed to House of Correction, 

Billerica 15 22 

Turned Over to Other P.D.'s & Courts . 16 55 

Cases Pending & Continued in Court 308 170 

Placed in Alcohol Safety Program .... 36 19 

MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

Calls Answered by Cruisers 11,862 10,689 

Summons Served 752 643 

Licenses Suspended or Revoked 832 300 

Accidents Reported 2,150 1,791 

Personal Injury Accidents 537 475 

Fatal Accidents 3 2 

Mileage on Cruisers 380,200 485,434 

Special Property Checks 

(Aux. Police) 5,750 34,800 

Station Lockups 729 513 

Citations Issued 3,568 5,858 

Parking Violations 1,462 998 

Doors & Windows Found Open 54 69 

Detoxification Unit 112 80 



Quarters for the Drug and Alcohol Control Unit was con- 
structed in the rear garage. This will provide this unit with 
the separate and confidential environment so necessary to 
their efforts. 

A drug "Hot Line" telephone was installed in the Drug 
and Alcohol Control Unit quarters. The number, 256-6257, 
is equipped with an answering machine and all calls, both 
confidential and anonymous will be investigated. 

What was formerly the huge walk- in safe was remodel- 
ed to provide the Superior officers with a much-needed 
locker room. 

The police station parking lot expansion project was at 
least completed to the degree that there is more space to 
accommodate 33 additional vehicles. 

The new radio console system was installed and provides 
the department with a state-of-the-art communications 
center. 



The department implemented a Color Guard this year. 
Members were selected on a volunteer basis and already 
this honor guard unit has marched in parades, funerals 
and other notable functions. All expenses for this unit are 
paid via the Chelmsford Police Department Community 
Action Foundation, Inc. 

This year saw the inception of a 3 Officer Traffic Con- 
trol Unit and unfortunately, due to fiscal constraints, the 
termination of this unit. While in operation over a period 
of 6 months, this concept met with a great degree of suc- 
cess and was highly applauded by the townspeople. 

The efforts of this department served to generate the sum 
of $304,764.69 which revered back into the general fund 
of the Town. 

AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

The year 1988 was one of the most productive years ever 
in the history of the Auxiliary Police unit. The events that 
the Auxiliary assisted at are Memorial Day Parade, Early 
Bird Road Race, Flag Day ceremonies, Middlesex County 
Kennel Club Show, Chelmsford High School graduation, 
July 3rd festivities, July 4th parade, Halloween school 
security, Thanksgiving football field and school security. 
This year as in past years, the Auxiliary performed our va- 
cant house checks and school and town property checks. 
The program was in operation on 341 nights. The statistics 
were vacant home checks 3,480, school checks 12,180, town 
and special property checks 19,140 for a total property 
check figure of 34,800. This year the second Auxiliary 
cruiser was in full operation. The unit continues to train 
and we currently have six officers attending the Mass. 
Criminal Justice Reserve Police Officers Academy, which 
meets once a week for 16 weeks. The officers receive train- 
ing in Criminal Law, Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation, First 
Aid and Firearms. The Auxiliary continues to sponsor the 
Law Enforcement Explorer Post #370 and these young men 
and women participated in every event with the unit. This 
past June 29, 1988, the Dracut police requested assistance 
in locating a missing elderly male alzheimer's patient who 
was possibly in the Dracut Town forest. The Auxiliary and 
Explorer scouts responded and were directly involved with 
locating and probably saving the man's life. The unit and 
the scouts received praise from the Dracut Chief of Police. 
The past year the amount of hours donated to the town 
almost quadrupled. The men and women of the Auxiliary 
donated a total of 19,348 man hours. During its nightly 
cruiser patrol duties, the unit assisted the regulars at acci- 
dent scenes with traffic control and at large youth parties. 
This year the Auxiliary also assisted the town with the sewer 
construction details for traffic control. 

I would like to thank the members of my Auxiliary unit 
for their extraordinary effort and time and to the explorer 
scouts and the members' families who gave so much of their 
time to the town. I would like to thank the Board of Select- 
men for their support, the Chief and the Deputy Chiefs 
and the officers of the police department for their assis- 
tance and support over the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sergeant Raymond G. McCusker 






83 



Auxiliary Roster 

Director — Sgt. Raymond C. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 



Mike Beaudoion 
Bill Beaumont 
John Bell 
Ken Berger 
Russell Bovill 
Joseph Eriksen 
George Fetzer 
Eric Gordon 
Dave Irvine 
Dave Leo 
Heather Linstad 
Kim Martin 
Steve Manning 
Daniel McLarney 



Auxiliary Officers 

Erik Merrill 
Fred Pomerleau 
Brad Poole 
Kevin Proulx 
Edward Quinn 
James Quinn 
Ralph Roscoe 
Joseph Shields 
James Spinney 
Mike Taplin 
Bill Tessier 
David Tyler 
Steve Vowels 
Craig Walsh 



Vocational rehabilitation 
training for disabled 
veterans 



3,300.00 



Presently, I serve as Vice-Chairman of the Auditing and 
Finance Committee for the Massachusetts Veterans' Agent 
Association. Also, serve on their Executive Board. I con- 
tinue to be active with Middlesex County Veterans' Agents 
association and hold membership in American Society of 
Notaries. I wish to express my appreciation to town Of- 
ficials, "Spirit of Christmas", American Legion Posts 212 
and 313 and other civic organizations for their continued 
cooperation during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe, LSW 
Certified Veterans' Agent 



VETERANS' SERVICES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and residents of 
the Town of Chelmsford, I am submitting the annual report 
of activities of this department as Veterans' Agent and In- 
vestigator for the year of 1988. 

Veterans' Benefits is a state mandated organization duly 
authorized under Chapter 115, MGL Section 1 through 5. 
Two valued services are provided. One pertains to assistance 
with federal benefits under the Veterans' Administration, 
the other to financially aid and give assistance to qualified 
veterans and their dependents under Veterans' Benefits. 

The Cash and Material Grant of $53,000.00 from the 
Town of Chelmsford is reimbursed 75% by the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts. On a state level my case load 
varies between 22 and 28 families. 

Veterans Administration/ Federal Expenditures 
Town of Chelmsford 

Compensation to veterans' 

service-connected death $ 7,500.00 

Dependents Indemnity 

Compensation (DIC) 118,250.00 

Sons, daughters, wives and 

widows education 32,000.00 

Specially adapted housing 

for disabled veterans 1,100.00 

Veterans' death pension 195,200.00 

Veterans disability 

compensation 170,500.00 

Veterans disability pension 190,000.00 

Veterans insurance and 

indemnities 125,000.00 

Veterans re -adjustment 

training 75,000.00 

Veterans burial awards and 

other miscellaneous benefit 

payments 18,000.00 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members 

Daniel Burke, Chairman Gustave Fallgren 

Robert Kydd, Vice Chairman Eileen Duffy 

Harold Organ, Jr. 



Robert Scharn 



Alternates 

Karen Wharton 

Clerk 

Marjorie Hennessy 



Ronald Pare 



Hearing Statistics: 

Variances 
Special Permits 
Comprehensive Permit 

Total 



Total Granted Denied Withdrawn 

75 59 9 7 

22 14 8 

4 2 2 



101 



75 



19 



Number of Meetings held for Comprehensive Permits 



Russell Mill 
Lamplighter Green 
Housing Authority 
The Commons 



4 
_6 
23 



The Board of Appeals met in excess of forty evenings 
during 1988, well above any other period in the history 
of the Town of Chelmsford. The reason for the high 
number of meetings was the filing of four (4) Comprehen- 
sive Permits (Chapter 40B) for Affordable Housing. 

The Board welcomed its newest alternate, Karen Whar- 
ton, Karen has brought a conscientious and objective view- 
point to the Board that is a must for any person sitting 
in this capacity. 

I would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank 
the efforts of the Board this past year, particularly those 



84 



members who sat as a body on all Comprehensive Permits. 
Those sitting were Robert Kydd, Gus Fallgren, Eileen Duf- 
fy, Ron Pare and Dan Burke. These five members were 
consistent and objective in all decisions made regarding 
the Comprehensive Permit process and sometimes under 
very difficult circumstances, made the proper decisions on 
the merits of each individual application. 

It has been a pleasure serving with this group on these 
permit hearings and I would also like to thank Bernie 
Lynch, the Board of Selectmen, Richard Day, the Finance 
Committee, and all other Town Boards for their coopera- 
tion during 1988. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel W. Burke, Chairman 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Stephen J. Chinetti 
Raymond Day 
James Gifford 



Walter R. Hedlund 
Charles Marderasion 



The annual 1988 Fourth of July Celebration was a huge 
success, thanks to all Chelmsford Organizations that par- 
ticipated and assisted in the Celebration. We, wish to thank 
all. 

Plans are progressing for the 1989 Annual Fourth of Ju- 
ly Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Emergency Coordinator 
John E. Abbott William W. Edge 

George R. Dixon Police Depty. Pennryn D. Fitts 

Raymond Day Fire Capt. Charles S. Galloway 

The Emergency Management Committee (Civil Defense) 
has been very active this past year, preparing plans for Ti- 
tle 111 S.A.R.A. Hazardous Plans. The Committee meets 
the second Tuesday of each months, preparing reports for 
Federal and State Emergency Agencies. 

Many volunteer hours were spent this past year by 
Emergency Coordinator and members at various Seminars 
of Hazardous Materials, Radiology and Natural Disasters. 

We, thank the Board of Selectmen, Executive Secretary 
and all Department Heads and personnel for their coopera- 
tion during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



CHELMSFORD COMMISSION ON 
HANDICAPPED AFFAIRS 

Commission meetings are held the 4th Tuesday of the 
month at the Chelmsford Town Offices. The Commission 
worked enthusiastically during the year and met once a 
month. 

Several accessibility studies were done throughout the 
town including public buildings, restaurants, schools, 
apartments, and condominiums. 

The Commission sponsored a regional meeting of area 
handicapped commissions in late October which was well 
attended and well received. The excellent accessibility of 
the Town Offices was a commonly heard comment before 
and after the meeting. 

Finally, a townwide survey to determine the various 
disabilities, and the number and needs of Chelmsford's 
disabled citizens was prepared as a questionnaire. Distribu- 
tion to all Chelmsford residents is expected in early 1989. 
Accordingly, the Commission will focus its efforts on these 
areas. 



85 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

ANNUAL REPORT 

1988 







Term 


Members 


Responsibilities 


Exp. 


James H. McBride 


Chairman 


1989 


Judith Hass 


Land Acquisition 


1990 


William R. Greenwood 


Wetlands 


1991 


Charles Galloway 


Clerk & Reservation 






Mgt. 


1991 


Dr. John Droescher 


Wetlands 


1990 


John D. Scott 


Treasurer & Land 






Acquisition 


1991 


Karen G. Flynn 


Wetlands 


1989 


Marjorie Hennessy 


Secretary 





The Conservation Commission continues to keep as its 
primary goal the preservation of the natural and desirable 
aspects of the Town of Chelmsford. 

The duties associated with the local administration of 
the Wetlands Protection Act easily absorb most of the time 
and effort of the Commission members. A total of eigh- 
teen public hearings were held this year in accordance with 
Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. After careful review of each proposed plan, the 
Commission issued sixteen Orders of Conditions. One was 
withdrawn and another is still pending. Eleven hearings 
were also held for Determination of Applicability of the 
Wetlands Protection Act and ten Negative Determinations 
were issued. 

Community involvement in advising the Commission 
when wetlands transgressions begin to happen has been a 
tremendous help in assisting the Commission with the pro- 
tection of the Town's wetland areas. Cooperation between 
Town Boards has enabled the Commission to inform a 
developer at the beginning stages of the development that 
a filing with the Commission would be necessary. This helps 
to avoid costly and unnecessary expenses on the part of 
the town and the developer. 

Hopefully, in the coming year, work will be completed 
at the Wright Reservation with the help of the Chelmsford 
Garden Club. 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

When the going gets tough — the tough get going! 

"True Grit" was a movie made famous by John Wayne 
and in many ways it characterizes the quality of 
Chelmsford's older citizens during this past year. For they 
clearly demonstrated to everyone their resilient fiber, 
unswerving perseverance and steadfast enthusiasm to build 
a new center. Set back in August by the high construction 
costs for their original building, they quickly regrouped, 
made the necessary concessions and moved on to a new 
design. The fruit of their perseverance was an acceptable 
bid by D.G.R. Construction Co. of North Billerica to build 
the new center at a cost of $1,842,893. Alleluia! 

Senior Power 

Amid the challenges there was considerable growth and 
reward. The Furnishing & Support Committee, under the 
chairmanship of Mr. Gene Raby, reached the $100,000 
mark and they will continue to work steadily towards their 
goal of $150,000. All of the monies received will go direct- 
ly into furnishing and supporting the expenses at the new 
center. A true tribute to their responsible attitude and in- 
dependent resourcefulness. 

Meeting the Needs 

Positive growth was apparent in all activities. 
Nutrition Program: 24,000 lunches 
Meals on Wheels: 12,500 delivered lunches 
Lectures: (Medical, 1,200 participants) 
Legal, Health) 



Respite: 



General: 



Outreach: 



Transportation: 



Tax & Fuel 
Assistance: 
Home Visits: 



Friendly Visitor: 



45 families with 18,000 hrs. 
of service 

Over 300 people used the 
Center each week 
Planned activities for the 
101 residents at McFarlin & 
Smith St. each week 
Over 6,000 trips to 
hospitals, day care centers, 
doctor's office, shopping & 
activities 

Volunteers and Senior 
Aides assisted 223 clients 
On average over Senior 
Aides (4) and Outreach 
Worker visited over 100 
home-bound elders each 
week 

At year's end we had 14 
matchups and this program 
will continue to grow) 



General Comments 



Considering the budget cuts, we demonstrate extraor- 
dinary determination and desire to maintain quality ser- 
vices and to expand into new areas. As we progress, we will 
evolve and we will draw younger people into our ranks. 
Intergenerational programs at the high school and educa- 



86 



tional seminars for caregivers are two examples. Reaching 
out to the frail and the home-bound will continue to be 
our highest priority. We can look back with satisfaction, 
but we must look ahead with vision and the commitment 
to make it a reality. 

COA Members: Ashton Ricker, Chairman, Christina 
Ahern, Allen Bennett, Esther Christensen, Robert Clough, 
Annette Holtzman, Kathleen McDonald, Jean Mark, 
Howard Moore, Fern Ricker, Verne Woodward. 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Robert Charpentier 
Evelyn Newman 
Michael Ablove 
Robert Crowley 
Robert Hayes 
Paul Murphy 
Joan Murray 
Ron Zylich 
Lorraine Murphy 



MEMBERS 

Chairman 
Vice Chairman 



Clerk 



The Chelmsford Recreation Commission is appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen. The Commission is responsible 
for developing, administering and supporting programs 
and facilities designed to fill the recreation needs of the 
residents of the Town. 

The major portion of the Commission's activities is, and 
always has been, connected with organized youth activities. 
The Commission provides very limited funding for these 
activities; its main contribution to their success is as a 
liaison between organizations and other Town authorities, 
including the School Committee, the Board of Selectmen, 
the Parks Department, and the Varney Commission. In- 
deed, the success of these youth activities would not be 
possible without the continued cooperation of these com- 
munity authorities, especially in the area of scheduling 
fields and gymnasiums for all recreational activities. 

Participation in the Summer Program continues to in- 
crease with the following activities being offered through 
the Summer months: 

Outside & inside basketball, tennis lessons, playground 
programs at Varney Playground, Westland, South Row 
and Byam Schools, a swim and swimming lessons pro- 
gram at Freeman Lake, cross country track and field 
at the High School track. A six week series of free pro- 
grams for children is offered on Wednesday mornings 
in the Town Offices gymnasium. A series of Concerts 
on the Common by the Chelmsford Community Band 
takes place throughout the Summer. 

The Southwell Complex in North Chelmsford is now 
completed and does provide lighting for night use. 

The Recreation Awards Committee helps needy youths 
of our community to attend sports clinics. The very popular 



Summer Basketball Camp held under the direction of Jon 
Aronie, has presented Recreation with a donation to help 
with these awards. 

With the generous donation from Women of Today, the 
Roberts Tot Lot has been refurbished. New equipment has 
been received for this lot and will be installed in the Spring. 

The basketball court at South Row School has been 
resurfaced and relined. We would also like to add a stan- 
dard and reline the basketball court at McFarlin field. 
Recreation Commission is responsible for the lighting for 
night skating at Roberts Field. We also furnished lighting 
for the McCarthy parking light, which also partly lights 
the track. 

The new soccer fields on the Mill Road site will be ready 
for use by Spring of 1989. This project has been a 
cooperative effort between Recreation and Soccer Associa- 
tion. We wish to thank the Highway Department for their 
cooperation and help in getting this project completed. We 
are now in the process of attempting to obtain water so 
sprinklers can be added so that these fine fields can re- 
main in such fine condition. 



VETERANS' 
EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

The information presented this year is the Forty- First An- 
nual Report of the Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee. 
The fund was established in 1947 for the benefit of Veterans 
of World War II, and to be administered by a Committee, 
appointed by the Selectmen annually. Each committee 
member shall be a Veteran of World War II, and each 
voting precinct of the town shall be represented on the 
committee. 

The membership of the committee did change during 
1988 since the number of voting precincts was reduced from 
twelve precincts to nine precincts. 

One application for assistance was received during 1988 
and was unanimously approved. Assistance was granted for 
a World War II Veteran with payment of a hospital bill. 

Applications for assistance normally are sent to the 
Veterans' Agent and if the Veteran's Benefits Department 
is unable to assist, the application is then forwarded to our 
committee. 

Assistance is always given in the form of material grants, 
such as rent, medical, fuel, light and clothing. 

The fund did increase during 1988 over $500.00 as well 
as disbursement of funds to help a Veteran. A Treasurer's 
Report also appears in the Annual Town Report. 

The present membership of the committee is listed as 
follows: 

Precinct 1: Russell E. Starck 
Precinct 2: Russell E. Butterfield 



87 



Precinct 3: James J. Walker 
Precinct 4: John J. McNulty 
Precinct 5: George F. Waite 
Precinct 6: Alfred H. Coburn 
Precinct 7: Robert T. Clough 
Precinct 8: Thomas F. Balfrey 
Precinct 9: Melvin E. dejager 

Members who have served in the past, and not reap- 
pointed in 1988, due to precinct changes are: 

Robert E. Donaldson Harold C. Giffin 

Herbert T. Knutson Carl J. Lebedzinski 

We wish to thank each of these past members for their 
service on the committee and for their willingness to serve. 

The committee members extend their appreciation to 
the various town officials, to the Veterans' Agent and staff, 
and to town employees who have helped the committee dur- 
ing the past years. 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
January 1st, 1988 through December 31st, 1988 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1988: $12,898.00 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: $219.28 

The Comfed Savings Bank, Lowell, 
Mass. 

Interest: 325.99 

The Lowell Five Cent Savings 
Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest: 441.13 

Total Interest Received: 986.40 

Total Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1988 and Receipts:. . 13,884.40 

Deduct Disbursements 

For Veteran's Assistance; one application approved for payment of 

medical bills from Central Savings Bank: 460.00 

Balance on Hand as of December 31st, 1988 13,424.40 



ASSSETS 
Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Account No. 128790 3,866.53 

Comfed Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Account No. 4574000012 4,060.52 

Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Account No. 440007431 5,497.35 

Total Assets 13,424.40 

Total Liabilities None 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities $13,424.40 



Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee, 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointments to Town Committees 91 

Appointed Town Officials 69 

Board of Appeals 83 

Board of Assessors 43 

Board of Health 44 

Board of Registrars 49 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Celebrations Committee 84 

Cemetery Commission 43 

Chelmsford Commission on Handicapped Affairs 84 

Conservation Commission 85 

Council on Aging 85 

Elected Town Officials 42 

Fire Department 79 

General Information 2 

Highway Department 80 

Housing Authority 45 

Inspections Department 81 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 47 

Personnel Board 48 

Police Department 81 

Police— Auxiliary 82 

Public Libraries 48 

Recreation Commission 86 

School Committee 51 

Sewer Commission 67 

Town Accountant 71 

Town Clerk 4 

Presidential Primary Results 5, 32 

Town Elections Results 8 

Annual Town Meeting— April 25, 1988 9 

Special Town Meeting— May 9, 1988 16 

State Primary Elections — September 15, 1988 32 

Special Town Meeting— September 19, 1988 34 

Special Town Election — November 1, 1988 39 

State Elections — November 8, 1988 40 

Town Directory Back Cover 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 69 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 86 

Veterans' Services 83 



NOTES 



NOTES 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN OFFICES 

50 BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824-2777 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 

"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS Willi YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please 
fill our this form and mail to: Executive Secretary, Board of Selectmen, 
Town Offices, 50 Billerica Road, Che 1ms ford, MA 01824. The filling out 
of this form in no way assures appointment. All committee vacancies will 
be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 

NAME HOME PHONE BUSINESS PHONE 

ADDRESS &-DUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE 

INTEREST IN WHAT TOIM COMMITTEES 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE. 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING, 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS, 



TOWN DIRECTORY 



Accounting: 250-5215 

Assessors: 250-5220 

Board of Appeals: 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 
Building Inspector: 250-5225 

(Yard Sales, Kennel & Bldg. Permits) 
Cemetery: 250-5245 
Community Teamwork: 459-0551 
Conservation Commission: 250-5247 

(12:30-4:30 pm) 
Council on Aging: 256-0013 
Dog Officer: 256-0754 
Fire Department: 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business: 250-5265 
Gas Inspector: 250-5225 
Health Department: 250-5241 
Highway Department: 250-5270 

Garage: 250-5271 
High School: 251-8729 
Housing Authority: 256-7425 
Libraries: Adams: 256-5521 
McKay: 251-3212 
Mass. Electric Co.: 458-1431 
Park Dept. Garage: 256-5073 
Planning Board Clerk: 250-5231 
Plumbing Inspector: 250-5225 
Police Department: 256-2521 
Post Office (Center): 256-2361 
Recreation Commission: 250-5262 

(8:30 am-12:30 pm) 
Registry of Deeds (Lowell):458-8474 
Registry of Motor Vehicles: 459-9397 
School Administration: 251-4981 
Selectmen: 250-5201 
Sewer Commission: 250-5233 
Supt. of Public Bldgs: 250-5249 
Town Clerk: 250-5205 
Town Engineer: 250-5228 
Treasurer/Tax Collector: 250-5210 
Veterans' Agent: 250-5238 
Water Dept: 256-2381 
Welcome Wagon: 663-4030 
Welfare (Lowell): 454-8061 
Wiring Inspector: 250-5225 
24-hr. Junior Hotline 1-800-792-5117 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 

Precinct 1: Town Offices Gym 
Precinct 2: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 3: Harrington School Gym 
Precinct 4: Westlands School 
Precinct 5: Byam School Cafetorium 
Precinct 6: Westlands School 
Precinct 7: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 8: McCarthy Middle School 
Precinct 9: Town Offices Gym 

U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 

Boston, MA 02116 

362 Russell Office Building 

Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Chester G. Atkins 

1429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, D.C. 20515 
Lowell no. 459-0101 

State Senator Carol C. Amick 

Room 416A State House 
Boston, MA 02133 722-1572 
Home: 18 Crescent Rd. Bedford 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 36 State House 

Boston, Ma 02133 722-2470 

Home: 4 Arbutus Ave., Chelmsford 

256-5043 

Middlesex County Commissioners 
Superior Courthouse 494-4100 
East Cambridge, MA 02141